whats the differance (if there is any) for the first editions??


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 34 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 23, 2007 1:46:29 PM PDT
Kirstin Reid says:
I was wondering how you can tell if you have a first edition HP book and whats the differance (if there is any at all) between 1st edition and other printings of them? Also I have 2 copies of some of the books and one of my HP and the Chamber of Secrets dosent say "year 2" on its spine like the rest do, does anyone else have a book like that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2007 2:45:35 PM PDT
M. P. Pang says:
The difference between 1st edition and all other editions is mainly the fact that 1st editions might be worth more later on and possible printing errors might've been corrected. To find what edition you have, on one of the first few pages is the page with the library of Congress number, publication date, etc. There's a row of numbers. On HP and the DH, it goes 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 This means that it's a 1st edition. If it was for example a 2nd edition, the 1 wouldn't be there and it would go 10...2

And as for the Chamber of Secrets, my copy has the Year 2 printing on the spine. Yours was probably an earlier edition, because I got mine with the 8th edition around early 2000 and since it was released in 1998, they must've corrected it by the time I got my copy.

Hope this helps

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2007 8:11:31 PM PDT
K. Ennis says:
Um, I don't see how the row of numbers is relevant. That's describing how it was bound. But my first edition book I just looked at clearly says "first edition" on the page with all the Library of Congress information.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 3:37:40 AM PDT
M. P. Pang says:
According to the links, the number on the farthest right of the row of numbers is the _th printing of the book. For my HP and CoS book, the row of numbers say 10 9 8. That means that I got the 8th printing of the book.

Technically Kirstin, I didn't answer your question, but gave some info on the printing info. If you have the 1st edition of one of the books, it should state 1st edition or 1st American edition. My 2nd HP book has the Year 2 spine, but doesn't have an indication of a 1st edition. So mine is probably a 2nd edition. FYI, if you own any of the first 3 (because of low printing numbers) and you have the 1st printing of the 1st edition, keep them safe. They'll be worth a lot.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AtdbMXUn8nCzvwOv2YUagBYjzKIX?qid=20070606102727AAuIdHA
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Ash_3i7nOzgRrzHNMGSIpjIjzKIX?qid=20070408055629AAXb9oc
http://www.booklibris.com/BLFirstEditionID.htm

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 7:32:04 AM PDT
Leonard Orth says:
1st Editions are worth more to those interested in collecting or investments. If you are collecting the books because you love them and have no intention of selling them. Then the edition doesn't matter. If you intend on collecting with the possibility of selling them later on you should always look for 1st editions.
I'm not sure I would be overly concerned about which edition you had of any of the last 4 or 5 Harry Potter series. So many copies have been made that there will always be copies around making the resale value next to non existent.
If you are able to get a copy of the true first editions of the first Potter book. That would be worth some serious bank in years to come. I'm talking about the british 1st edition of which only several thousand copies were produced.
Enjoy your collecting :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 8:13:34 AM PDT
Jerika says:
The reason 1st editions are of interest to collectors, folks, is because they tend to be smaller print runs. A 1st edition of a book with an initial print run of, say, 20 million is never going to be all that valuable, sorry.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 8:18:45 AM PDT
Kirstin Reid says:
Thank you to all of you about the edition information. But does anybody else have a HP book hat dosent have the year on the spine of the book? I did check and the HPCOS is a 4th edition and its the one missing the "year 2"

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 1:56:53 PM PDT
Erica says:
Kirstin,

They stopped printing the year on the spine of that title in 2000. You could still find some copies with the "Year 2" through 2001, but after that it was trickier.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 2:01:01 PM PDT
Erica says:
Look for the row of numbers if it's from a larger publisher (not self-published). Books that are _not_ first editions will also sometimes have the statement of first edition on the copyright page... some will mention that the first edition was in a particular year while others won't.

The book _has_ to have the 10 down to the 1 in order to qualify as a first edition.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 2:05:19 PM PDT
Erica says:
Kirstin,

The difference between the printings is the copyright page. Although, sometimes publishers will make some edit corrections or change a cover.

