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Nintendo 2DS - Electric Blue
Color: Electric Blue|Change
Price:$107.00+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on October 14, 2013
Nintendo's 3DS handheld has quickly become one of my all-time favorite gaming devices. We're only two and a half years into the console's lifespan, and we've already been treated to several masterpieces so good, they can easily compete with and defeat many home console releases in terms of quality and overall excellence. It has also been a hugely successful venture for Nintendo, but some people have still held off from buying one. Why? Maybe it's the price that has kept people away. Perhaps parents are afraid their children will break the hinges of the 3DS. Admittedly, one of the coolest features of the system, the 3-D effect, isn't for everyone, either due to preference or age. Well, whatever the case, Nintendo has come out with the 2DS to try and appeal to those people. Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: everything about the 2DS has the same high-quality and attention to detail that is to be expected of Nintendo products, but in my opinion, the 2DS pales in comparison to the 3DS XL in almost every way. You should only consider getting a 2DS in specific circumstances. I'll warn you right now, in order to be as informative as reasonably possible, this may be a long review. If you don't like long, detailed reviews, give this one a pass. You've been given fair warning.

Build Quality and Design: The 2DS' design is quite bold, to say the least. Abandoning the classical clamshell design that has been around for nearly a decade since the original DS (or even the Game Boy Advance SP, if you want to go way back, :P) was introduced is pretty gutsy. Here, we get more of a solid slate chuck design. It's a little shorter than the original 3DS folded out, and actually weighs a little less than the 3DS. On the one hand, this design makes the handheld really tough and a lot harder to break, which is great for kids. On the other hand, this design makes the system a lot clunkier to carry around, and really lessens its portability. Not being able to fold the system makes it much more of a dust magnet, and little incidental scratches on the screen over time are more of a likelihood. All that means is you have to be a bit more careful with where you store it and how you handle it. You can also buy really high-quality screen covers for dirt cheap that will protect the screens, so that isn't much of a problem. Instead of folding the system, there's a slider button on the bottom of the system to engage sleep mode. All buttons have a nice click to them, but are lacking any colorized highlights to label the buttons. Instead, it's just indentations showing which button is which, which gives the system a much cheaper feeling than the other 3DS models. The d-pad itself has a shape similar to the 3DS XL's, but is much, much spongier and the clicky nature has been lessened in comparison to the other 3DS model d-pads. Personally, I actually like it more, but whether others will find it to be a negative or positive change is really up to personal preference. Button placement is different as well. Instead of the buttons, d-pad, or circle pad being to the sides of the lower screen, they're much more central and playing the system feels like holding the Wii U's gamepad, which is surprisingly comfortable. The shoulder buttons also help with comfort as they are much bigger than the other 3DS models and wrap very nicely around the top rounded corners of the 2DS. They also have a nice concave groove to them, making holding the system superbly comfortable. My hands used to cramp up a lot with both the 3DS and the 3DSXL and I was forced to buy grips for both systems to be able to play for extended periods or else suffer from crippling pain in my hands, but not so with the 2DS. This is an incredibly comfortable system to hold, regardless of hand size, right out of the box. Overall, the build quality of the 2DS is excellent, despite the jarring nature of its design.

Sound: Unfortunately, one of the worst aspects of the hardware is the sound design. There's only one mono speaker on the left of the system and while the sound from it is just as loud as the other models, it's simply not detailed or distinct enough to match the other 3DS models (and their speakers aren't that amazing by themselves either, but their stereo set-up is much better than the 2DS single speaker by comparison). Trust me, you'll want to get a pair of stereo headphones to use with the system. Personally, most of the time I don't even play my 3DSXL without plugging in a nice headset or a decent set of speakers, so this isn't that big of deal to me. 3DS games are just much more enjoyable with headphones/earphones/earbuds/whatever regardless of which 3DS system you have, at least in my opinion. Still, some will probably be bothered by the mono speaker in the 2DS, so I must mention it. It sounds great with headphones though!

Screens: The screens on the 2DS are the same size as the original 3DS. Despite what I said a little earlier about the screens always being exposed being a small cause for concern, the 2DS' screens seem to be made of a tougher material than the original 3DS screens, which makes them more resistant to scratches by nature. They're also set into the system deeper, making it harder to brush the surface accidentally. The actual quality of the screens are very nice. Colors are vibrant and bright. The sharpness is very crisp and detailed. One of my biggest complaints about the 3DS is that when the 3D is all the way up, there can be really annoying "ghosting" of images in areas where brightness contrast is high. You don't have to worry about that at all on the 2DS, and that is a big positive in its favor. Overall, fantastic screen quality.

