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41 of 41 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2014
For me personally, vertical grips are almost a necessity. I just cannot maneuver cameras as well without a bottom grip, and I shoot nearly a 50-50 split of horizontal and vertical shots--sometimes even more vertical depending on the subject of course (portraits, bridals, basketball). I pre-ordered the battery grip at the same time as the body, because I knew I would just have to have it to work well for me ergonomically.

It isn't cheap. I mean that both ways: The price is kinda high for what it is, we all know that. Camera companies probably make more money on accessories than the actual bodies anyway. Lenses, grips, batteries. But it isn't cheaply-made either. It seems solid. The fit is just perfect on my X-T1. You need to take off a plastic cover over the contacts on grip(20!)and the rubber gasket over the contacts on the body and put the rubber cover into a recessed hole in the grip, align two strong pins on the edge of the grip that go into the body's bottom plate, then screw it down onto the camera. Easy enough.

There is a leathery-covering over the top plate of the grip. It something I haven't seen much of on other grips, but it looks nice for the 10 seconds you see it before attaching to your camera. And I do believe it may be functional. The very assuring way the grip aligns with the body as the grip is mounted is nice. There are NO squeaks once the two parts are perfectly joined. The grip does not ever feel loose or move around any. It's just the way it should be.

It does LOOK a bit big for what it is--which makes the camera look even more like a DSLR. That could be good or bad, certainly makes it taller, but its pretty slim (the cameras girth in general is much less than a DSLR). I wonder if there is extra space inside there, if there was some way they might have been able to fit TWO batteries in the grip (would probably be nice for extended shooting) but I don't think it would work. The battery kinda slides into the grip at an angle strangely, but its of no concern at all, just different.

You keep one battery in the camera body. I chose to keep the battery I got with the camera inside the body, making sure it was fully charged first. With all my grip-enabled cameras, I try to just use the body battery as necessity, not for general shooting--'cause its a bit of a pain to unscrew and dismount the grip to change out the battery in the camera. But it is easy to change the battery in the grip. There is a little slide release that opens the door on the left side (from shooter's position) of the grip/camera. You have to slide it BACK into position, there is no spring-loading--just like the battery cover on the camera. There is a spring-loaded clip inside, that holds battery in position, also just like the camera.

The controls work well. They basically duplicate what is on the camera. From top (vertically-arranged on the left) Focus Assist (abbreviated "F.A."), AE-L, and AF-L. Above and to the right is the selector wheel. All the buttons and the wheel look and feel exactly as the ones on the body. The SHUTTER RELEASE is also very similar. Same size and pressure-release sensitivity. There is a lock ring around the shutter button that mimics the ON-OFF switch on the camera. It of course just locks the release, does not power the camera on/off. The shutter seems almost the same trigger-feel as the body shutter release--maybe just a tad bit harder or longer (I may be imagining it)--it's so close you will not worry about it. And maybe I just need to shoot with it more and loosen it up a bit.

The grip on the camera FITS my hand very nicely. It feels solid, makes holding the camera in either position (H or V) more comfortable and grip-able (yea, that's what its for, huh?)
I think your hand rests even less on the selector dials on the camera with the grip attached (the D-pad that is too recessed making it hard to maneuver--hmm, maybe they shoulda just designed a built-in vertical grip that was slightly smaller and then made the D-pad on the camera work better!).

That's about it really. I'm sure if you are reading this you already figured most of this out, but I hope it was helpful anyway.
I have already shot some product shots that I will attach here with the review or on the X-T1 body review. Maybe they will be helpful for SIZE COMPARISON, as many might like to see how the camera compares to a few others in terms of size.

Thanks for reading ;)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2014
It improves the ergonomics of the camera greatly.

But also the big downside of the XT1 is the short battery life, so the ability to have a 2nd battery does make a big difference and allows for a reasonable day of shooting. Both batteries meters' show on the display, which is cool.

it is quality kit.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on March 29, 2014
All the other cameras with battery grips that I've used have a plastic door protecting the contacts on the bottom of the camera. That door is either removed and stored in the grip (Canon), or when opened fits into a slot in the grip (Sony). With the Fuji, there's a rubber insert in the camera base, and a rubber cover for the contacts on the grip. Both are hard to keep track of, and likely to get lost. Other brands also have two batteries in the grip, which may then stay on the camera all the time. With the Fuji, one battery remains in the camera, and there is one in the grip. So to charge/change both batteries, one must detach the grip. Given the short life of the charged batteries, the grip is a valuable accessory. Battery grip design seems to have matured in other brands, and I don't see any advantage to Fuji's variations. However, I love the camera and the images it produces. It's a well-balanced package with the grip attached, and I love shooting portraits with the 56mm lens.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on May 1, 2014
The camera battery compartment is not accessible with the grip attached. You'll have to remove the grip to get to the camera battery. The good part is that the camera uses the battery in the grip before the camera battery. Not an issue if you just need a vertical grip, but can be a problem if you need to change both batteries quickly.