Since Scholastic and Bloomsbury are major publishers, a first edition HP will have 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 on the copyright page. Even if it says "first edition" on the copyright page, these numbers are what validate it as a first edition because it indicates the print run. That's why some books will have 20 19 18 17 instead of starting with a 10.

Regarding other printings, in general, some of the other books do have changes. My sister reads it in French and has relayed that not only is the slang changed, the names of the major characters were also changed as well.

As for the "Year" on the spine... that changed in spring or summer 2000. (I happened to be working in a bookstore when it happened). Also check your copyright page as well to make sure your dust jacket and book are in sync. I saw a first edition of this where someone had switched to a later dust jacket because they'd destroyed the original.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 24, 2007 9:41:21 PM PDT
Matt Brand says:
My editions of the book are as follows. i got books 1-4 christmas 2001. Book 1: 50th edition, book 2: 41st edition, book 3: 36th edition, book 4: 13th edition, book 5 1st edition, booke 6 2nd editon (although i got the 1st copy sold at my local borders?) can some1 explain that?, and i got my 7th book in 1st edition i was in the 115th place in line.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2007 12:11:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 25, 2007 12:17:49 AM PDT
obsidianic says:
This is really strange. My Chamber of Secrets has (underscores = space):
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 ____ 9/9 0/0 1 2 3 4
Printed in the U.S.A. ____ 37
First American edition, June 1999

Can it really be the first edition? Because I ordered books 1-3 at the same time (new, standard hardcovers ... not from Amazon) , and it was after Goblet of Fire came out.

Sorcerer's Stone
57 56 55 54 53 52 51 ____ 00 01 02 03 04
Printed in the U.S.A. ____ 10
(There were 51 printings already???)

Prisoner of Azkaban
goes from 42 - 30

All of my books have the Year X on the spine.

BTW, Did these books come out in hardcover originally? In Canada, a friend who was working at Chapters at the time (a large bookstore chain) said that the first three books only came in paperback when they were first printed.

PS. There might be some extra snippets of reviews on the dust cover on later printings (eg. "A delightful award-winning debut from an author who dances in the footsteps of PL Travers and Roald Dahl. -- Publishers Weekly, starred review" ... is written on the back of my Book 1)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2007 10:31:08 PM PDT
Warbler says:
I am confused about this "number on the spine" thing, I just went into a Barnes and Nobles bookstore today, and all of the the hardbacks(books 1 through 7) had numbers on the spine and yet you guys are saying they stopped putting the numbers on the spine in 2000. Also book 7 has the year on the spine, so why are you saying they stopped doing that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2007 9:21:08 AM PDT
oceanmc says:
According to Arthur Levine Books this is how you tell:

How can I tell if my Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone is a first edition, first printing?

Book collectors often write to us and ask how they can determine if they have a first printing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Here are a few signs:

1. On the copyright page, the printing line reads: 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 8 9/9 0/0 01 02

2. There is no "Year 1" in a box on the spine.

3. The back of the dust jacket has a quote from the Guardian, London: "Harry Potter could assume the same near-legendary status as Ronald Dahl's Charlie, of chocolate factory fame."

4. The book is priced at $16.95.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2007 2:37:42 PM PDT
Tigerpaws says:
Kirstin - If your book does not have Year 2 on the spine, that is a good thing. It is probably not only a first edition - but a first printing - Much more valuable. Look for this: The copyright page has the full number line (10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 9/9 0/0 1 2 3 4), and states "First American Edition, June 1999." It also states "Printed in the USA 37". Also the book does not have a volume number on spine of the book. The dustwrapper is marked at a price of $17.95 (and not $19.95) If that's the case, hold on to that copy! Only 250,000 copies were printed in that first run. Those books are selling at around $500-$700 depending on condition. (Check them out on ebay by looking at 1st/1st - not just first edition, but first edition, first printing). Congratulations!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2007 2:42:32 PM PDT
Tigerpaws says:
HP and SS - First printing in US will have these signs:
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (U.S.)
Publisher: Scholastic (Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic Press)
Publish date: October 1998
First Edition Size: 125,000 copies (according to Scholastic)
ISBN: 0-590-35340-3

The copyright page has the full number line (1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 8 9/9 0/0 01 02), and states "First American Edition, October 1998." It also states "Printed in the USA 23".
The "First Edition" statement has been the cause of many misidentified books, as this statement has stayed in all of the printings to date. The determining factor for a First Edition (first printing) is the number line. Also the book does not have a volume number on spine of the book.