Battery Life: The 3D effect can be a major drain on the batteries of the 3DS(XL). Since it's gone here, battery life has been dramatically improved by default. This is a big boon in the 2DS' favor. Now, batteries last at least 7-9 hours per charge, as opposed to the 3DS' 3-5 or the 3DSXL's 4-6 (keep in mind, that's with the 3D all the way up). That's really nice and makes the system less of a hassle on trips. Granted, without 3-D on, the 3DS and XL do last longer, and all 3DS/2DS models last longer when you turn off power draining features like wifi or lower the brightness setting. That been said, I stand by my statement that the 2DS has great battery life by default, about as good as the 3DSXL with its 3-D turned off.

Backwards Compatibility: This is a bit of a mixed bag. While the colors and vibrancy are very nice, the screen size and pixel resolution leave a little bit to be desired. Playing in native resolution makes the screens so small you can't see very much and the bottom screen becomes super cramped. If you don't opt to use the native DS resolution, then you have to deal with the games taking up the whole screen as normal, but with a little bit of blurriness. Is it that big of a problem? Not really, no. Only the biggest sticklers will even notice any blur, let alone be bothered by it, and most will easily be able to enjoy any DS game on their 2DS.

Lack of 3-D and Price Reduction: What is the 3DS without its most distinguishing third-dimensional feature? The 2DS. Is that a problem? For me, it would be because I love the 3-D effect personally. For those who don't like the 3-D, or for the kiddies, it's perfect. The 3DS' stereoscopic effect is not supposed to be used by kids younger than seven or eight. Until now, those young'uns could only play their games with the 3D slider off, and parents had to pay full-price for a system which would have one of its most prominent features unused. What a waste. Now you can spend much less and get pretty much every other good aspect of the 3DS system, including its most important feature: an excellent library of games. This is an idea I can get behind. Aside from the 3-D effect, the 2DS has virtually every other feature the 3DS has. All software aspects, such as wifi connectivity, access to the eshop, and all on-system programs, are here. The 2DS also comes with a nice-sized SD card so you can download a good number of eshop games. At a cool $129.99 (and don't ever pay more than that for this system), all of this is an absolute steal of a deal.

I have to admit, when I first glimpsed the announcement for the 2DS, I was incredulous. What was this clunky monstrosity before me? A 2DS?! Why remove the very thing that defines the 3DS? What's with that slate design? Has Nintendo lost their mind?! As time has gone by, however, I've warmed up to the idea, and got one for certain occasions where I wouldn't be able to bring my 3DSXL. It has worked out well so far. Let me be clear, the 2DS is certainly not for everyone. If you have the funds, then I would invest it on the 3DSXL over the 2DS any day of the week. Ultimately, the 3DS XL is still the best version of Nintendo's current handheld brand. However, if you're the parent of a child who isn't old enough to use the 3DS' stereoscopic visual effect, a monetarily challenged gamer who wants to enjoy the incredible 3DS library, or someone who'd like a cheaper secondary 3DS-type system, then the 2DS is certainly a worthy investment. If you fall into anything resembling those categories, then I heartily recommend the 2DS. I hope you found my review helpful. Thanks for reading. Toodles
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on January 5, 2014
It looks weird. If you think it looks weird, it is because it looks weird. If at a store and you see the Nintendo 2DS' cousins, the 3DS and 3DS XL, with their somehow more intuitive clam shell design sitting right next to the 2DS on the shelf, it just seems like Nintendo did not care about the 2DS and simply made "something" because "eh, why not?" Obviously, the fact that you cannot close your handheld is nothing new; Nintendo had been doing it for years with the Original GameBoy and GameBoy Advance, or even a more contemporary example: the rival PSP. But this is different. It is a square. A large block with childish color options: either bright red or bright blue, even though the majority of the exterior is black (even the back). Subconsciously, realizing that the numeral "2" is a lesser value than "3" may indicate that the 2DS is an inferior product to the 3DS and to a larger degree the 3DS XL. This is, after all, a device that plays all of the DS and 3DS games in only 2D. But is it an inferior product, or is it just marketed to a different segment of the population? Well that depends on who you ask.

