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Agile Project Management : Agile Decisions - Driving Effective Agile Decisions in Business (Agile Business Leadership Book 3) by [Nir, Michael]
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Agile Project Management : Agile Decisions - Driving Effective Agile Decisions in Business (Agile Business Leadership Book 3) Kindle Edition

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Editorial Reviews

Review

By H. P. Portman
This weekend I received a copy of Michael Nir's ninth book D-side, practical decision making business guide. It's an easy to read book about an interesting and difficult topic. It's all about decision making. Michael uses from time to time simple icons to show you a reminder, to make a reflection or give a thumbs-up with an easy to understand example.

The first chapter explains why complexity is under-rated. Michael uses the well-known traveler salesperson problem to show the difference between none deterministically polynomial (which are complex, confusing and constitute the majority of business and personal decision problems we face) versus the second degree polygons.

The second chapter explains two approaches to tackle these complex problems. The first is a top down computerized algorithm and the second is the bottom up local approach. Computerized algorithms can be used for, e.g. allocation of resources and machines in a production environment or within a portfolio office to balance the project portfolio.

The third chapter explores the consequence once your top down plan fails using the example of building pyramids. What will be the impact of (not) having position power, having debates on priorities and the one who yells loudest will get the priority. You need to have rules to guide decisions.

The fourth chapter combines the two approaches and gives, in detail, some practical guidelines to pursuit. E.g. simple local rules and strategic to down rules and visual problem presentation.

The last chapter is about focus. What are the absolute must haves, the real needs? What are the elements of the complex decision, what is the timeline we have for deciding?

From the Author


When I was young I loved reading Mad magazine. I guess this more or less uncovers my age.
Recently, Al Feldstein, who was eulogized as the soul behind Mad magazine passed away at the age of 88. Mad magazine has impacted the way I write and the way I present information in lectures, workshops and while coaching: always take it with a grain of salt, and make sure you're not overly serious.
For me it was always about the: Lighter side of...
I am dedicating this book as a homage to Al.

Product Details

  • File Size: 2206 KB
  • Print Length: 186 pages
  • Publisher: Sapir Consutling; 1 edition (June 17, 2014)
  • Publication Date: June 17, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00L3MOBH2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #314,973 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is like the author writes: A humoristic practical approach to understanding why decisions are so difficult and what can be done about it. Specifically I liked what the author refers to as: For your enhanced reader experience, we use the following interactive tools in the book. Also the following references to Thinking fast and slow: System 2, in Kahneman’s scheme, is our slow, deliberate, analytical and consciously effortful mode of reasoning about the world. System 1, by contrast, is our fast, automatic, intuitive and largely unconscious mode. It is System 1 that detects hostility in a voice and effortlessly completes the phrase “bread and. . . . ” It is System 2 that swings into action when we have to fill out a tax form or park a car in a narrow space.
More generally, System 1 uses association and metaphor to produce a quick and dirty draft of reality, which System 2 draws on to arrive at explicit beliefs and reasoned choices. System 1 proposes, System 2 disposes. So System 2 would seem to be the boss, right? In principle, yes. But System 2, in addition to being more deliberate and rational, is also lazy. And it tires easily. Too often, instead of slowing things down and analyzing them, System 2 is content to accept the easy but unreliable story about the world that System 1 feeds to it. “Although System 2 believes itself to be where the action is,” Kahneman writes, “the automatic System 1 is the hero of this book.” System 2 is especially quiescent, it seems, when your mood is a happy one.
Makes absolute sense for me and connects to the idea of complex decision making.
Practical book
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author shares the following example which I find interesting and relevant: Take for example an Auto repair shop, there are several mechanics using a few distinct machines to fix cars. You are arriving in the morning to have your car tuned. You want to know when to pick it up. The manager checks your car and says it requires a tune up and maintenance, involving several machines.
Actually he really says that the head cover gasket is faulty hence the travel gear shifts are jittery…at this point you know the invoice will be well over 3,000.00$
The manager has to commit to a realistic completion time, and the sooner the better. However there are already 15 cars that have to go through different stations and the mechanics differ in skills.
It is what makes this decision making book so approachable and powerful. i can endorse the examples and solutions presented.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I warmly recommend this book. It's useful and entertaining as well.

The chapters are as followed:
Business decisions: Complexity is under-rated
Business decisions: The sushi was poisoned
Business decisions: Building pyramids
Business decisions: Fusion, packing nothing to Moscow
Business decisions: D siding, the road not taken
Each chapter explains thoroughly and succinctly the idea of decision making, containing tools, examples and open-minding concepts.
The book is as good for the layman as for the professional. Presented in an easy to digest format. I am eagerly awaiting the audio version, so I can listen to it on my way to work.
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Format: Paperback
This weekend I received a copy of Michael Nir’s ninth book D-side, practical decision making business guide. A small book which I read during my flight from Amsterdam to Athens. It’s an easy to read book about an interesting and difficult topic. It’s all about decision making. Michael uses from time to time simple icons to show you a reminder, to make a reflection or give a thumbs-up with an easy to understand example.

The book is divided into five chapters.

The first chapter explains why complexity is under-rated. Michael uses the well-known traveler salesperson problem to show the difference between none deterministically polynomial (which are complex, confusing and constitute the majority of business and personal decision problems we face) versus the second degree polygons (which are easy to solve). He introduces the use of local decision rules and complications when using.

The second chapter explains two approaches to tackle these complex problems. The first is a top down computerized algorithm and the second is the bottom up local approach. Computerized algorithms can be used for, e.g. allocation of resources and machines in a production environment or within a portfolio office to balance the project portfolio. Solutions will be ok-solutions (5% far from an optimal solution). The second approach introduces the Japanese way thinking, e.g., the usage of lean to enhance production quality which enables better material planning and scheduling.

The third chapter explores the consequence once your top down plan fails using the example of building pyramids. What will be the impact of (not) having position power, having debates on priorities and the one who yells loudest will get the priority. You need to have rules to guide decisions.
Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an interesting business decision making book that is relevant also for personal decisions. Have a look at what the author is writing about personal decisions – this on I like the most:

You booked a great vacation in the Caribbean. Your flight is early next morning. You are in your bedroom packing. Considering the current restrictions, you are allowed only one piece of luggage and a small carry on to take onboard. You have only tonight to decide what to pack. You want to make sure, that you’re packing just what you need. You remember how you’ve missed a proper mosquito repellant last year on your excursion to Alaska. Who would’ve known that the mosquito is their national bird? Maybe a helmet is in order – did you know that the common belief that dozens, if not hundreds of people die of coconuts falling on their heads, is no more than an urban fairytale?

The style is friendly and unassuming; just what I like in a decision making book that I can relate to. The examples are worthy and even if some fields of expertise aren’t my own, I can still see the point he’s making. This makes it an enjoyable book with practical thoughts and guidelines on decision making.
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