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American hunger

4.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0060804640
ISBN-10: 0060804645
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 146 pages
  • Publisher: Perennial Library/Harper & Row (1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060804645
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060804640
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,069,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read this book a few years ago after I found out it was the sequel to Black Boy, a book which made a great impression on me. The same superb prose and insight into the human condition I found in Black Boy continued in American Hunger. I'm a black man. One of the things I hate about this present time is that we black folk have become too used to thinking of ourselves in terms of a color. It's as if we are people attached to a color, not human beings who just happen to be black. Unfortunately I think we are perpetuating this problem ourselves more than anyone is foisting it on us. The thing I most admire about the writings of men like Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison was their portrayal of the black person as just that - a person. A human being dealing with a dilemma. And since all human beings deal with dilemmas that puts us all in the same boat no matter what our racial background. In American Hunger, Richard Wright shows how a black human being coped with a fundament! al problem - being seen as less than but knowing he was more. And he did it in such a way that any human being can identify with him and learn from his experience. This sort of writing is much needed today when it is assumed that a "black" problem can only be understood by black people, thereby putting them on some alien and unreachable level. Wright shows that we are part of the human family, very understandable and "just plain folks" when you get down to it.
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Format: Hardcover
American hunger published in 1944 by Harper & Row is the sequel to Black Boy.

Richard Wright( R W ) leaves the South to move to Chicago and later on to New-York city ; it is the period of 1927 to 1937, the period of a young adult , 19 years old to 29 years old.

Within 6 chapters and and Afterword by the French specialist Michel Fabre ( about 146 pages ), RW tells us about his efforts to become a writer. We learn that he reads a lot ( 5 hours a day ) books by solid writers like Proust( Remembrances), the American Mercury review in its best years, Gertrude Stein( Three Lives), Stephen Crane (The Red Badge of Courage), Dostoevski ( Possessed).

He also begins to practice his writing , working in a cafe or at the post office but spending the rest of his time on practising the craft of writing.

It is also an opportunity for him to read sociology and psychology books and develop his critique of American materialistic society.

An inspiring text for today college students and junior writers. Strongly recommended.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Jambo. Contrary to what "A Customer" has posted in review, Richard Wright does not ignore race and the "black" aspect in his writings of BLACK Boy and American Hunger. He simply does not focus on such adjectives that suggest a "black struggle" in excess. Race is a part of Wright's life and those in his works whether some of you like or accept that is irrelevant. Ignoring the mentioning of race to mechanically gain proper recognition from others is a cheat. Identifying race as a component of a person's or story's description should not make people view it with any less accuracy or relevance. If people can't do that, then they need to not be so mentally weak. You can not play a race card if none are dealt, or better yet, not in the deck to begin with. This book can interest and educate anyone, but the "Black-Experience" side should be noticed and greatly appreciated by those of you considered or self-considered to be Black. If there is problem with terms like black and white, it should be the English use of black for things bad and white for things good and connotations of these ideas being tossed into the use of black and white for race. Quality of this book for the price is great. Though, if you have not read the book preceding this sequel, you'll find the kindle price much higher for that one. Typical tactics escape not Amazon. Enjoy the reading. Oh, if you haven't read Wright's classic, Native Son, read it. Od'abo!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Intelligently and eloquently written story of a most difficult and tragic time in American history for Black folks. Very interesting period when some "Negroes" sought acceptance and validation in the Communist party. Can't believe that I'm just now reading this book after all these decades when it was first written.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although I am only through the first two chapters I always wondered what happened to that little boy that burned his grandmother's house in the opening chapter of Black Boy.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent book. Race in the early 1900s was a painful situation, and Richard Wright's burning intellect and tremendous grace gives us a look into his world.
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