Automotive Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Clothing Learn more Discover it Pink Floyd Fire TV Stick Health, Household and Grocery Back to School Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Introducing new colors All-New Kindle Oasis Enter for the chance to win front row seats to Barbra Streisand Segway miniPro

#403: Nummi

From the Album #403: Nummi
March 26, 2010 | Format: MP3

$1.29
Song Title
Time
 
30
1:01:16
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.com (US).
  

Product Details

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
This American Life is a very informative and entertaining radio show. This particular episode explains how the American car industry lost it's edge in the car market and what must change to get it back. The explanations are simple and easy to understand, and has many suggestions on how to fix the problem.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
This is a very well done (classic NPR style) deep study of an important aspect of work culture and the economy, and the broader subject of the weaknesses of subjective human psychology. This program has some great lessons about teamwork and leadership, as well as making your job satisfaction align and connect with your company’s success. The interviews are deeply insightful, and capture the complex nuances that made the difference between a cliche-shallow understanding of the GM bankruptcy, and the long-term effect that NUMMI had on gradually changing "the way we do thing here at GM".

A logical fallacy, the decision-making reason "That's not the way we do things here at XYZ" is a common, intellectually dishonest justification for failing to analyze and deploy better processes. It is, regrettably, a failing of human nature to take refuge in the security of the system you know.

I hope hearing this true story inspires courage and perseverance in every person who faces resistance to the improvement of business processes. We are a great nation partly because we can eschew the false pride of our prejudices, and remain open-minded to improvements and innovation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
This is an hour-long story about an improbable partnership between General Motors and Toyota to jointly run an auto plant in Fremont, California. The JV was formed in 1984 and ran the plant until its closing in April 2010. It was called New United Motor Manufacturing Inc., but everyone called it "NUMMI." It's a fascinating narrative, with interviews of workers, labor leaders, management from the plant and business school faculty. This is one of the best radio pieces you'll ever hear. Although the two companies were fierce competitors, each needed the other at the time. GM needed to learn how to build high-quality small cars efficiently. Toyota had never made a car in America and wanted a local partner for its first plant here. Toyota chose GM's Fremont assembly plant, which had been closed down as one of the worst-performing factories in the country. Interviews with workers recounted incidents of drugs, sex, intentional sabotaging of cars, absenteeism so massive that managers would run down to the local bar to round up day workers, and constant labor-management fights. Contrary to almost everyone's advice, Toyota re-hired the vast majority of what was reputed to be one of the worst work forces in the auto industry. These blue-collar, hard-drinking American workers were sent to Japan to train alongside Japanese workers in Toyota City to learn the Toyota Way. Tape from those trips revealed a remarkable transformation. Almost from the day it opened, the NUMMI plant had the highest quality of any auto plant in the U.S. Its operations were radically different from any auto plant in America. During its lifetime, the plant produced 8 million high-quality cars, mostly Toyota Corollas. This program tells how this transformation was accomplished, why GM failed to learn from it and why Toyota knew GM could not copy the Toyota Way (ultimately leading to GM's bankruptcy). The story is told by Frank Langfit in a joint production by NPR and WBEZ/This American Life.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
I am planning to use this s the platform of a CEO workshop.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
Perfect
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?