So. Who is the Nintendo 2DS for?

Many reviewers are adamant that this handheld device is geared for children. And that is probably true. The "Fisher Price"esque style of its design is somewhat hard to overlook. There's less chance of it breaking because it is a block of plastic. And as very young children are not suppose to play the 3DS (XL) with the 3D function turned on, the 2DS is a natural solution. But still, consider these questions:

Do you own a Nintendo 3DS or 3DS XL?

Do you care about playing games in 3D?

If you have played on or own a 3DS(XL), do you almost always, if not always, play with your 3D function turned off?

Are you a more casual gamer who is looking for something fun to play?

Would you rather pay less money for something so you do not pay extra for functions that you do not or probably will not use?

If you answered "no" to the first two and "yes" to most or all of the rest, then this device is for you. Do not let the fact that people are saying this is for children trap you in some paradigm where you think you are buying Nintendo's answer to a Vtech laptop. This device is easier and safer for children but is enjoyable for everyone. Remember, it's the games you play that matter, not the device. If you are 55 and want to play Call of Duty 4 on a Nintendo DS? You can do it with the Nintendo 2DS. If you are 55 and want to play Spongebob Surf and Skate Roadtrip, you can do that here as well. If you want to have a little bit of nostalgic break and want to carry around portable versions of your N64 favorites, you can even do that as well with a DS system. The point is: pick whichever DS is best for you, but in the end, the 2DS is an option for everybody, not just children.

As of early January, 2014, the 2DS is $40 less expensive than the original 3DS and $70 less than the 3DS XL. That's a big price difference between $40 and $70 for essentially a function that you either will not or cannot use. That is the price of 1 to 2 games depending on which model you end up buying. My 2DS came preloaded with Pokemon X for an extra $20 and I also bought Super Mario 64 DS for $30. So I got a 2DS, Pokemon X (a great game, by the way), and Super Mario 64 DS and paid for taxes - all for less than the base price of the 3DS XL.

Now, granted, the 3DS XL is larger device with much larger screens and does have the ability to close which will better protect the screens. The 3DS and 3DS XL also have the 3D capability which you may find appealing. Do not necessarily buy the 2DS because it is a cheaper version that is still very highly rated, although that is a strong selling point. Do your research. Find out which DS is the best version for you or the person that you will be giving this to. These are investments to some extent, very minor and completely trivial compared to a car or a house, but investments nonetheless. The 3DS XL currently costs $200 but even the $130 2DS is not exactly a $1 candy bar.

The design is obviously more square-like from the front (and back) view and is wedged shaped from a profile view (larger at the top of the device and smaller as you near the bottom). It is light and fairly well built, though possibly could have been a little sturdier. The screens are the same size as the original 3DS. The buttons and control pads are placed much higher than the 3DSs but are very easy to handle and game play is comfortable. The included stylus is housed in the middle of the right hand side of the device and is easily accessible. The only thing that has been difficult, and this could be my specific device, is the home button, located at the bottom of the lower screen in the middle, is not as responsive as it should be. I have had to press it several times, hard, before it does what is it suppose to do: take the user back to the home screen. But this may be a precautionary measure to make sure you do not accidentally press it while playing a game. Battery life is good but not great. Depending on which source you read and what games you supposedly play, the battery can last between 3 and 9 hours, so I am not really sure on the actual number. I can play about 4ish hours before it dies. The 2DS does last longer when playing DS games as opposed to 3DS games. Charging the battery takes about 3 hours.

If you are new to the 2/3DS family, here is basic breakdown of the 3 current models:

3DS: Oldest model, plays games in 3D but 3D function can be turned off, clam shell design, costs about $170.

3DS XL: Newest 3D model, plays games in 3D but 3D function can be turned off, clam shell design, larger screens than its original counterpart, new design overall, costs about $200.

2DS: Latest model, plays all DS games and 3DS games in the 2-dimensional format only, slate design, screens are the same size as the original 3DS, costs about $130.

A quick point about the game nomenclature: a game that says it is for the Nintendo DS is a game that was made for the original DS family of devices, a group that predated the release of the original 3DS. A game that says its for the 3DS merely means that it capable of being played in 3D and can be played on the 3DS, 3DS XL or 2DS. The 3DS, 3DS XL and 2DS will play all DS and 3DS games, but the 2DS can only play the games in 2D.

