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Comment: The Cover, Binder and all pages are in great condition. There is light discoloring to the outside Cover. International Shipper also! Over 4000+ Sales!
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Acres of Diamonds Mass Market Paperback – October 15, 1986

4.4 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Russell Herman Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia.

The original inspiration for his most famous essay, "Acres of Diamonds," occurred in 1869 when Conwell was traveling in the Middle East. The work began as a speech, "at first given," wrote Conwell in 1913, "before a reunion of my old comrades of the Forty-sixth Massachusetts Regiment, which served in the Civil War and in which I was captain."

The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune—the resources to achieve all good things are present in one's own community.

Conwell's name lives on in the present-day Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, located in South Hamilton, Massachusetts.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Jove; Reissue edition (October 15, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 051509028X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0515090284
  • Product Dimensions: 4.3 x 0.2 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,207,992 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 6, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Toward the end of his life, Russell H. Conwell (1843-1925) observed, "I am astonished that so many people should care to hear this story over again. Indeed, this lecture has become a study in psychology; it often breaks all rules of oratory, departs from the precepts of rhetoric, and yet remains the most popular of any lecture I have delivered in the fifty-seven years of my public life. I have sometimes studied for a year upon a lecture and made careful research, and then presented the lecture just once -- never delivered it again. I put too much work on it. But this had no work on it -- thrown together perfectly at random, spoken offhand without any special preparation, and it succeeds when the thing we study, work over, adjust to a plan, is an entire failure." He then went on to explain to each audience that "acres of diamonds are to be found in this city, and you are to find them. Many have found them. And what man has done, man can do. [They are] are not in far-away mountains or in distant seas; they are in your own back yard if you will but dig for them." These comments provide an excellent introduction to Conwell's book. As I read it, I thought about Dorothy in L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz. Only after a series of adventures far from Kansas did she realize that "there's no place like home." What Conwell has in mind involves far more than such appreciation, however. The tale he shares in this book, concerning a wealthy Persian named Ali Hafed, demonstrates that almost everything we may seek elsewhere is already in our lives and available to us.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Whoever said that great things come in small packages, must have had this book in mind. Conwell tells the story of a man who looked for diamonds and travelled the whole world to find them. After years of searching he came back home empty handed. His wife remarried and he was destitute. By accident one day he found the diamonds in his own backyard. The moral is obvious: Examine all the evidence to find truth. Most of the time its right under your nose. Although conwell uses this story to illustrate some matters of business, the message can be applied to anything. The smartest people in the world use the principles in this book whether they know it or not. The smart and succesful are usually in the minority and probably always will be. Others may not grasp the genius in this book, but the principles of success are here.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is small, eloquent, and easy to understand. It is about life, success, money, and priorities, what these things are and aren't, and will continue to challenge the way most of us choose to live our lives for years. Read this one instead of "Who Moved My Cheese."
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By A Customer on February 1, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a child my father gave me this book to read and I didn't quite understand it all. 15 years later I pulled it out and decided to read it again. I'm so glad I did. My copy is battered, so I'm buying a new one to have to give to my children in the future. This book is incredibly inspirational while remaining logical and lighthearted. An excellent book for a young adult who is on the verge of having to make lifelong decisions. Short and simple to read.
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By Larry Hehn on October 5, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Acres of Diamonds is a lecture that Russell Conwell, founder of Temple University, delivered more than 6,000 times across the country. Through this lecture, Conwell debunks the idea that it is noble to be poor, an idea that far too many Christians share. He illustrates that it is our duty as Christians to use our gifts to honestly earn riches, because you can do more good with riches than without.
Conwell successfully illustrates the difference between the popular expression "money is the root of all evil" and the complete Biblical passage which states "the love of money is the root of all evil". The love of money is idolatry, but money itself is neither good nor evil. It is simply a tool which may be used for either good or evil.
In these pages we learn the virtues of earning money through honest, hard work. We learn to look for opportunities to serve others in our own back yard by simply finding a need and filling it. If you wish to be great, begin with who you are right now, where you are right now. Follow these principles, and you will uncover your own acres of diamonds.
Larry Hehn, Author of Get the Prize: Nine Keys for a Life of Victory
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
A simple story, yet within is one of the most inspirational messages on achievement - that everything one needs for success is probably right in their vicinity, and all one has to do is to recognise it. Someone once stated that people learn more through a story than from a lecture or cold hard information - here is proof of the validity of that statement.
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By A Customer on February 19, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Really enjoyed this little gem. Abe Lincoln's success formula and others are filled with common sense tactics to leading a rich life. Looking forward to using some of these pearls and passing this book on to those I care about.
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By A Customer on August 2, 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
I loved the book and looked forward to hearing the tape--it's the kind of book you can gain fresh insights from each time you read it.
But the audiobook, specifically Billy Nash's narration, is so hokey and overdramatic that the effect is spoiled. Stick with the book!
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