Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

  • List Price: $30.00
  • Save: $6.00 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The American Encounter wi... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A well read book that still in great shape. This book has wear to the edges and corners of book cover, may have some creases and may have some hand writing on the inside of front cover.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent Paperback – November 6, 2000

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.00
$19.99 $0.96

Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Save up to 40% during Wiley's Summer Savings Event. Learn more.
$24.00 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent
  • +
  • Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism under Colonialism
Total price: $58.00
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is one of the finest books I have read in a long time. (William H. Swatos, Jr., "Sociology of Religion""

"Indispensable reading for anyone interested in the history of Buddhism in America. (Jan Nattier, Indiana University)"

"An important and original contribution to American intellectual and social history. (Robert S. Ellwood, ("Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography")"

"This book is an important contribution to the sometime rancorous debate about what American Buddhism ought to look like and how it can best be adapted to American culture in ways that will insure both its success in the future and its integrity. (Richard Hughes Seager, Hamilton College)"

This is one of the finest books I have read in a long time. (William H. Swatos, Jr., "Sociology of Religion"

Indispensable reading for anyone interested in the history of Buddhism in America. (Jan Nattier, Indiana University)

An important and original contribution to American intellectual and social history. (Robert S. Ellwood, ("Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography")

This book is an important contribution to the sometime rancorous debate about what American Buddhism ought to look like and how it can best be adapted to American culture in ways that will insure both its success in the future and its integrity. (Richard Hughes Seager, Hamilton College)

Review

This is one of the finest books I have read in a long time. . . . I find the account particularly worthwhile for its sensitivity to how the American Buddhists and their Asian allies worked to shape their account of Buddhism to address the core value concerns of Victorian America. . . . I highly recommend it.--William H. Swatos, Jr., Sociology of Religion



Indispensable reading for anyone interested in the history of Buddhism in America.--Jan Nattier, Indiana University



When first published, Tweed's American Encounter with Buddhism raised questions about how Buddhism could be assimilated to American ideals and values. Its republication has a timeliness now that the dharma has taken on far greater prominence in the 'new pluralism' of the nation's religious landscape. This book is an important contribution to the sometime rancorous debate about what American Buddhism ought to look like and how it can best be adapted to American culture in ways that will insure both its success in the future and its integrity.--Richard Hughes Seager, author of Buddhism in America



An important and original contribution to American intellectual and social history. . . . After reading [it], one is not likely ever again to think of America in quite the same way as before. . . . Highly recommended.--Robert S. Ellwood, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography



This paperback reprint of the highly acclaimed 1992 hardback is welcome, enabling it to become even more widely accessible to scholars and students. . . . Details and examples are combined with discussion of broader trends in a masterful synthesis.--Journal of American Studies

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; Revised ed. edition (November 6, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807849065
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807849064
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #387,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
50%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This historical and sociological study of Buddhism in the U.S. from 1844 to 1912 provides insight not only into American Buddhism but also into American culture in the Victorian period and the interactions between new religious movements and the values and beliefs of the dominant culture. The book is academic but not obtuse, and it's relatively engaging.

Tweed explores in detail the ways in which European-American converts to and sympathizers with Buddhism in the Victorian period both dissented from the dominant culture and also consented to it, and he observes that to be successful, a new or transplanted religious movement needs to be different but not too different from the dominant culture. Tweed argues that Buddhist adherents and sympathizers shared a number of basic Victorian American values and beliefs that Buddhism, as it was then understood, seemed to contradict: theism; individualism (a label that Tweed actually uses for two distinct things: the belief in a substantial and immortal self and an emphasis on self-reliance); optimism (a belief in the basic goodness and inevitable progress of individuals and history); and activism (an emphasis on moral action to uplift individuals and reform societies). In contrast, Buddhism was seen as atheistic, nihilistic, pessimistic, and passive. Although some Americans attracted to Buddhism were able to reject theism and the belief in a substantial self, very few were able to relinquish their commitments to optimism and activism, and they rejected interpretations of Buddhism as pessimistic and passive.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this great book. Provides interesting resources and history on the development of Buddhism in the United States
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent