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Across 110th Street

4.2 out of 5 stars 52 customer reviews

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(Oct 16, 2001)
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Editorial Reviews

Slicker than a Harlem shakedown, Across 110th Street "hits hard" (Cue) with a jacked-up, smacked-down thrill-ride through the hell-raisin' hoods of Harlem! Cooler-than-cool Anthony Quinn leads a hot cast, including Anthony Franciosa and Yaphet Kotto, in a "hair-raising" (Motion Picture Herald) cop thriller that packs a double barrel of "gory vengeance raw, ugly and unnervingly real" (Playboy)! When a crew of gun-totin' gangstas knocks over a Mafia racket in Harlem, their plan gets blown to hell and the crib gets blown to bits! But as the bullets start flyin' and cops start dyin', a pair of New York's finest (Quinn and Kotto) are forced to work together to bring justice to the streets before the Mafia brings the ghetto to its knees! Now, wanted by the Man and hunted by the Mob, there ain't no way these homicidal homeboys are getting across 110th Street exceptin a body bag!

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Anthony Quinn, Yaphet Kotto, Anthony Franciosa, Frank Adu, Frank Arno
  • Directors: Barry Shear
  • Writers: Luther Davis, Wally Ferris
  • Producers: Anthony Quinn, Barry Shear, Fouad Said, Ralph B. Serpe, Richard Stenta
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: October 16, 2001
  • Run Time: 102 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005N7Z2
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #36,868 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Across 110th Street" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Since it's release in 1972 this film has fallen by the cinema wayside, being lumped into the blaxploitation genre - a purgatory from which it needs to be rescued. Labeling this film has limited its audience appeal in the thirty years that have followed, but those of us who were fascinated with it then remain so now.
"Across 110th Street" is sparked by the kind of gritty and incisive urban realism that blaxploitation films are missing. It's production values are an immediate tipoff that you are watching a first-rate movie. The competent, skillful direction by Barry Shear; a superb story that hardly takes a breath; great Harlem location shooting adds authenticity that makes it feel almost quasi-documentary.
It's also highlighted by a great cast of veteran A-list movie stars, B-movie regulars and a few performers getting their first chance in a meaningful role. Anthony Quinn, one of the films' executive producers, plays a brutal, insensitive police detective with a streak of racism. Anthony Franciosa plays a cruel and ruthless Italian mobster tracking down his stolen money. Richard Ward plays a raspy voiced Harlem crime kingpin that Quinn tries to pressure; Ward will be recognizable to film buffs as a prisoner in the film "Brubaker" playing the pivotal role of Abraham. Paul Benjamin, the leader of the trio of thieves, appeared in the crucial role of the con 'English' in the terrific prison drama "Escape From Alcatraz". Antonio Fargas creates another of his patented colorful, hip characters as one of the thieves. And finally, Yaphet Kotto gets his first significant film role playing the no-nonsense, by-the-book, newly assigned lieutenant who is refreshingly free of vulgarity - although he will steal a truck when he needs to!
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Format: DVD
Not a blaxploitation movie at all, this film is a smart, sharp, tough black crime drama that pulls no punches, and because of that is still remarkably fresh today after 30 years. Made in 1972, it features an early performance by Yaphet Kotto as a by the book black police lieutenant who has to work with a crude, unruly white captain--Anthony Quinn in a very strong performance.
They're after some black hoods who slaughtered five men--three whites and two blacks--in a holdup that netted 300 grand. The getaway driver is played by Starsky and Hutch's Antonio Fargas and is just one of the several excellent performances that give this film real power.
Another is turned in by Tony Franciosa playing a Mafia lieutenant who finds out about the hit and, with his henchmen, goes after the hoods. In one of many violent scenes, he finds Fargas' character and slices and dices him in a Harlem whorehouse.
The dialogue here is much more intelligent than in many dumber films and is another reason this is a real winner. When somebody talks--cop, hood, Mafioso, junkie, girlfriend--it's natural, real, uncontrived, and completely credible. You understand who these characters are and you get involved because they're not shooting bull--they're telling it like it is.
The mix of this down to the bone talk and '70s dress and behavior makes this a tremendously entertaining film. The inclusion of violence is not gratuitous at all; it's an integral part of what happens--and what has to happen, given the circumstances.
Highly recommended for fans of crime drama.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The first time I saw this movie, it was the television version. That means it was drastically cut. Purchasing it was the only way I could see the movie in its entirety. I must say, I was delighted with it even more the second time around.
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Format: DVD
I'm a big fan of so-called blaxploitation flicks. The combinaton of high camp, low budget, charismatic actors in over the top farcical roles, the slice of 1970s stereotype, all add up to terrific entertainment. what I was really surprised at watching Across 110th Street is that cheap (and plentiful) gore notwithstanding this film is a work of art. Sure blaxploitation stallwarts like Antonio Fargas and Yaphet Koto are here. Sure there are cartoonishly racist white cops, racist Italian mobsters, parasitically pimpin' black criminals, longsuffering and abused black women, just like most of these flicks. But there is also a real sense of drama here. The timing and camera work, the characterization and detail, are all a step above the standard. The acting is generally witty and convincing. Makes me wish I knew more about this film and where it fit in the development of the genre.
It gets only 4 stars because the DVD lacks special features. A commentary track would have been great.
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Format: DVD
This violent little gem ranks right up there with "The French Connection" in the pantheon of early 70s urban crime thrillers. Smartly edited, paced like an out of control freight train, and with fabulous location work that bellows authenticity, "Across 110th Street" deserves a far bigger cult. Stir in Anthony Quinn's inimitable basset hound charm, Yaphet Kotto's steely cool, Anthony Franciosa's reptilian sneer and the raspy voiced dude from Brubaker and you have a combustble confection that belongs in the collection of every discerning action movie fan. Oh, I almost forgot to mention Antonio Fargas' so-cool-it-hurts supernova wardrobe and the bleak poetry of the final shootout, including a freeze frame ending that will stay with you for days. Aces all around.
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