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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Penguin Classics) 0th Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 765 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0140390834
ISBN-10: 0140390839
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Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

"Tom!"

No answer.

"Tom!"

No answer.

"What's gone with that boy, I wonder? You TOM!"

No answer.

The old lady pulled her spectacles down and looked over them, about the room; then she put them up and looked out under them. She seldom or never looked through them for so small a thing as a boy; they were her state pair, the pride of her heart, and were built for "style," not service;-she could have seen through a pair of stove lids just as well. She looked perplexed for a moment, and then said, not fiercely, but still loud enough for the furniture to hear:

"Well, I lay if I get hold of you I'll-"

She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom-and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with. She resurrected nothing but the cat.

"I never did see the beat of that boy!"

She went to the open door and stood in it and looked out among the tomato vines and "jimpson" weeds that constituted the garden. No Tom. So she lifted up her voice, at an angle calculated for distance, and shouted:

"Y-o-u-u Tom!"

There was a slight noise behind her and she turned just in time to seize a small boy by the slack of his roundabout and arrest his flight.

"There! I might 'a' thought of that closet. What you been doing in there?"

"Nothing."

"Nothing! Look at your hands. And look at your mouth. What is that truck?"

"I don't know, aunt."

"Well I know. It's jam-that's what it is. Forty times I've said if you didn't let that jam alone I'd skin you. Hand me that switch."

The switch hovered in the air-the peril was desperate-

"My! Look behind you, aunt!"

The old lady whirled around, and snatched her skirts out of danger. The lad fled, on the instant, scrambled up the high board fence, and disappeared over it.

His aunt Polly stood surprised a moment, and then broke into a gentle laugh.

"Hang the boy, can't I never learn anything? Ain't he played me tricks enough like that for me to be looking out for him

by this time? But old fools is

the biggest fools there is. Can't learn an old dog new tricks, as the saying is. But my goodness, he never plays them alike, two days, and how is a body to know what's coming? He 'pears to know just how long he can torment me before I get my dander up, and he knows if he can make out to put me off for a minute or make me laugh, it's all down again and I can't hit him a lick. I ain't doing my duty by that boy, and that's the Lord's truth, goodness knows. Spare the rod and spile the child, as the Good Book says. I'm a-laying up sin and suffering for us both, I know. He's full of the Old Scratch, but laws-a-me! he's my own dead sister's boy, poor thing, and I ain't got the heart to lash him, somehow. Every time I let him off my conscience does hurt me so, and every time I hit him my old heart most breaks. Well-a-well, man that is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble, as the Scripture says, and I reckon it's so. He'll play hookey this evening,* and I'll just be obleeged to make him work, to-morrow, to punish him. It's mighty hard to make him work Saturdays, when all the boys is having holiday, but he hates work more than he hates anything else, and I've got to do some of my duty by him, or I'll be the ruination of the child."

Tom did play hookey, and he had a very good time. He got back home barely in season to help Jim, the small colored boy, saw next day's wood and split the kindlings, before supper-at least he was there in time to tell his adventures to Jim while Jim did three-fourths of the work. Tom's younger brother, (or rather, half-brother) Sid, was already through with his part of the work (picking up chips,) for he was a quiet boy and had no adventurous, troublesome ways.

While Tom was eating his supper, and stealing sugar as opportunity offered, aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile, and very deep-for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments. Like many other simple-hearted souls, it was her pet vanity to believe she was endowed with a talent for dark and mysterious diplomacy and she loved to contemplate her most transparent devices as marvels of low cunning. Said she:

"Tom, it was middling warm in school, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Powerful warm, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Didn't you want to go in a-swimming, Tom?"

A bit of a scare shot through Tom-a touch of uncomfortable suspicion. He searched aunt Polly's face, but it told him nothing. So he said:

"No'm-well, not very much."

The old lady reached out her hand and felt Tom's shirt, and said:

"But you ain't too warm now, though." And it flattered her to reflect that she had discovered that the shirt was dry without anybody knowing that that was what she had in her mind. But in spite of her, Tom knew where the wind lay, now. So he forestalled what might be the next move:

"Some of us pumped on our heads-mine's damp yet. See?"

Aunt Polly was vexed to think she had overlooked that bit of circumstantial evidence, and missed a trick. Then she had a new inspiration:

"Tom, you didn't have to undo your shirt collar where I sewed it to pump on your head, did you? Unbutton your jacket!"

The trouble vanished out of Tom's face. He opened his jacket. His shirt collar was securely sewed.

