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Showing 1-10 of 10 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 18 reviews
on December 7, 2000
I think in light of other reviews it makes some sense to underscore that this book is not about environmentalism in the traditional sense, but about the connection between the environment and people. LaDuke's great contribution to the environmental debate is her all-too-rare understanding that there is a connection between the earth and the people that live on it. Not in some hocus-pocus new age way, but a real, scientific connection between people (particulary Native people, because of their lifestyle) and polution. My lone criticism is the charicaturization of corporations in this book. GM does pollute, but consumers are also to blame. Nevertheless, LaDuke is undoubtedly correct in connecting the dots between industrialization, militarism and environmental pollution and she does so in a way that few authors have ever done. A fantastic book that stands in stark contrast to Earth in the Balance as a real manifesto for true environmentalists.
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on April 1, 2000
La Duke is an inspiration to young environmentalists all over the world irrespective of their lineage. This book clearly resonates her strong beliefs and convictions about environmental issues through numerous case examples. However, I was hoping that there would be more in terms of research inquiry about the causes of environmental injsutice. Why is it that tribal leadership, and often a large constituency within a tribe, often repudiate much of the environmental ethic which is presented here? It is easy to dismiss this question by saying that the government or corporations are to blame, but I personally think that there is more at play than just external manipulation. I would urge La Duke to respond to some of her critics within the Native American establishment in her next work -- which I am sure will be just as compelling and positively provocative. Also it may be useful to have a chapter responding to environmental historians such as Calvin Luther Martin. I think a good work responding to these revisionists is needed from a seasoned and erudite Native voice such as La Duke.
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on January 17, 2017
Thank you so much for sending this book promptly! I love it!
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on January 19, 2016
A beautiful, thoughtfully written account of the steep uphill battle for fair treatment by native people in the US and Canada.
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on July 23, 2016
I've read many thousands of books and this is my all-time favorite. I like to keep a couple of extra copies around to give to friends. Wherever there are remnants of indigenous peoples, big corporations and governments are using violence to try to evict them and steal their resources. Lifestyles that sustained humanity for tens of thousands of years should be allowed to survive the greed and expediency of "civilization." There's nothing civilized about genocide for profit. It's barbaric and needs to be understood as such.

"Live simply so that others may simply live." --Mahatma Gandhi
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on January 7, 2013
Very detailed version of how the white man has treated the indigenous natives not only in the US, but elsewhere. LaDuke's books have a special significance to me as for the past 4 years I went through the White Earth Reservation on my way to a friend's house in northern MN. I wanted to visit White Earth, but never had the time. I have the same comments about "The Winona LaDuke Reader"

I've sent several emails to the White Earth Reservation, and have ordered some of their merchandise, but haven't received a reply.
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on November 30, 2009
I ordered this book for my college students to read before we visited the Navajo Nation. The book was informative and gave the students good background into the current struggles of the Native American people. Students found the book easy to read and to comprehend key issues and concerns.
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on January 15, 2011
I received my book in the mail not too long after i ordered. It was one of my first online book purchases... saved me a lot of money compared to what the school bookstore was asking!!! The book itself was in great condition, definately better than some used books i have purchased in the past from school. Pages weren't creased, marked, and the cover had no defects! GREAT BUY VERY HAPPY WITH PURCHASE!!!! THANKS!!!
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on November 7, 2016
Very good book. Many things I did not know. Some things I'm not sure about.
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on July 5, 2011
The idea of this book is amazing. The editing of this book is not. I found so many mistakes that it was often hard to read. One sentence had 6 commas and was five lines long. Poor writing and poor editing, I'm sure there is a better book out there.
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