Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The Economy of British America, 1607-1789 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture) Reprint Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807843512
ISBN-10: 0807843512
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $1.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$14.99 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$43.74 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
19 New from $43.74 26 Used from $14.99
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


SaneBox: Clean up your Inbox in minutes
Learns what email is important to you and filters out what isn't -- saving you hours. Try it FREE
$43.74 FREE Shipping. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Economy of British America, 1607-1789 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture)
  • +
  • Voyagers to the West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution
Total price: $69.85
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

Few studies in any field of American history more successfully define the frontiers of future research.--Stuart Bruchey, Columbia University



"An indispensable volume.--Choice

About the Author

John J. McCusker, currently the Halsell Distinguished Professor of American History and Professor of Economics at Trinity University, is the author of several books, including Rum and the American Revolution and How Much Is That In Real Money?, and Money and Exchange in Europe and America, 1600-1775: A Handbook.

Russell R. Menard, professor of history at the University of Minnesota, is coauthor of Robert Cole's World: Agriculture and Society in Early Maryland.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 537 pages
  • Publisher: University of North Carolina Press; Reprint edition (December 14, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807843512
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807843512
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,146,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
0%
4 star
50%
3 star
50%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In <i>The Economy of British America</i>, John McCusker and Russell Menard analyzed the existing sources on the economic life in the British colonies in the Americas. This analysis included the areas of eastern Canada, the eastern coast of the United States, and a number of British colonies in the Caribbean (or West Indies). Both McCusker and Menard took the existing literature on the subject and not only answer some questions, but help to pose additional questions for future research.

The authors began the book with a discussion of economic theories, specifically the Malthusian theory and the staples theory. The Malthusian theory explains that the economy was mostly affected by a rapid population growth with little structural change. The staples theory explains a surplus or growth of products for an export model for affecting the economy. McCusker and Menard went to great lengths to ensure the work did not favor one theory over the other. They were successful in their attempts. They showed that each theory could explain a variety of fluctuations in the economy. However, without extensive research into local trends, neither theory has the ability to tell the entire story.

The authors tried to plot the course of development of colonial economics. They attempted to translate seventeenth and eighteenth century economics to the modern concept of a gross national product as well as extrapolating the annual rate of growth of the British mainland economy. This included comparing the population growth statistics of the North American and West Indian colonies and estimating the per capita growth of the economy. In Chapter 3, McCusker and Menard showed different variables for possible per capita growth rates.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a good overview of this topic. However, it contains many details and presets them in a somewhat dry way. Therfore it is not easy to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Economy of British America, 1607-1789 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Economy of British America, 1607-1789 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture)