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Adulting: How to Become a Grown-up in 468 Easy(ish) Steps Paperback – May 7, 2013

4.3 out of 5 stars 356 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (May 7, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1455516902
  • ISBN-13: 978-1455516902
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (356 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ok, so I want to address some of the negative reviews I've seen of this book. Things like, "Do you really need someone to tell you what cleaning supplies to buy?" And the answer is no, but there are so many other helpful things. I would have never thought to have a spare toothbrush on hand for when people stay at my house, but that is a great, grown up thing to do. I also love the way Kelly prioritizes things, like how to stock a kitchen. Economically, this is not an easy time to be a 20 something. She gives a list showing which kitchen supplies are most necessary to least necessary, and it makes figuring out how to stock a kitchen less overwhelming. The thing is, if you've been an adult for 10 plus years, I can see how it makes us sound stupid to not know how to do the things you do everyday. But with culture changing, more and more young people are moving into the adult world as singles. We don't have the support, financially or emotionally, of a significant other (or parents for many of us), nor do we have the option of being home and figuring out 'home-stuff' while our significant other works. We have a lot to learn in a lot of different areas of life, and we have to figure it all out quickly and at the same time. We are more than capable of doing this, but having resources like 'Adulting' speeds up the process exponentially, and helps us to organize all of the things we need to learn. A theme of this book is kindness and graciousness toward others, and I would encourage those who have been adults for a long time to interact with those of us just becoming adults with kindness and grace.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book as a Christmas gift for my 20 year old daughter, but before giving it to her, I wanted to take a look through it and see just what the advice was like. I ended up reading the entire thing. First of all, Kelly Williams Brown strikes all the right humorous notes. I laughed out loud several times and nodded in commiseration several more as her experiences mirrored my own.

But was the advice worth it? I think so. Sure, you might be too far along the pike to benefit from some of it. Some of it is complete common sense (i.e. buy toilet paper in bulk -- the use/age graph on this is priceless!). But it never hurts to read it or hear it aloud at least one time. And some of the things she covered are issues I still have trouble with and I'm easily old enough to be the author's mom.

I will indeed give this book to my daughter and hope she actually finds time to read it and absorb some of the great stuff although I hope she doesn't drink as much or have as much unmarried sex as the book allows. But if she does decide to start drinking and screwing around, the book offers some pretty good guidelines on how to do such in an adult fashion. Still I hope she spends more time on the chapter about financial responsibility. Great job, Kelly. Now if you can hurry up and turn 60, I need a book on Senioring.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoy the Adulting blog when I get a chance to read it, so I thought the book would be a fun, easy read. It was. I think it's written in a way most kids (and yes, I call twenty-somethings "kids," which is the first sign that I'm way older) will find accessible, yet it doesn't cross over into that "hey, you're trying too hard to sound like me" vibe.

There's solid advice here, without being preachy. I found a few new things for this old dog, too, such as Step 8: Remember your circle of concern versus your circle of action. It's sort of like an updated version of the Serenity Prayer.

Not every piece of advice is one that I would follow, though. It may be tempting to call a co-worker the c-word, but I wouldn't recommend it. I think you can handle conflict without calling people names.

Some favorite moments:

•We all sense our own dysfunction so clearly. And because we can't do that one thing - whether it be keeping a clean house, not feeling shy and awkward at work, or having a credit score of 750 - we assign it a higher priority on our own personal Things That You Must Be Good At If You Wish to Be a Functional Adult list. We don't remember the fourteen things we do reasonably well; we remember our one arena of miserable failure.
•Intentions are nice, but ultimately intentions don't really matter because they only exist inside you.
•A big part of being a well-adjusted person is accepting that you can't be good at everything. Some things will always be hard. Decide what you can do in those arenas.
•You're a grown-up, and you get to decide what behaviors affect you for five minutes versus what behaviors change you as a person.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It seems most of the negative reviews on here are coming from older people who got this book to give as gifts. I think people older, especially past the 35 year mark are forgetting what constitutes common sense and what kind of this you pick up along the way of life. I could see how the 35 plus crowd doesn't get it, they probably grew up with Moms at home and maybe learned stuff there. Most people my age and younger grew up with two working parents who didn't spend all their time at home showing us how to do chores, we then went off to college where depending upon the school and room and board situation potentially had all of our meals and cleaning done for us so we could focus on studying. Point being, no , I did not know what the best cleaning products would be when I moved into my first home, in fact it wasn't until my bathroom displayed evidence of needing it did it occur to me that I had to clean it, I had never cleaned a bathroom in my life. I really wish this book had been around when I first graduated college but still found good advice. I thought the advice so good I gifted one to my lttle sister graduating this year, she too has never cleaned a bathroom in her life. And yeah, you could say that we could just ask our parents all of the life lessons in this book but that's part of being an adult too, not running to Mommy and Daddy for every little thing. Well worth the investment for the practical advice alone but the humor and charm makes it an enjoyable read as well.
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