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Comment: Nice Previously Handled Copy with Moderate Wear to Covers and Interior. Will Include Notes, Highlights, and Marks to Interior and Exterior May Have Creases and Signs of Overall Wear. Sides of the book show wear but interior is in good condition.
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The American Cinema: Directors And Directions 1929-1968 Paperback – August 22, 1996

4.8 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Since its publication in 1968, The American Cinema has been the manifesto of the auteur theory. Written by Andrew Sarris, the theory's chief advocate, the book traces the history of movies by examining the careers of more than 200 film directors. Covering everyone from D.W. Griffith to Francis Coppola, Orson Welles to Roman Polanski, Sarris argues that directorial greatness is marked by a personal style and consistency of excellence that can be traced throughout a career. Sarris's commentary is sometimes worshipful, sometimes acrid, but almost always quotable. Alfred Hitchcock is "the supreme technician of the American cinema." John Huston coasted "on his reputation as a wronged individualist with an alibi for every bad movie." Stanley Kubrick holds "a naive faith in the power of images to transcend fuzzy feelings and vague ideas." Michelangelo Antonioni makes films so pessimistic and alienating that Sarris dubs him "Antoniennui."

You may not agree with all of Sarris's assessments, but this book provides the best possible opportunity to consider auteurism, an approach to cinema that, in an age that reveres Scorsese, Spielberg, and Tarantino, seems more relevant than ever. The book closes with an essay called "The Auteur Theory Revised," Sarris's attempt at a definitive theoretical statement. --Raphael Shargel

From Library Journal

This 1968 volume is probably the bible of the auteur theory of filmmaking, i.e., that the director's vision is what shapes film history. Though LJ's reviewer found some of Sarris's conclusions "furiously debatable," this nonetheless is an "invaluable reference book and a major contribution to film literature" (LJ 12/15/68).
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1st Da Capo Press ed edition (August 22, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0306807289
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306807282
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #298,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This volume parses the good guys from the bad guys, tells you whom you should love and why, and summarily dismisses the ones not worth taking seriously. In other words, for good or bad, it arms you, as will no other film book ever written, with a set of eloquently-stated prejudices that may seal off certain directors from your serious consideration for all time. (It would be too glib to say that this is the books best and worst point.) Suffice to say, it has taken years for me to tear down the wall Sarris built between me, as a budding cinephile, and William Wyler, Billy Wilder, John Huston and even John Frankenheimer, for that matter. (These are just a few of the ones I think he was, or may have been, wrong about.)
But I love this book and always find it worth picking up to reread a few entries, for two or three reasons that never grow old:
1) Sarris IS an absolutely remarkable writer. His prose bristles with alternately apt and acid phrases and insights. The parallel between Ambrose Bierce and Sarris has grown on me through the years. (I think it was Sarris who brought currency to the word "pretentious"-- possibly THE serious put-down word from the 70s to the 90s, possibly to the present-- by the way. He used it with unerring surgical delicacy, as a bludgeon.)
2) He is hard to argue with in his negative evaluation of certain other respected directors. Thirty-five years ago, Sarris renounced Kubrick, noting, in typical form, that the very fact that he made one film every 5 years seemed to be all the proof his advocates needed of his integrity. Ouch! And he said that Kubrick is the director of the best coming attractions in the business.
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Format: Paperback
Since 1973, when I bought the book for a college course, the book is a permanent part of my library. I should have replaced the original by now, but I owe to it my appetite and appreciation for movies. Even when I don't agree with Mr. Sarris (as with his estimation of John Huston) I know why; his erudition is so clear I am forced to explain myself. Reading him has taught me how to watch, explore, compare and contrast films and directors at least. I credit him with having deepend my entire experience of movie going.
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Format: Paperback
No book I've ever owned has influenced my life more than this one. It has remained in continuous use as a single very well-worn copy since purchased in 1974. Not only the precepts, but the very words are burned into my brain. Is it good or bad that I can't get "Inconsistency is the hobgoblin of Tay Garnett's career" out of my head? I doubt it is as easy to fall under Sarris's spell with 40 years having passed since the book's publication, but perhaps I'm wrong, with TCM and Netflix providing fairly easy access to the films I sought out like a pilgrim based on Sarris's writing. I still can't imagine a better way to delve into film history than through this amazingly articulate work.
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Format: Paperback
When it first appeared in the late '60s, Sarris' book was literally memorized by critics, students and teachers. It provided a root approach to discussing film, quickly absorbed, and readily shaped to one's personal tastes. A beautiful combination of reference and aesthetic, it ushered in the era of "the director as superstar," and was completely absorbed by everyone in film. Unfortunately, its absorption was so complete, the author, Mr. Sarris, was for the most part uncredited and unrewarded.
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Format: Paperback
In brief, beautifully written essays, Andrew Sarris summarizes the careers of perhaps 80 to 100 American directors. Each essay is preceded by a filmography, with the films Sarris judges to be the director's most important in italics. (An appendix gives the author's lists of most important American films by year.)
Sarris groups directors into categories including "Pantheon Directors," "The Far Side of Paradise," "Lightly Likeable," "Expressive Esoterica" and "Less Than Meets the Eye." Sarris is an avowed auteurist, meaning that he considers that in the great majority of films, the director's contribution is decisive.
I have used the book as a guide for my movie and video viewing for the past 20 years, and the rewards have been vast.
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Format: Paperback
Extolling the virtues of The American Cinema would be too hard. Beside being an invaluable reference for cinema between 1929-1968, it also contains wonderful peices of film theory. Because of this The American Cinema can be read a few pages at a time or you can completely dwelve into the material. No matter the method, Sarris will engage you in a meaningful dialogue of film. Film literature is rarely able to be this give and take. Those with an above average inclination toward cinema should purchase.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read this many years ago and am planning to re-read it. The part about the tension between the material and the artist never made much sense and Sarris never applied it during his movie reviewing career. We all read it because it was a touchstone on what to watch and a tool for organizing your thinking about films and what separates a good director from a great one. You can pretty much find the bad ones on your own. The fight between Sarris and Pauline Karl enriched film criticism. They were equally matched great critics. There willnever be another pair like them or as illuminating as they were. David Debby and Anthony Lane apparently no longer work at the New Yorker and the magazine isn't saying why. I called the magazine to inquire and never received a return call. I'm discovering RogerEbert's writing after years of thinking he was a jerk on television.Anybody worth reading that I'm overlooking?
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