Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Abandon the Old in Tokyo Hardcover – September 5, 2006

4.4 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.50 $1.78

Comic-Con Deal: Up to 50% off select Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Comic books
Featured titles are up to 50% off for a limited time. See all titles
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. The second volume of Drawn and Quarterly's ambitious reprinting of selected works by manga master Tatsumi picks up where the first left off. This outing once again showcases Tatsumi's pitch-perfect psychodramas, but this time with stories that are a bit more ambitious and sure-footed. Tatsumi more or less invented his own genre, making compelling manga out of everyday moments that otherwise pass unnoticed. His characters are anonymous faces we pass on the street, and he gives them an unsuspected inner life. In the opening story an artist for children's stories discovers a new, sinister vocation until he's found out. In another story a man is held captive by a woman who blames all men for her own psychological (and physical) scars. And in still another, an old man, once a proud business owner, returns to his derelict office day after day, despite the end of his company. Tatsumi lends all of these characters sympathetic voices through his minimal dialogue and deft line work. No one captures urban Japan quite like Tatsumi—even the streets feel nuanced. This collection of seminal work by a comics master is essential reading for anyone interested in the artistic development of the medium. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* The stories in editor Tomine's second collection of this groundbreaking comics creator originally appeared in 1970, when Japan had recovered from the psychic setback of World War II and embarked on its "economic miracle." Tatsumi reveals, however, a segment of Japanese society that remained defeated, made up of weary, emasculated, working-class men, often paired with resentful women. In the title story, a frustrated truck driver taking care of his decrepit, demanding mother reaches his limit. In others, a disgraced businessman returns to his deserted office every day, long after the company has gone under, and a burned-out children's manga artist turns his talents to more disreputable pursuits. It's hard not to read an autobiographical element into that last one, related to the fact that Tatsumi combined the words for drama and art to coin a term,gekiga, for his work to set it apart from comics aimed at children. His powerful drawing style depicts the characters with a starkness and simplicity that matches what is presented of their lives and conjures a convincing urban milieu through detailed backdrops. These decades-old tales are unlike anything published in the U.S. before or since, and it's gratifying that America is now finally catching up with Tatsumi's genius. Gordon Flagg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Drawn and Quarterly; First Edition edition (September 5, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1894937872
  • ISBN-13: 978-1894937870
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #312,481 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 16, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Yoshihiro Tatsumi, Abandon the Old in Tokyo (Drawn and Quarterly, 2006)

"The more we jam ourselves together, the more isolated we all are." I still have no idea why it is that some authors would pen a line like this and have it be utter trash, while a select few-- the redoubtable Yoshihiro Tatsumi among them-- can make it sound like the deepest sort of philosophic meditation... and get away with it.

This is the second compendium of Tatsumi's work to be published in America (the first was The Push Man and Other Stories), and all I can say is "it's about bloody time." This is amazing work. Tatsumi mentions in the interview after the stories that he was entirely unaware of the "underground comix" movement in America at the time he was drawing these stories; it's amazing that he developed independently along the same lines of thought as they did, but that seems to be what happened. Tatsumi's stories are the same kind of slice-of-life thing, but with less of a drug atmosphere and more pessimism (I want to say "nihilism," there, but it's not quite right; there is a sense of hope in some of these stories, however quickly it may be crushed). The end result is small, profoundly affecting pieces of work that command the reader to devour them. If you haven't had the pleasure of encountering the work of Yoshihiro Tatsumi yet-- and most of us in America haven't-- you owe it to yourself to make his acquaintance. **** ½
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Abandon the Old in Tokyo is a collection of dark stories of the ghosts that can haunt "ordinary" city life. The people and situations seem entirely familiar in spite of the unfamiliar Tokyo surroundings and desperate, often obsessively fetishistic relationships. Tatsumi's art seems limited at first glance (many characters share the same "inexpressive" face), but he brings out an amazing array of emotions and keen observations. More than once I was reminded of Poe -- self-absorbed people caught in their own private hells. Not for the easily offended, but if you like David Lynch or Chuck Palahnuik, you'll feel uncomfortably at home.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Comics. Traditionally, that word conjured up puerile images of fuzzy bunnies or birdies bouncing into harmless cute mischief. Many thought that only children should read such banalities. Few, especially in the Unites States, where comics "grew up" relatively late, could imagine that this often simply drawn art form had the capability of dealing with deep existential or even starkly morbid topics. Cute comics definitely have their place, but they do not exhaust the entire medium. Enter "gekiga," a term coined by Japanese artist Yoshihiro Tatsumi to describe a comic genre aimed largely at adults, or at least at mature audiences. This untrodden path led to murky unexplored corners of human society and psychology drawn in unforgettable imagery that provides an often disturbing portrayal of the alienation of modern life. Never extremely popular, perhaps for obvious reasons, the stories nonetheless made their way into print in mid-20th century Japan. For decades they remained nearly unknown and ignored until comics around the world evolved and others realized that a certain artist in Japan may have actually foreshadowed the future. By the first decade of the 21st century, collections of "gekiga" appeared in comic stores, compliments of "Drawn and Quarterly," who published many never before seen classics in English. Three volumes in particular celebrated the work of Tatsumi. This series' second volume, "Abandon the Old in Tokyo," though its stories were written around 1970, still resonate in today's industrial workaday world, in which many people find themselves lost, abandoned or simply confused.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
super smart and down to earth- all the nitty gritty that most people don't see or choose to ignore as part of their actual lives, all here in hnest simplistic poetic beauty. a timeless classic for sure.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thanks to the dedicated individuals that brought the work of Yoshihiro Tatsumi. You have done the English-reading public a great service in bringing such fine narrative artistry to the audience outside Japan. These are poignant stories that stay with you visually and emotionally in memory.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
When I put this book down it was with a sense of "Oh Wow", sometimes you run into a book that is insightful and impacts how you view things in life. Abandon the Old in Tokyo is an amazing experience in reading, and one that should not be missed. Definitely not for kids, absolutely for adults or anyone over 18, and one of those few books that leaves a mark, even if you only read the first 20 pages.

The book is a collection of stories that cover much of what Yoshihiro has seen or drawn about in other books or magazines. The cast of stories and characters takes a look at much of the human drama, concerns and choices that people make when dealing with issues that at times are overwhelming, and at times startlingly sweet and rare. From love to incest, from failed dreams to realized success, these stories reach out to the reader and say "you have been here, you know these people, and these people are you". That is why this book is fundamentally amazing, and well worth picking up and reading.

The premise of Abandon the Old in Tokyo is to take the best work from Yoshihiro Tatsumi and condense his stories into a book format. Usually these kinds of books can be disjointed, but the editors at Drawn and Quarterly have done a great job tying the subject matter together so that the book has a natural feel when the reader is moving from story to story. You cannot help but feel that you are holding a master work in your hands, and read real human drama with real human consequences. All master story tellers help you become part of the story line; this book is no exception to that standard. I rate this book five of five stars, because you cannot walk away from this book. It is difficult to put down; it is difficult to let it go. Probably the most amazing book you will read this year, making it one of the most important books you can purchase this year.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?