"Bother! Well, go 'long with you. I'd made sure you'd played hookey and been a-swimming. But I forgive ye, Tom. I reckon you're a kind of a singed cat, as the saying is-better'n you look. This time."

She was half sorry her sagacity had miscarried, and half glad that Tom had stumbled into obedient conduct for once.

But Sidney said:

"Well, now, if I didn't think you sewed his collar with white thread, but it's black."

"Why, I did sew it with white! Tom!"

But Tom did not wait for the rest. As he went out at the door he said:

"Siddy, I'll lick you for that."

In a safe place Tom examined two large needles which were thrust into the lappels of his jacket, and had thread bound about them-one needle carried white thread and the other black. He said:

"She'd never noticed, if it hadn't been for Sid. Consound it! sometimes she sews it with white and sometimes she sews it with black. I wish to geeminy she'd stick to one or t'other-I can't keep the run of 'em. But I bet you I'll lam Sid for that. I'll learn him!"

He was not the Model Boy of the village. He knew the model boy very well though-and loathed him.

Within two minutes, or even less, he had forgotten all his troubles. Not because his troubles were one whit less heavy and bitter to him than a man's are to a man, but because a new and powerful interest bore them down and drove them out of his mind for the time-just as men's misfortunes are forgotten in the excitement of new enterprises. This new interest was a valued novelty in whistling, which he had just acquired from a negro, and he was suffering to practice it undisturbed. It consisted in a peculiar bird-like turn, a sort of liquid warble, produced by touching the tongue to the roof of the mouth at short intervals in the midst of the music-the reader probably remembers how to do it if he has ever been a boy. Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it, and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude. He felt much as an astronomer feels who has discovered a new planet. No doubt, as far as strong, deep, unalloyed pleasure is concerned, the advantage was with the boy, not the astronomer.

The summer evenings were long. It was not dark, yet. Presently Tom checked his whistle. A stranger was before him-a boy a shade larger than himself. A new-comer of any age or either sex was an impressive curiosity in the poor little shabby village of St. Petersburg. This boy was well dressed, too-well dressed on a week-day. This was simply astounding. His cap was a dainty thing, his close-buttoned blue cloth roundabout was new and natty, and so were his pantaloons. He had shoes on-and yet it was only Friday. He even wore a necktie, a bright bit of ribbon. He had a citified air about him that ate into Tom's vitals. The more Tom stared at the splendid marvel, the higher he turned up his nose at his finery and the shabbier and shabbier his own outfit seemed to him to grow. Neither boy spoke. If one moved, the other moved-but only sidewise, in a circle; they kept face to face and eye to eye all the time. Finally Tom said:

"I can lick you!"

"I'd like to see you try it."

"Well, I can do it."

"No you can't, either."

"Yes I can."

"No you can't."

"I can."

"You can't."

"Can!"

"Can't!"

An uncomfortable pause. Then Tom said:

"What's your name?"

"Tisn't any of your business, maybe."

"Well I 'low I'll make it my business."

"Well why don't you?"

"If you say much I will."

"Much-much-much! There now."

"Oh, you think you're mighty smart, don't you? I could lick you with one hand tied behind me, if I wanted to."

"Well why don't you do it? You say you can do it."

"Well I will, if you fool with me."

"Oh yes-I've seen whole families in the same fix."

"Smarty! You think you're some, now, don't you? Oh what a hat!"

"You can lump that hat if you don't like it. I dare you to knock it off-and anybody that'll take a dare will suck eggs."

"You're a liar!"