I researched the 2DS, I bought it, I love it. Read other reviews, watch YouTube videos that show the unboxing of the device and the actual utilization of the device. If you are hesitant about getting a 3DS or a 3DS XL, get the latter. For $30 more you get much larger screens and a better overall design. But if you are considering 2DS or any 3DS, really consider 2 main points: up to $70 less and will you really use the 3D function. The Nintendo 2DS is a great little device and is the most threatening plot to kill productivity since the invention of streaming Netflix. Just do your research, really take a look at what you want and need, and you should be happy with whatever device you buy.
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on May 15, 2016
Ugly. When this was released I was totally perplexed and almost angry because it seemed so pared down and ugly. I love handhelds and have had every itteration of the Game Boy Nintendo has ever made...some seemed mediocre and others great. The original 3ds I got at launch was not comfortable to hold for long periods until I added the Nerf armor which made it larger. My 3ds xl is the perfect handheld for me.....hundreds of hours on the system and it has held up very well. It also has a ton of downloaded games on it (which sometimes causes me to leave it home rather than risk damage or theft). I got a great deal on the 2ds, used BUT after spending just a few days with it, I decided it is one of my favorites.
I am like many people who rarely use the 3ds option. I found it completely nauseating on the original 3ds and only slightly better with the larger 3ds xl screens. So, if 3d isn't important to you, this is a great system period. 3ds xl in comparrison feels much heavier after playing for an hour or more. I am including this side by side picture of the size difference when the 3ds xl is open. The 2ds feels really comfortable for longer play to me and if you like or have or want games that use those shoulder buttons a lot it is a winner....very good size, comfortable and responsive. Mario Kart 7 is a blast on it. The lack of stereo from the one speaker doesn't really bother me....if I want stereo I plug in my headphones. The 2ds reminds me of the Game Boy because it is large. I am a big fan of the clamshell designs BUT there is no hinge here to get loose or break AND nothing wiggles and jiggles while playing race, fighting, or other games where you might have a tendency to jostle the system around some. That alone makes it unique and fun....I don't feel I need to be as careful with it, either. This system feels solid. I don't have a problem with these small screens since there is no floppy hinge. I do suggest screen protectors and a case. This will fit in cargo pants pockets and maybe the back pocket of guy's jeans. With the new price drop, I think everyone should consider it because it is a great system and the library of ds and 3ds games is incredible. I actually recommend this system over 3ds xl....the price point is SO much better it makes this a must have and I have been totally satisfied with mine. Hope you enjoy yours.
review image
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on October 15, 2013
Nintendo's 3DS handheld has quickly become one of my all-time favorite gaming devices. We're only two and a half years into the console's lifespan, and we've already been treated to several masterpieces so good, they can easily compete with and defeat many home console releases in terms of quality and overall excellence. It has also been a hugely successful venture for Nintendo, but some people have still held off from buying one. Why? Maybe it's the price that has kept people away. Perhaps parents are afraid their children will break the hinges of the 3DS. Admittedly, one of the coolest features of the system, the 3-D effect, isn't for everyone, either due to preference or age. Well, whatever the case, Nintendo has come out with the 2DS to try and appeal to those people. Let's get one thing straight right off the bat: everything about the 2DS has the same high-quality and attention to detail that is to be expected of Nintendo products, but in my opinion, the 2DS pales in comparison to the 3DS XL in almost every way. You should only consider getting a 2DS in specific circumstances. I'll warn you right now, in order to be as informative as reasonably possible, this may be a long review. If you don't like long, detailed reviews, give this one a pass. You've been given fair warning.

