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on November 25, 2014
This is the scenario.

I'm an audio engineer and I purchased three popular speaker wires in 16 gauge from amazon. Included were AmazonBasics,RCA  and C&E, the first two are copper clad and the third is pure OFC.

I convinced an associate of mine to allow the testing to be done at his facility, which only cost me some time in repair work that he needed done and some lively conversation over a sip of Gentleman Jack when we were finished.

I then lovingly created 6 foot and 30 foot cables of each wire and set out. This engineer's control room is certainly adequate for testing speaker wire.

It's built with no right angles, it uses dual density walls and floor and has bass traps and foam strategically placed to listen in front of his console. We used his mid-field monitors, which are Bag End MM8's that are powered by a Crown Reference 2 amp at about 350 wpc, pretty nice equipment.

We compared the wires against his own, against each other and in the different lengths. We listened to tracks in mono, we listened to samples, we tried drum tracks and piano.

We both agreed that there was a tiny difference in sound between his $250 cables and 30 feet of 16 gauge. We also agreed that 6 feet of 16 gauge made no difference. But we also couldn't say that the change in sound was bad, only that we thought that it did change.

The real problem came when we tried to decide about the extremes. Using 6 feet of pure OFC and 30 feet of copper clad or the opposite. Neither of us felt positive that there was any difference. We called in a third pair of ears and they were simply asked to listen to a song in mono through each speaker with the ability to turn either speaker off. But they were not told why. When asked if they sounded the same they said " Of course it did, it was the same song from the same speakers, why wouldn't it?". Okay....

People can buy whatever product that they choose to. I'm satisfied that at up to 30 feet, the cheapest 16 gauge's sound quality is adequate. There would also be little reason for many not to spend 2 ½ times more on pure OFC, because it's still not a lot of money for some to spend, I would spend more for longer lengths because I always have. If you try to break the wires with repetitive bending, copper clad will break before pure copper, but it takes a lot of bending.

After testing in a designed room using studio grade equipment, I think it unlikely that the equipment that most use in the listening area's that they listen to it, is going to show any recognizable difference with upgraded speaker wire.

But possibly the most interesting thing was that in the one setup that we were sure was different, 30 feet of copper clad and his pro cables, I couldn't say anything about better or worse, only slightly different. If he used cheap wire, no one would walk in and say that his system sounded bad.

Now you know what I know.

I have no recommendation for you because I understand that some people do not believe that advertising is purchased by a product seller to get you to buy their product, some enjoy infomercials and some just go with the flow. So the decision is completely yours.

I would say to you that of all the equipment and wiring used in audio reproduction...That as long as you follow common sense rules, speaker wire may be the least important piece of it by several times over.

This C&E is good wire, if pure copper is your choice for wiring. I would be comfortable running a 30% longer run with this vs copper clad, because of it's lower resistance.
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on January 16, 2017
With my 2015 F150 audio upgrade project in mind, I have purchased the "Rockville RWK4CU 4 AWG Gauge" Amp kit but I was worried about running out of speaker wire since the kit only include 21' and looking at the size of the car, I decided to get some more cable.
The cable right out of the box looks of great quality and seems to be a true 14 gauge.
I have read hundreds of articles and ultimately decided to go for oxygen free copper wire since it is the best in terms of quality and to avoid any risks later on.
This is pretty heavy - I would say more than 4 pounds - and is a great deal considering its quality and length.
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on January 3, 2017
It's quite possible that this speaker cable is overkill for my application (and yours). I'm using it to connect my A/V receiver to my theater speakers. My longest wire run is about 40' and my shortest is 20'. My speakers have nice connectors and were no issue. I needed to use good banana plugs on the receiver end, though, because its plugs really couldn't handle the size of this wiring.

All that said, I have no doubt at all that the speaker wire is not now - and never will be - the limiting factor in my theater's impressive sound. For me that was well worth the minor additional cost.
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on June 25, 2017
Hey, what cay you say? It's wire. The quality is good, and price was right. Just be sure your speaker and output device can handle 14 gauge. Many low power setups have smaller connectors, because they don't need wire this big. If your connectors can't handle it, or you are always going to listen at normal human volumes, you are just wasting your money. Figure it this way. 14 gauge can safely handle 13 amps continuously. At 120V, which is 1560 watts. People normally listen to music below about 50 watts. Hearing doesn't go up linearly (it's logarithmic) but this is nowhere near the wire's capabilities. Unless you like ear splitting volumes, have speaker wiring runs in the hundreds of feet range, or have been tested to have incredibly sensitive hearing ability,14 gauge or lower is wasting your money.
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on February 1, 2014
Used this stuff when upgrading my home theater system from whatever I had before (think it was 14 or 16 gauge that I got by the foot from Home Depot about 10+ years ago when I used to work there in college). I also used some of this in my car in the trunk between my 12" 1240w Infinity Sub & the amp. This stuff is THICK! It's good stuff. It was a little difficult to get it into the terminals on the back of my receiver & some Sony 100w bookshelf speakers. I also have a pair of Panasonic smaller speakers for the rears. It was pretty difficult to get the wire to fit into the terminals so I had to modify the terminals slightly to be able to insert the wire.

