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Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: First edition (first printing). A fine copy in a fine dust jacket. Provenance: Acquired from the estate of the singer, songwriter, and poet Rod McKuen, with his bookplate. First Edition. Jacket: Fine.
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American Denim: A New Folk Art Hardcover – December, 1975

5.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 156 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. (December 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810902915
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810902916
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,956,435 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
This is a charming, historically-important, and well-produced book from 1975 that highlights the work of about 50 denim artists.

The concept is simple: these men and women took denim garments and changed them. There's a wide range of techniques here: applique, embroidery and other needlepoint techniques, distressing, intergration of other fabrics, painting, studding. Man, the metal and glass studding done by Bill Shire on p. 37! Absolutely baroque -- in all the right ways.

This is similar to a book that came out at about the same time, Native Funk and Flash. Native Funk, however, was a scruffy little trade paperback. This was produced like an art book from a major publisher (and may well be the first ever such book to receive such first-class packaging!) It was worth it. The quality of the photography here is superb -- particularly the detail shots.

The intentions of the artists here are varied. Some of them are coming straight out of the hippie "I drew on my dirty jeans" school. Others are clearly fabric artists interested in seeing how they can transform garments into something new. Some of them are fashion designers, looking to take street wear to a fashion-conscious and upscale place. And some are just pure folk artists -- "I wanted to have two naked chicks with pubic hair on my jacket so I made this."

Whatever their intentions, the work exhibited in this book is remarkable. And every stereotype you might have in your head about the mid-70's being a stylistic nadir will be challenged by the groovy stuff here. I think that's the BIG THING: applique jeans with flowers and butterflies aren't automatically a joke. They can be an object of great beauty.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a charming, historically-important, well-produced book from 1975 that highlights the work of about 50 denim artists.

The concept is simple: take denim garments and change them. There's a wide range of techniques here: applique, embroidery and other needlepoint techniques, distressing, intergration of other fabrics, painting, studding.

This is similar to a book that came out at about the same time --- Native Funk and Flash. Native Funk, however, was a scruffy little trade paperback. This was produced like an art book from a major publisher (and may well be the first ever such book to receive such first-class packaging.) It was worth it. The quality of the photography here is superb -- particularly the detail shots.

The intentions of the artists here are varied. Some of them are part of the hippie "I drew on my dirty jeans" school. Others are fabric artists interested in how they can transform garments. Some of them are fashion designers, looking to take street wear to a fashion-conscious and upscale place. And some are just pure folk artists -- "I wanted to have two naked chicks with pubic hair on my jacket so I made this." My favorite: the metal and glass studding done by Bill Shire on p. 37 Absolutely baroque -- in all the right ways.

Whatever their intentions, the work exhibited in this book is remarkable. And every stereotype you might have about the mid-70's being a stylistic nadir will be challenged by the groovy stuff here. I think that's the BIG THING about this movement: applique jeans with flowers and butterflies aren't automatically a joke. They can be an object of great beauty.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
My mother hand stitched a pair of shorts for me just like the ones on the cover of this book back in the VERY early 80's! She checked and re-elected this book out of the library over and over again. I knew how much she loved this book, so it made the perfect gift idea for her. A walk down memory lane!
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Format: Hardcover
This is a charming, historically-important, and well-produced book from 1975 that highlights the work of about 50 denim artists.

The concept is simple: these men and women took denim garments and changed them. There's a wide range of techniques here: applique, embroidery and other needlepoint techniques, distressing, intergration of other fabrics, painting, studding. Man, the metal and glass studding done by Bill Shire on p. 37! Absolutely baroque -- in all the right ways.

This is similar to a book that came out at about the same time, Native Funk and Flash. Native Funk, however, was a scruffy little trade paperback. This was produced like an art book from a major publisher (and may well be the first ever such book to receive such first-class packaging!) It was worth it. The quality of the photography here is superb -- particularly the detail shots.

The intentions of the artists here are varied. Some of them are coming straight out of the hippie "I drew on my dirty jeans" school. Others are clearly fabric artists interested in seeing how they can transform garments into something new. Some of them are fashion designers, looking to take street wear to a fashion-conscious and upscale place. And some are just pure folk artists -- "I wanted to have two naked chicks with pubic hair on my jacket so I made this."

Whatever their intentions, the work exhibited in this book is remarkable. And every stereotype you might have in your head about the mid-70's being a stylistic nadir will be challenged by the groovy stuff here. I think that's the BIG THING: applique jeans with flowers and butterflies aren't automatically a joke. They can be an object of great beauty.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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