Build Quality and Design: The 2DS' design is quite bold, to say the least. Abandoning the classical clamshell design that has been around for nearly a decade since the original DS (or even the Game Boy Advance SP, if you want to go way back, :P) was introduced is pretty gutsy. Here, we get more of a solid slate chuck design. It's a little shorter than the original 3DS folded out, and actually weighs a little less than the 3DS. On the one hand, his design makes the handheld really tough and a lot harder to break, which is great for kids. On the other hand, this design makes the system a lot clunkier to carry around, and really lessens its portability. Not being able to fold the system makes it much more of a dust magnet, and little incidental scratches on the screen over time are more of a likelihood. All that means is you have to be a bit more careful with where you store it and how you handle it. You can also buy really high-quality screen covers for dirt cheap that will protect the screens, so that isn't much of a problem. Instead of folding the system, there's a slider button on the bottom of the system to engage sleep mode. All buttons have a nice click to them, but are lacking any colorized highlights to label the buttons. Instead, it's just indentations showing which button is which, which gives the system a much cheaper feeling than the other 3DS models. The d-pad itself has a shape similar to the 3DS XL's, but is much, much spongier and the clicky nature has been lessened in comparison to the other 3DS model d-pads. Personally, I actually like it more, but whether others will find it to be a negative or positive change is really up to personal preference. Button placement is different as well. Instead of the buttons, d-pad, or circle pad being to the sides of the lower screen, they're much more central and playing the system feels like holding the Wii U's gamepad, which is surprisingly comfortable. The shoulder buttons also help with comfort as they are much bigger than the other 3DS models and wrap very nicely around the top rounded corners of the 2DS. They also have a nice concave groove to them, making holding the system superbly comfortable. My hands used to cramp up a lot with both the 3DS and the 3DSXL and I was forced to buy grips for both systems to be able to play for extended periods or else suffer from crippling pain in my hands, but not so with the 2DS. This is an incredibly comfortable system to hold, regardless of hand size, right out of the box. Overall, the build quality of the 2DS is excellent, despite the jarring nature of its design.

Sound: Unfortunately, one of the worst aspects of the hardware is the sound design. There's only one mono speaker on the left of the system and while the sound from it is just as loud as the other models, it's simply not detailed or distinct enough to match the other 3DS models (and their speakers aren't that amazing by themselves either, but their stereo set-up is much better than the 2DS single speaker by comparison). Trust me, you'll want to get a pair of stereo headphones to use with the system. Personally, most of the time I don't even play my 3DSXL without plugging in a nice headset or a decent set of speakers, so this isn't that big of deal to me. 3DS games are just much more enjoyable with headphones/earphones/earbuds/whatever regardless of which 3DS system you have, at least in my opinion. Still, some will probably be bothered by the mono speaker in the 2DS, so I must mention it. It sounds great with headphones though!

Screens: The screens on the 2DS are the same size as the original 3DS. Despite what I said a little earlier about the screens always being exposed being a small cause for concern, the 2DS' screens seem to be made of a tougher material than the original 3DS screens, which makes them more resistant to scratches by nature. They're also set into the system deeper, making it harder to brush the surface accidentally. The actual quality of the screens are very nice. Colors are vibrant and bright. The sharpness is very crisp and detailed. One of my biggest complaints about the 3DS is that when the 3D is all the way up, there can be really annoying "ghosting" of images in areas where brightness contrast is high. You don't have to worry about that at all on the 2DS, and that is a big positive in its favor. Overall, fantastic screen quality.

Battery Life: The 3D effect can be a major drain on the batteries of the 3DS(XL). Since it's gone here, battery life has been dramatically improved by default. This is a big boon in the 2DS' favor. Now, batteries last at least 7-9 hours per charge, as opposed to the 3DS' 3-5 or the 3DSXL's 4-6 (keep in mind, that's with the 3D all the way up). That's really nice and makes the system less of a hassle on trips. Granted, without 3-D on, the 3DS and XL do last longer, and all 3DS/2DS models last longer when you turn off power draining features like wifi or lower the brightness setting. That been said, I stand by my statement that the 2DS has great battery life by default, about as good as the 3DSXL with its 3-D turned off.

Backwards Compatibility: This is a bit of a mixed bag. While the colors and vibrancy are very nice, the screen size and pixel resolution leave a little bit to be desired. Playing in native resolution makes the screens so small you can't see very much and the bottom screen becomes super cramped. If you don't opt to use the native DS resolution, then you have to deal with the games taking up the whole screen as normal, but with a little bit of blurriness. Is it that big of a problem? Not really, no. Only the biggest sticklers will even notice any blur, let alone be bothered by it, and most will easily be able to enjoy any DS game on their 2DS.

