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Agenda 21 (Agenda 21 Series) by [Beck, Glenn, Parke, Harriet]
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Agenda 21 (Agenda 21 Series) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 2,359 customer reviews
Book 1 of 2 in Agenda 21 Series (2 Book Series)
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Product Details

  • File Size: 2241 KB
  • Print Length: 401 pages
  • Publisher: Threshold Editions (November 20, 2012)
  • Publication Date: November 20, 2012
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00902UC0W
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #99,105 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really am a fan of Glenn Beck, and I've read most of his books and listen to him every day. I guess I might have had really high expectations to this book that have fallen somewhat short. To my mind, this is really little more than a good "short story". It's a quick read, with very short chapters. It's also a very simple storyline. It's not a bad book at all, and I take it for what it is, a theoretically possible future outcome of some of the policies we see our government enacting day by day.
SPOILERS BELOW...
This book follows the personal journey of Emmeline, who spends her whole life in a communal society, performing mindless tasks for the regime she lives under. Set in a dystopian future, it is pretty much told from the first-person perspective, which I found intriguing. Maybe that's what threw me off on it, as I was expecting a lot more exposition of the story than given. There is very little character development, and this is to be expected from a 1st person perspective. Everything in the story is from the eyes of Emmeline, who doesn't have much in the way of providing a grand 3rd person perspective on the whole outline of what's happening to her and her baby. They (the government) take her baby from her (for the greater good of society), and she goes through the process of maturation to a point where this matters to her. In retrospect, this is the most compelling part of the story. She enlists the aid of others, who are (mostly) all aloof to the happenings around them as she is.
END SPOILERS
I said that I felt like this was a short story somehow stretched out to be a novel. I think this is a fair critique of the book. I was immediately reminded of Urusla LeGuin's short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" when I finished the book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a novel about life in a futuristic compound that constitutes part of a republic to which everyone is expected to express support on a regular basis. Conditions are dreary, to say the least, and grow worse as the story progresses.

Spartan living quarters - energy cubes twice a day, and an occasional hard boiled egg - paired with a mate selected by the authorities - children taken at birth and reared in a collective, state-controlled area - produce a daily quota of energy on a treadmill or perform other boring tasks - anyone who breaks rules (which are vague and keep changing) or fails to meet quota is in deep trouble - no rewards for exceeding expectations, so don't try - to get ahead, know someone with influence, e.g., an Authority Figure (only shadowy figures in this book), or snitch on fellow citizens - people who have special needs or develop medical problems are "taken away."

At the frequent Social Update meetings (attendance mandatory), the "news" is about far away places and events that no one knows much about (e.g., wars are said to be going on with other states), but "announcements" pertain to new rules and expectations and have immediate application. Everyone is expected to indicate acceptance and express allegiance to the Republic, nothing more.

Emmeline (the teenage heroine) is a quick study, and she begins to understand (and hate) what is going on and develop a plan. Do the things that are monitored to avoid attracting attention - gain and assess information (from treasures her mother hid in a sleeping mat, other citizens she can trust, and her own observations) - make contact with her infant daughter in the children's village. Although flight or resistance seems quixotic at best, she will be pushed to it in time.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can take or leave Glen Beck, he borders on the conspiracy theory's a bit much sometimes, but it is a good read and a quick read. You think you are reading science fiction until you actually look up Agenda 21 and find out that it is really alive and well and then the book becomes a bit more real .A lot of things that I thought could not happen are starting to happen.. A book that should be taken with a grain of salt and hopefully will nremain just a book of fiction.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I like these future dystopia stories and this one moves along well. Apparently basing his story on a UN discussion paper (or similar) the author creates a realistic future world with believable characters. The plot is good. Unfortunately just when the story reaches an interesting point it finishes abruptly. What a shame.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
From the very cover this book declares itself a thriller but in actuality, it's merely the first introduction of the most provocative tripe cobbled between two hard covers since Pat Roberton's The End of the Age. Its questionable enough to base the plot of your book on a conspiracy theory, but when Glenn Beck got together with Harriet Parke (a dubious writer in her right) to write a book about one, I will tell you - the results are just what you would expect and it was NOT good.

Agenda 21 is perhaps Glenn Beck's first foray into explicitly fictional writing (though most likely Harriet was given most of the responsibility as plausible deniability) about a dystopian future based the Agenda 21/New World Order conspiracies revolving around the character Emmeline, a recent mother (and possibly adult orphan) who begins to doubt the Orwellian-esque world she lives in. In this world, food is allotted to her in cubes, an 'authority' exerts control of a citizen's life from where they live to who they marry, and children are taken away to be raised communally. They generate their own energy and as a hat tip to Ayn Rand are forced to live equally with almost no personal property. Written as part of a trilogy - the sequel came out this January - this first part serves primarily as an introduction of the major players and the world they live in that ends in the breakout cliffhanger for the fore mentioned sequel.

This is not thriller in any sense of the word.
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