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2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake by [Gibson, William, Ono, Yoko, Eisler, Barry, Adelstein, Jake, The quakebook community]
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2:46: Aftershocks: Stories from the Japan Earthquake Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 101 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • File Size: 1757 KB
  • Print Length: 105 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0956883621
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: April 12, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004VP3KHK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,087 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm in no way an objective reviewer of this book since I contributed a piece to it and I know many of the people who brought it together. On March 11th at 2:46 pm, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake, followed by massive tsunami devastated Japan and nuclear reactors in Fukushima Prefecture. The estimated death toll is expected to reach 40,000. It is a tragedy of such magnitude that it's hard to wrap your head around it. Numbers are numbers. They have no face; it is hard to feel for figures. Quakebook tells the story of this earthquake and the aftermath in art, essays, short memoirs, and photographs. Each story is moving its own way. There are accounts from those who directly suffered, those who were left in limbo waiting to find out if their loved ones were missing or dead. There are stories of those who could not but help leave Japan after the earthquake as well. Some of the essays are painful to read. The piece "Positive" is simply about one man watching a news broadcast of a rescue attempt going badly and how he could not watch the rest. If you read it, you'll understand why. There are some thing we do not want to know but perhaps should know. That's for each person to decide. It is not only a book of mourning; it is a book of hope. The book came into existence because one man felt like he could not stand by and do nothing. This book began with his idea and took shape through the hard work of many others. People made enormous sacrifices to make this book into a reality.
Amazon went to great lengths to ensure that all proceeds from this book go directly to the Japan Red Cross, which aids the victims in Japan in many ways. They are not taking a single cent. It is a tremendous act of corporate altruism.
The writing quality in the book is uneven.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I followed the events that led to the creation of that book from TV and from the Internet. As the book was written by people who experienced the quake, tsunami and nuclear event, I find it very moving when reading.

In each page, in each testimonial, in each picture, I feel the pain and the hope of all. It is not a book you can or need to read from cover to cover. Browsing is also an alternate way of reading.

Reading this book is also a way for all to fund the Red Cross of Japan.
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Format: Kindle Edition
It may be premature to call this ebook a phenomenon, but it has long succeeded the level of mere amazing achievement. What began as the efforts of one man to chronicle the short stories of those who experienced the Great Eastern Japan has grown into a global community and movement to raise awareness of the people affected and how we all can help. This is not an easy read. However, if you want to come closer to understanding the moment Japan's trajectory was forever altered, you need to read this book. More importantly, if you want to understand more about the remarkable spirit of the Japanese people, you need to read this book. What can you do to help Japan recover - read this book.
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By Raven on April 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am amazed by the quality of the writing and powerful emotions this book evokes.

This is more than just a collection of stories to raise money to help those affected by the recent earthquake and tsunami. This book is also a snapshot today's world and the power of social media.

This book came together so quickly; people around the world contributed to this project via technology. A month (almost to the minute) after I heard about the great quake, I was able to download this book to my kindle. As soon as it downloaded, I sat and read the entire book. I couldn't put it down. It's very powerful to me to think of how the book was produced and make reading it all that more poignant.

The quality of the writing is excellent. These are first hand accounts by people who experienced the events. The photos and illustrations show clearly on my Kindle 3. There is an interactive menu (which is always good). The only improvement I might suggest, is to make it so that one can flip between stories using the 5-way controller.

I would recommend this book to everyone. It's the first item to receive a 5 star review from me. In my opinion, it's worth far more than that.

Well done everyone who contributed to this project.
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I'm amazed at the speed with which the creators of this moving account of the Touhoku quake were able to put the book together, proud to have contributed the foreword, and grateful to Amazon for ensuring that 100% of the proceeds go to earthquake and tsunami relief in Japan. As I say in the foreword: "If my books have been love letters to Japan, this one is more an SOS." Thanks for heeding it.
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I'm sorry to say that my view of this book is aligned with many of the other 1 to 3 star reviewers--the stories (being really short, some of them only 1 paragraph) get a bit boring after a while, because they don't have much depth.

Maybe they shouldn't have much depth, since the whole book was thrown together in a week as a collection of really short viewpoints and stories from anyone who wanted to participate. As another reviewer pointed out, many of the viewpoints were from people located far from the disaster, musing or wondering about their own introspections and feelings about the event.

It seems to me the book would have been stronger if at least the shortest and most irrelevant viewpoints had been tossed out, and if some of the repetitive stories of buildings swaying had been removed unless they offered a unique perspective.

So as an interesting book for the general reader, I think this book falls well short of the mark, unless you are specifically looking for the distant viewpoints of mostly writers and journalists and English speaking people who were on the fringes (or further) of the disaster.

But nonetheless, maybe the book did achieve its stated goal--to raise some money for relief efforts.
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