"You're another."--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Gr 4–8—Tom, Becky, Aunt Polly, and the other residents of St. Petersburg, MO, come to vivid life through Payne's exuberant artwork in this handsome reprint edition of the classic story. Finely detailed pencil drawings, stunning watercolors, and mixed-media compositions depict playful, Norman Rockwell-esque portraits, Americana, and thoughtful visualizations of Twain's iconic scenes. A work of art, this oversize edition is a lovely addition for collectors and libraries with large classics collections.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Lexile Measure: 950L (What's this?)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (October 7, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140390839
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140390834
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (765 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #329,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A. Frank on February 15, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This review applies specifically to the April 2010, Sterling Edition, illustrated by Robert Ingpen:
I'm beginning to feel quite frustrated with the limited publishing information given to books on Amazon. For example, most books where you may click to "look inside" will default to the most common paperback. For books like Tom Sawyer, that is fine if you need the book for high school English class, where any copy cheap enough to write notes in the margins will do. I wanted a copy of Tom Sawyer to keep and love. I saw this publication on Amazon, but it had so little info and the one review given was a single sentence about the general value of Twain's story. The truth is, one doesn't buy this particular printing unless one is already convinced of it's literary excellency! So I am about to do Amazon a huge favor by telling you what it didn't tell me. For about $15, the asking price at the time of this review, you can invest in a real treat for your self or someone you love and wish to inspire.
This printing was meant to mark the one hundredth anniversary of Twain's death (2010). The story is unabridged, provided in full original text. It is positively rich with watercolor illustrations by Robert Ingpen. I just skimmed through the book looking for one that I especially liked, but I couldn't pick just one. In design, they are exactly as I would have dreamed them to be. Barefoot Tom, balancing a piece of straw on his nose, Huck Finn with a dead cat, Tom and puppy in church, Injun Joe- terrifying....each one pulls me in to read the text. The fabulous, wrapping cover art is also printed at the end of the book, so won't be lost if the dust jacket is damaged.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn certainly rank among the very finest fiction in the American literary canon. Only fools would suggest otherwise. Unfortunately, other fools have censored both books. This is an obscenity. Do these morons actually think that they need to protect the reading public from ideas that were the cultural norm 175 years ago? What unmitigated, insufferable, ignominious gall. Thankfully, Amazon can still provide us with the original versions of these brilliant books. The suggestion that reading Twain in his original prose somehow endangers the public good is both specious and ridiculous. So, then, if we read Lolita will we become pedophiles? If we read Pound will we become fascists? If we read Portnoy's Complaint will we masturbate constantly? The exquisite sensitivity of some groups within our society says more about their determined unwillingness to embrace the freedom and democracy they enjoy than anything else. To hell with them. Buy these wonderful books and read them guilt-free.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Unabridged and IllustratedThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer that I bought from amazon.com is a paperback Piccadilly Classics (Unabridged and Illustrated) edition, written by Mark Twain (Samuel Langborne Clemens) and illustrated by T. Williams, and published by Piccadilly Books, Ltd. copyright 2010.

I am VERY pleased with this edition's keeping to the Mark Twain's original manuscript and the use of (from my understanding...and by the looks of it) wonderfully-used original illustrations. I mean, really, the size of the book, typeface and insertion of the illustrations are artfully done and flow very nicely.

The thing that makes me sick about this book, is that it is less than 1-month old and falling apart DURING my first reading of it. Such a fun, beautiful and timeless book deserves to be printed accordingly. A classic deserves a matching binding and cover quality that will withstand numerous generations of readers effortlessly.

Specific problems I have had with my copy include: (1) The pages are bound together unevenly. I had a mind just to send the book back to amazon when I saw this flaw, because I knew they would right the problem immediately. My kids saw some of the illustrations and cover, however, and were so ready for me to read it NOW, that I kept it and decided it would just be an imperfect addition to our library. But more imperfections promptly presented themselves. (2) Because of the uneven binding job, the cover tore at the bottom where there are no pages to hold it up (the unevenly bound pages "slant" to full starting at the front cover back).
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Format: Kindle Edition
"The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" is a true classic. I loved the abridged version as a child and decided to read it in the original form as an adult.

It is a lively, charming and light-hearted story about a rebellious young boy (his age is never stated), who thrives on playing hilarious pranks and is constantly getting in trouble for disorderly conduct of the most original kind. Under it all though he has a good and generous heart.

Huckleberry Finn is introduced as a dirt-poor, uneducated and disreputable boy whose mother has died and whose drunkard father has abandoned him. An instantly endearing character to the reader, he is nevertheless shunned by the adults of "civilized" society, who warn their children to stay away from him because "he was idle and lawless and vulgar and bad". Tom, like the rest of the respectable boys is under strict orders not to play with him.

Not surprisingly, Tom "played with him every time he got a chance."

Thus begins a deep and enduring friendship that remains the central theme for the rest of the book.

The book is part memoir and part social critique against prevailing attitudes and hypocrisies, but mostly it is a witty and charming story jumping blithely from one adventure to the next, and told in deceptively simple but deftly crafted language. Therefore it is thoroughly enjoyable, even when the subject matter is inconsequential. I loved his description of a rather one-sided contest between a poodle and a "pinch bug" in the middle of a chruch service - it is a minor event in the book, but absolutely hilarious and a joy to read and re-read. It is quintessential Mark Twain writing at the pinnacle of his wit and style.
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