My biggest problem with this is the distance and location of the function buttons in relation to thumb position when using the camera horizontally and vertically. I'm used to my Canon where the distance and position is relatively the same so my muscle memory for changing focus points is quick. Since it's different when going from vertical to horizontal on my X-T1, it's difficult for me to get it down quickly, and we all know how those function buttons don't feel so hot to begin with. As I understand it, focus and recompose is not a good technique specifically with these cameras so being able to quickly change focus points is important for me.

So far, because I am not skilled enough to adapt to the changes in relative location when shooting horizontally vs vertically, I can't switch focus points quickly enough. My thumb isn't really long enough and the buttons are so hard to find.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 24, 2014
For me, having the grip on this camera wasn't an option. I enjoy shooting vertically, and having the shutter release on the grip makes vertical shooting MUCH more intuitive. Vertical shooting aside, I also enjoy getting more battery life out of one charging session. You have to leave a battery in the camera while also having one in the grip, so you get roughly twice the battery life than you would without the grip. Of course, then you have to charge two batteries after a shoot.

It's not inexpensive...but it really helps this camera become more of a "normal", DSLR-like size, which makes it easier to handle, shooting vertically or horizontally. It fits perfectly on the X-T1. Similar to the grip on Nikon's D810, you line up the contacts, then spin the dial until it locks into place.

It balances out the camera quite well and doesn't feel overbearing or cumbersome. It feels as though its supposed to be there, as opposed to an afterthought accessory.

If you enjoy shooting vertically, I strongly recommend picking up one of these.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2015
Mirrorless cameras like the Fujifilm X-T1 are often chosen by photographers for being smaller and lighter than DSLRs, while giving little or nothing away in terms of features and image quality. There is a downside; a small camera body means a small battery. Add an electronic viewfinder and a sensor that is powered up pretty much full-time, and battery life can become a problem.

The VG-XT1 battery grip adds an extra NP-W126 battery (not included) to your Fujifilm X-T1, extending time between changes. It also increases the size of the camera body which may be advantageous for folks with large hands. Unlike the X-T1 body, there is no weather sealing.

The grip attaches to the body via the tripod socket. First remove the cover from the underside of the body, to expose connectors. The connector pins on the grip appear fragile, and have a protective cover which can be stored safely in a dedicated recess in the top of the grip. Once attached, the camera's own battery is not accessible.

There is a shutter button (which can be locked off) on the right side which makes shooting in portrait orientation more natural-feeling. Four of the camera body's controls are duplicated on the grip in the region of your right thumb; the rear command dial, and Focus Assist, AE-lock and AF-lock buttons. On the left is the battery compartment, with a port for an available DC power supply, useful for studio shooting. Unlike on the X-T1 body, the grip's tripod socket is aligned with the camera's lens axis. During use, the camera's displays show two battery status icons.

The grip plus battery weighs 7.2oz (204g), Combined weight of grip and battery plus X-T1 body with battery and SD card is 22.9oz (650g). This represents an approximately 46% weight increase to the camera body.

In situations where portability is not an issue, the improved ergonomics offered by this accessory make it a real winner. Subjectively, it makes the camera look more "professional" too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The battery grip gives some added heft to the camera when using heavier lenses (50-140 2.8 or 16-55 2.8 in my case.)

Overall it works very well, but there are a couple of things that I am not crazy about.

First, the little cap that protects the pins on the grip is incredibly easy to lose.. it would have been nice for a second area on top carved out to put it when it is in use (like the one for the soft rubber cap that protects the contacts on the bottom of the camera)

Second, the button placement is different than on the standard grip, so I spend a lot of time hunting for the AF-L button because I like using the back button to focus the camera. (I was able to solve the problem by putting a small dab of clear nail polish on the button so I could feel when I found the right button to focus.)

Again, all in all it is a fine grip, but those two things are annoyances.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2015
I like the grip especially for feeling better when shooting, but this often makes transporting in my smaller bags odd due to the size of the grip attached. It just so happens that my Lowepro 200 AW bag works great with this system but once you put the grip on it doesn't slide into its space so well. The advantages are obviously when either tripod mounted or shooting all day where battery life can get drained quicker. So far it does not get used for the majority of my Fuji shooting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 26, 2014
The FujiFilm Vertical Battery Grip for the XT-1 is a valuable addition. It provides a much needed additional battery, and more importantly adds improved ergonomics for the larger Fuji lenses (XF 55-200, XF 56, XF 10-24) with both added grip comfort and excellent button placement for portrait oriented shots.
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on January 21, 2015
Works well. I only wish the small buttons were a bit larger (same size as the body). Love the vertical trigger and I have large hands, so my hand doesn't "fall off" the bottom of the camera. Only issue is changing batteries while the camera is on causes a quick loss of power, which could be an issue if you were doing filming or a time lapse. But once exhausted, the camera does use the internal battery.
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