Lack of 3-D and Price Reduction: What is the 3DS without its most distinguishing third-dimensional feature? The 2DS. Is that a problem? For me, it would be because I love the 3-D effect personally. For those who don't like the 3-D, or for the kiddies, it's perfect. The 3DS' stereoscopic effect is not supposed to be used by kids younger than seven or eight. Until now, those young'uns could only play their games with the 3D slider off, and parents had to pay full-price for a system which would have one of its most prominent features unused. What a waste. Now you can spend much less and get pretty much every other good aspect of the 3DS system, including its most important feature: an excellent library of games. This is an idea I can get behind. Aside from the 3-D effect, the 2DS has virtually every other feature the 3DS has. All software aspects, such as wifi connectivity, access to the eshop, and all on-system programs, are here. The 2DS also comes with a nice-sized SD card so you can download a good number of eshop games. At a cool $129.99 (and don't ever pay more than that for this system), all of this is an absolute steal of a deal.

I have to admit, when I first glimpsed the announcement for the 2DS, I was incredulous. What was this clunky monstrosity before me? A 2DS?! Why remove the very thing that defines the 3DS? What's with that slate design? Has Nintendo lost their mind?! As time has gone by, however, I've warmed up to the idea, and got one for certain occasions where I wouldn't be able to bring my 3DSXL. It has worked out well so far. Let me be clear, the 2DS is certainly not for everyone. If you have the funds, then I would invest it on the 3DSXL over the 2DS any day of the week. Ultimately, the 3DS XL is still the best version of Nintendo's current handheld brand. However, if you're the parent of a child who isn't old enough to use the 3DS' stereoscopic visual effect, a monetarily challenged gamer who wants to enjoy the incredible 3DS library, or someone who'd like a cheaper secondary 3DS-type system, then the 2DS is certainly a worthy investment. If you fall into anything resembling those categories, then I heartily recommend the 2DS. I hope you found my review helpful. Thanks for reading. Toodles
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on March 4, 2016
Cheap but amazing! You get to play all of nintendos great games without breaking the bank. As a gentleman in his 20's, this can sometimes hurt my hands. I have large hands and it feels as though they get crunched (Lol, great adjective) after 20+minutes. You get what you pay for so it is still great! Thinking about it... This is meant for a child so... Should be a great fit!!:)
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on September 29, 2017
I purchased this for my oldest daughter's birthday. She loves it. Her little sister loves it. I love it, so I got the New 2DS XL. This is a great starter console for young kids. It is durable, has technical applications that test children's ability to take care of a video game console. Most of all... It is cheap! Pick one up for $80 or less with Mario Kart 7 or New Super Mario Brothers 2 pre installed. I plan on getting my youngest daughter the latter, since she likes red, and the newest deal is red and white with New Super Mario Brothers II already installed.
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on April 13, 2015
I got the product on time, and it plays great. I actually love the 2DS, because it's far more comfortable than the 3DS or 3DS XL to hold, especially if you have large hands. If you buy trigger grips for it (available at gamestop, at least?), it becomes even more comfortable. I bought the 2DS mostly to play Super Smash Bros, but I have been exploring other 3DS games more than I expected. The 2DS is way better for Smash than the 3DS in my opinion, and the trigger grips make it almost as comfortable as a gamecube controller.

I still find it fairly pocketable in hoodie weather and winter, since I can shove it easily into any pocket. It may be a bit more troublesome to carry during the summer, but even then it fits in most of my pants, albeit barely. I don't miss the 3D at all, and in fact, the screen seems brighter than any 3DS I've used, at highest brightness.

All in all, I would highly recommend this product.
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on April 21, 2016
If you are thinking about purchasing a ds this is a great start and great for the price as well. It can pretty much play any ds game and everything the 3ds can do except the 3D part. Another thing I love about this is it feels very comfortable and easy on your hands while playing. The L and R buttons and right at the top and just makes everything so easy. If you're looking to buy a ds but don't wanna spend a lot, go with this one!
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on June 8, 2014
Well worth the price. If you want to save money or if you get dizzy playing the 3DS in 3D mode like I do, this product is perfect for you. It's exactly the same as the 3DS, with all the fun and perks minus the 3D gameplay and extra cost. It comes with a user manual, mini games and tons of cool free features, and of course the stylus, which seems to hold up well even with extended use. My only recommendation would be to buy a case and/or cleaning cloth to keep it in good condition - you don't want to damage a catch like this!
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on June 14, 2017
The awesomeness of the 3DS but without the headache causing 3D screen (3D screens hurt my eyes and head, but that might not be true to everyone)
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