Audio quality seems improved & more uniform all the way around. I don't really care if it's only a placebo effect, I want to know that all my speakers are connected using very good quality, pure copper 12 gauge speaker wire. I also hooked up a better quality white Monster Cable for the sub in the home theater setup. Sounds a lot better. I was using a normal RCA cable before, no comparison!!! Did the same in my car between the deck & the amp but that works a little differently, Again, I wanted to ensure the best possible audio signal transfer so I bought 2 Mediabridge 15 foot coaxial sub cords for that application for ~$25.

This stuff's shielded well, comes on a nice reel, has one side color coded red to avoid polarity reversal. I used all of it & would buy it again. I would definitely recommend this speaker wire. After I set it all up & routed & hid the wires running to the rear speakers & set up the sub & all, I found myself listening to Channel 703 on my Comcast cable. The EDM music sounding f-ing awesome with the new 12 gauge + Monster sub cable set up. It's thick, like I said. You can definitely feel it running under my rug for the rear speaker connections but it's not super bad.
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on November 6, 2016
This wire has truly seemed to increase the damping of my front 2 12" speakers! I purchased this with 12 pair of Sewell Deadbolt banana plugs! Good combo! I purchased this wire for my surround speaker's (which I haven't purchased yet) because I know it will keep thedamping factor at around 40-45. I have a 30' and 40' run from the receiver to the left and right surrounds. So far, I've used this for my f front and center channels.
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on December 6, 2014
This wire is great! It is pure copper and has high-quality clear PVC sleeving which shows off the beautiful color of the wire itself. I opted for the 12-gauge size to ensure superior sound quality, and for the marginal price difference over 14 and 16, I am confident I made the right decision. I paired this with Monoprice closed-screw banana plugs and the result is a set of high-quality professional-looking cabling. It is a snug fit, but it works and the snugness makes me not worry about the longevity of a secure connection.

I should note that I tried twice to order from the seller "eDragon, Inc" but they failed to ship in a timely manner both times. I went ahead and ordered directly from Amazon and the cable was in my mailbox less than 36 hours later. Save yourself the time and trouble; spend the extra $2 and order this from Amazon directly.
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on June 20, 2015
I looked around for cheap OFC speaker wire to wire up a Take Energy Classic 5.1 set in my living room. This was extremely good value, the right length for what I needed, and has stood up to six months of regular household wear and tear just fine.

I measured twice, cut once and had no surprises during the setup process. It threaded fine through the thin interior channels and tight bends in both the Sanus Systems HTB3 and Atlantic Satellite 77305018 speaker stands, as well as in channeling in my TV stand. (As an aside, I don't think 14AWG cable would have fit in either.) I installed Sewell Deadbolt banana plugs on the amplifier side - no compatibility issues there.

In the six months it's been "installed" (aka: roughly pushed it up against the wall around the side of the room), it has stood up to vacuuming, the couch legs sitting on top of it, things being spilt on it, as well as disconnects and reconnects when rearranging my gear. I didn't notice any corrosion on the ends of the cable when I disconnected the speaker ends for that rearrangement, despite living in a high humidity area.

Seems to do all the things speaker cable is meant to do. Five stars.
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on May 18, 2013
The wire came as advertised. My roll had slightly over 100ft. It has a nice balance of robustness and yet is flexible enough to not be a burden.
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on March 19, 2016
There are two attributes of speaker wire that actually matter when it comes to sound quality: conductor material and conductor size. Copper (the purer the better) is better than aluminum and thicker wire is better than thin. That's it. Don't fall for the BS that certain name brand cables try to feed you (and charge you many, many, times what you should be paying in the process); they literally can, and do, make up unverifiable claims that have no basis in scientific fact (sometimes even inventing technical sounding words) in order to dupe unsuspecting consumers.
That being said, this cable is pure copper, not just aluminum coated with copper like some other cables, and 12 gauge, which is plenty thick (overkill even) for home theater purposes. Oh, and the price is great. In fact, this is less than you might pay for 100ft of plain 12 gauge copper lamp cord. Of Course, aforementioned lamp cord would give you the same sound quality (remember people, material and thickness is all that matters), but this has cool looking clear insulation and is comprised of smaller than normal strands to make it pliable.
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