The first printing (and all subsequent printings) of the trade edition is in purple boards (covers) with an embossed diamond pattern and has a red cloth spine. Be careful, as there are book club editions on the market with the correct number sequence on the copyright page, but they are in plain black boards (covers).

The first state of the dustwrapper has a blurb from England's "The Guardian" newspaper on the back. Subsequent issues have a blurb from "Publisher's Weekly".

The price on the dustwrapper is $16.95, which was later raised to $17.95. Also, the number "51695" (which corresponds to the price) appears over the bar code on the back of the dustwrapper.

There is no volume number on the spine of the dustwrapper, (The spine and dustjacket do not show "Year 1") and the lettering is slightly raised. The book club edition dustwrapper is readily identifiable, in that the lettering is NOT raised, it lacks the price on the dustwrapper, and the corresponding number over the bar code.

The author's name is given as "J. K. Rowling", rather than the later "Rowling"

Yours sounds like a true 1st/1st! Value $2,000 and above!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2007 2:44:24 PM PDT
Tigerpaws says:
1st/1st identifying info for Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (U.S.):
Publisher: Scholastic
Publish date: September 8, 1999
ISBN: 0-439-13635-0

The copyright page has the full number line (10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 9/9 0/0 1 2 3 4), and states "First American Edition, October 1999." It also states "Printed in the USA 37". As in all of the books, the "First American Edition" statement has been the cause of many misidentified books, as this statement has stayed in all of the printings to date. The determining factor for a First Edition (first printing) is the number line.

The first printing of the trade edition is in green boards (covers) with an embossed diamond pattern and has a purple cloth spine.

This is the first title to be issued with a year number embossed on the book and the dustwrapper spine (it has Year 3). Mary GrandPre illustrated the dustwrapper (dustjacket), which has an issue price of $19.95.

There is one interesting note about this title. It was during the summer of 1999 that the "Harry" craze really took off, especially in the U.S. Originally Scholastic intended to release the book in October, as it had done with "Sorcerer's Stone". The problem was that "Azkaban" had already been released in the U.K., and many American buyers were purchasing the U.K. version over the web. So Scholastic, fearing that it was losing too many sales, pushed up the "street date" on this title. Hence, we list the publish date (which is the date the book is released for sale, or the street date) as Sept 8, 1999. The copyright, though, states the first American edition to be in October.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2007 3:37:23 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 26, 2007 3:49:08 PM PDT
I wouldn't discount the value of ANY of your 1st edition books, regardless of the print run. If the book is 1st Edition - 1st Printing, in the future it will be worth a lot of money, especially as a 1st Print run as well. As a bookstore owner I am often surprised at the amount of money fans will pay for 1st Edition Harry Potter. I could send my son to college EASILY with the amount of money I have made from the 1st Editions of the first 3 Potter books. Just go to Alibris and look at what a 1st Ed of the Philosopher's Stone from Bloomsbury sells for, and trust me, they're selling those copies that are advertised.

Think 20 million in a print run will offset the cost? Think again. So few people keep their books in mint condition, that the large print runs will actually make the amount go HIGHER because the mint conditions will be rarer as time passes. That's just the name of the game. I've sold 1st Editions of Clive Cussler, Stephen King and Jack Kerouac all for well over the $1000 dollar mark.

