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Addie Joss: King of the Pitchers Paperback – January 1, 1998

4.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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About the Author

Baseball historian Scott Longert teaches courses on the origins of baseball. He is a graduate of Ohio State University, and lives in Cleveland with his wife Vicki and two golden retrievers, Spencer and Hunter.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 141 pages
  • Publisher: Society for American Baseball Research; 1 edition (January 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0910137749
  • ISBN-13: 978-0910137744
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,738,846 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Following the premature death of Cleveland pitching sensation Addie Joss, Hugh Keough of the Chicago Tribune wrote "He pitched good ball..."
On October 2nd, 1908, precious few games remained on the schedule. The American League pennant was on the line. Confident Chicago spitballer Ed Walsh dueled Cleveland sidearmer Addie Joss in a baseball tilt for the ages. Befuddled by Walsh's sopping wet deliveries, Cleveland scored but one unearned run. The lanky Joss, pitching in front of the delirious hometown faithful at League Park, allowed nary a loud foul ball. Result: a 1-0 Cleveland victory and a perfect game for Joss. All the more remarkable is Longert's poignant description of Walsh and Joss sitting on a wooden bench, chatting before the game. (Cleveland and Chicago narrowly lost out in the race to Ty Cobb's Detroit Tigers).
Baseball historian and Cleveland native Scott Longert faithful recreates this masterpiece and other remarkable pitching feats in the brief life of Adrian Joss. The versatile pitcher was also was one of the very few baseball players to have regularly penned a sports column. Felled by tuburcular meningitis at the age of 31, Joss eventually made the National Baseball Hall of Fame. So loved was Joss that a special benefit "All Star" game was staged to support Joss' widow and family.
However, Hugh Keough's assessment doesn't stand the test of time. Joss pitched "great" ball.
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Format: Paperback
A very solid and nice effort by Scott Longert. Having myself researched Addie Joss in past, I find Longert's effort even that much more impressive. There honestly is really not much information available on Addie Joss. For the collection of research materials alone, this becomes a solid effort.
Now to the gristle of the book's content...I found that seasons moved along very fast, too fast. I never really got a good feel for Addie Joss the person, but certainly Addie Joss the player was defined reasonably well. Addie's teammates were mentioned but not really made to be a part of the overall storyline (cast of characters, almost faceless). Before I knew it, the book had ended. Addie's death was truly as fast as anything else in the book, blunt and final.
I'm not sure if the speed of the book had more to do with what little information actually existed, or whether it was Scott Longert the SABR-Metrician who, although statistically as sound as they come, just could not piece it all together with a sustained storyline. In the end, something honestly was amiss, and I can't quite place it.
To see a book on Addie Joss rates a four star alone. Scott Longert should be commended on a spirited effort of bringing back one of the games classiest and greatest players. Joss in time!
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Format: Paperback
I hadn't heard of Addie Joss when I first picked up this book. It's a small, thin book. It looked to be a pleasant way to spend an evening.

In fact, it was more than pleasant. I found myself riveted to the book. A well told story about a fascinating man of the early 1900s. I liked this man I had never before heard of.

I met and admired one of the great sports stars of his day, well loved and talented, easily matching the talent and skill of the greats of yesteryear I knew well.

Why, then did I not know him previously? Tragedy took him early from baseball, from his family and from the American consciousness.

The game is what we come to see. The players are people we hope to meet. And when we meet, we hope not to be disappointed. Addie Joss did not disappoint.

Scott Longert skillfully gets out of the way and lets the story tell itself.
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Format: Paperback
Addie Joss spent a relatively short baseball career with the Cleveland Indians at the turn of the 20th century. At the time of his death in 1911 of bacterial meningitis he was the first of the great baseball pitchers to pass away. Addie's career may have been at an end at the time of his death due to a torn ligament in his pitching arm. Although his Cleveland team never appeared in a World Series Joss was a dominant pitcher in the league in addition to his taking on the role of a newspaper columnist for post-season games. A rule change was necessary for him to be admitted to the Baseball Hall of Fame since he died prior to playing in his necessary tenth major league season. A 1977 rule change led to Joss's election in 1978. An impressive benefit made up of baseball stars raised over $13,000 for the widow of Addie Joss amply demonstrated how highly he was thought among his peers in the game. Not many baseball fans have even heard of Addie Joss who passed away over 100 years ago and we can thank author Scott Longert for this book on one of the game's foremost pitchers.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Found this book fascinating, as it told much of the times that Addie Joss lived in, and interesting details about a great pitcher. An easy read which I had a hard time putting down.
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