Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$7.39
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book. Has usual library labels and stamps.Good readable copy with minor wear to cover. Pages clean and unmarked. Eligible for Free 2-day Prime or free Super saver shipping. All orders ship fast from the Amazon warehouse with tracking number. Amazon's hassle free return policy means your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

After the Falls: Coming of Age in the Sixties Hardcover – October 28, 2010

4.8 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.84 $0.01

Popular & highly-rated in Biographies & Memoirs
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

At age 12, Gildiner and her family moved from their Niagara Falls home to a Buffalo suburb, leaving behind a family business, smalltown contentment, and the rebellious childhood chronicled in her first memoir, Too Close to the Falls. While her uprooted parents struggle to adjust, Gildiner stumbles in making new friends and edging into puberty. Her restlessness and a fundamentally outspoken and argumentative nature regularly catapult her further than simple teenage trouble, and she frequently fails at the standard American girlhood, often with comic results. The conflicts between the narrator's individuality and conformity propel her into her first relationship at the same time that the seismic shifts in American society, culture, and politics hit home with ever-increasing force. On the page as in life, comedy, tragedy, and elegy live right on top of each other, and as with most remarkable memoirs, the straightforward, honest voice and perspective are steady even in the most painful moments. (Nov.) (c)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In this follow-up to Gildiner’s first memoir, Too Close to the Falls (2001), which became a surprise best-seller, she details the family’s move from small-town Lewiston, New York, to a Buffalo suburb. Used to working side-by-side with her father in the family pharmacy from the age of four, she now must refocus her considerable energy into fitting in with her peers. But once she conquers the clique of popular girls, which takes her little more than two months, she moves on to land a job in a gritty, working-class doughnut shop, which she almost burns to the ground. The second half of her memoir deals with her experiences at Ohio State University, where she enters into a romance with a black football player and becomes involved in civil rights work, which leads to a frightening encounter with the FBI. Her relationship with her father, once so close, becomes frayed until she realizes he is suffering from a severe health issue that requires her help. Throughout, the author’s offbeat attitude, born of her unusual upbringing and wide-ranging experiences, proves to be charming, amusing, and even inspirational. --Joanne Wilkinson
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Viking (October 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670022055
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670022052
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,654,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book and "Too Close To The Falls" primarily because I too was born and raised in Western New York, but was pleasantly surprised that the story itself was beautiful and very well written. Recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Gildiner's evocative prose about turbulent times contains the perfect combination of history, humor, and heartache. You don't need to have lived through the 60s or even in Western New York to appreciate the generational, political, and social conflicts that occur when the times are a-changin'. Gildiner has a poetic voice and an analytical mind so it's a pleasure to read her sentences and be privy to her observations about life, relationships, and human nature.
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
"After the Falls" continues the story of Cathy (McClure) Gildiner's exploits as a young rebel in the making. The title, by the way, is a clever reference to both her previous book ("Too Close to the Falls") and to Arthur Miller's "After the Fall". Miller's book was about his life with Marilyn Monroe, who figured anecdotally in Gildiner's first book-- Cathy delivered drugs to Marilyn's hotel room while she was in the area of Lewiston, Maine, making the movie "Niagara".

"Too Close to the Falls" documented Cathy's nearly idyllic early childhood in the Fifties, in Lewiston. "After the Falls" is altogether darker, replacing the nostalgic charm of the Fifties with the disillusion, tumult, and fracture of the Sixties. Early in this memoir, as a junior high student, Cathy witnesses a privileged bunch of popular boys as they victimize a hapless young girl. That incident seems to set the tone. Having moved from a spacious home in Lewiston to a bungalow in "Tinytown", a section of Buffalo, Cathy tries to make the best of her new life. She adapts well, using her wits, but eventually she gives up on her battle to be one of "the cool people". Her father, who alienated her by coming down hard on her newly found interest in boys, eventually loses his mind to a brain tumor. Cathy goes to college in southern Ohio, and excels... but, through her idealism, runs afoul of the FBI because of her Civil Rights activities and her trip to the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968.

The story is still engaging, but there are times when Gildiner seems a little to 'artful' in her writing.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the second memoir for Catherine Gildner. The first book takes place in Lewiston, NY in the 50's between the ages of 4-12. This book starts at age 12 where the first book left off as her family moves from Lewiston to Amherst, NY. Being from Buffalo myself, I enjoyed both of these books very much. The first book is more like a series of vignettes, and I found the chronology of her story to get a little confusing, as the time frames for the different chapters overlapped each other. This book is written in chronological order, and I found it easier to keep track of where she was in her life. Her childhood was a very interesting one, as her parents gave her an enormous amount of freedom and responsibity from a very early age. I like her writing style, which is conversational, and very funny at times. I would recommend this book for sure, but don't think it would be nearly as enjoyable if you haven't read her first book first.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Catherine Gildner's two books were a joy to read. After reading "Too Close to the Falls"
I was disappointed not to find "After the Falls" available at my libraries or local book stores.
So happy to be able to order from Amazon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After reading "Too Close to the Falls", which made me laugh to the point of tears, I was delighted to learn Catherine Gildiner wrote a sequel. "After the Falls" does not disappoint. As for the incredulity of a previous reviewer, the events of the '60s, whether viewing the Beatles on the. Ed Sullivan show, the student war protest movement, or the disastrous Democratic. National convention of 1968, were witnessed and shared by most of us who lived through them. I found Ms. Gildiner's candor and self-analysis to be touching and insightful. The epilogue is poignant and her self-forgiveness is admirable. The book still contains many hilarious anecdotes but the book takes on a more appropriately serious and adult tone. A very entertaining memoir reflecting the upheaval and changes seen throughout the '60s by a talented writer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I can't even put into words how I felt about this book! I loved it and the writer! I've been meaning to write a review for awhile! I went to school with Cathy but didn't know her well at the time. I was in the "wild" sorority she mentions and too involved with boyfriends (as she tells me). She is one of the most talented, bright, compassionate,humorous, honest people I know, and an absolute delight to be around! Our lives came together again at our high school reunions in our "later" years and we've since remained close friends. Anywho, back to the book -- it made me laugh and cry (which are MY two signs of a wonderful book) and it allowed me to get to know the Cathy from the 60s and the reality of that era. I, myself, actually "skated" around that era without getting involved in the huge changes that were happening then in our culture. I was busy working (not fortunate enough to attend college). So this was yet another eye-opener to what I "missed" and insight into Cathy, a very unique individual, way ahead of her time (as her mom was). Proud to have her as a friend. This is a MUST read and I hope someday a movie!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?