The used book business is alive and well thanks to fandom, cult-movies and saga length book series like this.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2007 3:40:38 AM PDT
obsidianic says:
"If your book does not have Year 2 on the spine, that is a good thing. It is probably not only a first edition - but a first printing - Much more valuable. Look for this: The copyright page has the full number line (10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 9/9 0/0 1 2 3 4), and states "First American Edition, June 1999." It also states "Printed in the USA 37". Also the book does not have a volume number on spine of the book. The dustwrapper is marked at a price of $17.95 (and not $19.95)"

Well, I must have some mutant edition, but mine has all those numbers (as mentioned in my previous post), the "Year 2" on the spine, and it says $19.95. It's not a book club edition. It has the diamond checkboard pattern on the cover in blue, with green around the spine. The inks on the spine is silver.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2007 10:48:27 AM PDT
Rob says:
A couple questions regarding the condition in relation to value.

I have 1st/1st copies of the 2nd and 3rd books. The jacket on CoS has no "Year 2" on it, and its price is listed at $17.95. The PoA is also a 1st/1st.

I have had these books for nearly 8-9 years and have read them countless times. In affect, the condition has suffered. The jacket of CoS is ripped a bit on the bottom, and shows very obvious signs of wear. The binding however, is still intact. The jacket of PoA is in much better condition, however the binding of the pages is starting to fail. Pages 33-41 have actually detached from the original binding...not good.

My question is: How do these issues affect the value? Now that I am aware of the value of these books, I will surely keep them in better condition, however I cannot change what has been done. Years from now, will these still sell well, or will the damage greatly reduce the price?

Thanks

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2007 6:44:22 PM PDT
Value of used books is subjective on some levels, because you're trying to determine what someone else will pay or the book. In most cases, based upon what you have stated your books aren't worth much because of the number of times that the book has been read. A tight binding is one of the first things looked at in a quality used book. Some books will actually snap when you open them for the first time and is quite obvious that they haven't been read yet. Torn and damaged dust jackets and dented covers further decrease the value, folded pages, finger smudges, detached pages, etc. The books described would be considered reading copies and not much else.

A good way to look at it is in comparison to comic books or baseball cards, where the owners of such place high value of the care of the item and place them in plastic casings, etc. The bottom line is the better you take care of your books, the more resale value they will have in the future. But if you're there just for the sheer value of reading and enjoying the story then the book to you - as a reader - is priceless.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 29, 2007 6:56:52 AM PDT
Does anyone know if this set is the UK or the American Edition? Thanks!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2007 11:58:37 AM PDT
I bought two Harry Potter 7's and one of them says 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 07 08 09 10 11
Printed in the U.S.A. 23 and the other says 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 07 08 09 10 11
Printed in the U.S.A.56. Which one is the TRUE 1st Edition/1st Printing?

Thank You.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2007 3:27:53 PM PDT
Your guess is as good as mine. I believe the USA 23 and USA 56 remarks to be printing location designations similar to that one coins, etc. With such a large print run of this book, I'm sure that 1st's of Book 7 will end up having places that are more valuable than others. Like USA 1 or USA 13 or some other stuff like that. My copy purchased in Los Angeles, CA says: USA 12.

Value will become clearer as time passes, just try to be one of the people that keeps your books mint.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 2, 2007 11:00:57 AM PDT
R. Bonner says:
My SS appears to be a 1st/1st except one thing: here is what it says:
no year on the spine
priced at $16.95
"51685" serial # on the back
ISBN 0-590-35340-3
"Printed in the U.S.A 23
First American Edition, October 1998

however, the little line of numbers reads:

7 9 10 8 6 8 9/9 0/0 01 02

Interesting, I thought it was supposed to read:

1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 8 9/9 0/0 01 02

What does that mean?
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Participants:  20
Total posts:  34
Initial post:  Jul 23, 2007
Latest post:  Jul 23, 2014

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 4 customers

Search Customer Discussions
This discussion is about
Harry Potter Hardcover Box Set (Books 1-6)
Harry Potter Hardcover Box Set (Books 1-6) by J. K. Rowling (Hardcover - October 1, 2005)
4.6 out of 5 stars   (474)