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Angry Mobs and Founding Fathers: The Fight for Control of the American Revolution by [Newton, Michael E.]
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Angry Mobs and Founding Fathers: The Fight for Control of the American Revolution Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From the Author

"The book frequently is thought-provoking. Although Newton makes no explicit link, readers will be struck by the parallels between the relationship of the American colonists of 1750 through 1770 with the British Parliament and that of average Americans with today's political class... If you read it, you will find it rewarding." -- Galveston County Daily News

"Michael Newton's latest book, Angry Mobs and Founding Fathers, is a densely packed, meticulously researched, compendium of  historical knowledge... Newton explores the motivations of the "angry mobs" and Founding Fathers, from the colonial period, through the American Revolution, the failure of the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention,  and Ratification.  Newton clearly depicts the ebb and flow of power and participation between these two groups." -- What Would The Founders Think?

About the Author

Michael E. Newton earned multiple degrees and graduated summa cum laude from Arizona State University. He currently writes about the financial markets and is also the author of The Path to Tyranny: A History of Free Society's Descent into Tyranny.

Product Details

  • File Size: 482 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0982604025
  • Publisher: Eleftheria Publishing (July 14, 2011)
  • Publication Date: July 14, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005CW519Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #559,976 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Benjamin D. Steele on July 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm not sure what my overall opinion is.

The author was attempting balance by focusing on the two separate groups of angry mobs and founding fathers, but I'm not sure how well he succeeded. Maybe he succeeded as well as could be expected using that framework.

These two categories are too broad and sweeping. The diversity was immense in those early generations, diversity among the populations of different colonies and regions along with diversity among the upper classes. Also there was crossover between the two general categories. The reality of that historical period is just too messy for such neat categories.

The more I read of this book, it became clear how much the author was coming from a particular political viewpoint. Some of his 'analysis' seemed more like personal opinion.

I suspect this explains the overly simplistic framework. Rather than creating a framework to fit the evidence, the evidence was being made to fit the framework. This isn't to say the framework is utterly useless and the author entirely wrong, but I will say it felt intelllectually dissatisfying. The simplistic framework would sometimes lead to simplistic statements which frustrated me. I'd have preferred more nuance and depth.

Beyond the framework issue, I found more tiresome the treatment of slavery. The author's defense of slavery in early America sometimes came across as right-wing apologetics. Slavery was what it was. I don't think it needs to be rationalized with arguments about economics.

Besides, slavery wasn't just about economics. Slavery was about a particular culture and social order. The Deep South slaveholders had a lifestyle of power and privilege that wasn't sustainable without slavery.
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Format: Paperback
Angry Mobs and Founding Fathers: The Fight for Control of the American Revolution is chock full of interesting facts, startling patterns, and answers to questions that were never raised in my social studies classes. Who knew that all of the colonists weren't English? How could I have studied the revolution and never heard the name Apollos Rivoire? Of course western expansion needed the railroads to be developed first. Why didn't anybody ever tell me that before?

If today's Tea Party, by virtue of its very name, is a throwback to the angry mobs of yesteryear, who are the people who will step up to be our new founding fathers?

The angry mobs brought us a revolution. The founding fathers developed the miracle of our Constitution, to prevent that revolution from descending into chaos, anarchy and tyranny.

Michael E. Newton presents the American revolution and the twists and turns of the first decades of our country in a book that is readable and enjoyable, one that I wish I could have read years ago.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I picked up Angry Mobs and Founding Fathers as I had read Michael Newton's previous book The Path to Tyranny: A History of Free Society's Descent into Tyranny and really enjoyed it. His new book lives up to the same quality as the previous one and I would highly recommend both to anybody.

The book covers the social side of the American revolution and covered aspects of the whole thing that I was largely unaware of. The American revolution is often compared to the French revolution, with the American revolution being seen as the thinking mans revolution and the French revolution as the revolution of the mob. It was fascinating to see how close the grand American experiment came to becoming just another "also ran" mob based revolution and how the genius of the founding fathers prevented it descending into one.

I can't recommend this book highly enough as a behind the scenes look at a time in history that came perilously close to going off the rails.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So much is written of the Founding Fathers it's easy to believe that the American Revolution was fought by a total of fifty-six men. (Give or take a few, depending on your perspective.) I have been looking for something that gave me more insights into the views of the average rabble-rousing colonial or even those caught in the middle. As with my fiction reviews, it makes sense to focus on the two main characters in the story.

The Angry Mobs: For the most part, these "mobs" remain the nameless, faceless masses of colonials they are in almost every history book. There is some mention of names, especially with mob action that was associated with a specific person, e.g., Shay's Rebellion. However, even with a discussion on the motivation of the mobs, I came away with the feeling that one mob was much like another. Yet, I have to wonder if they weren't as different from each other, not just in their ideologies but also in their approach, as the Occupy Wall Streeters are from the Tea Party.

The Founding Fathers: On this side of the equation I got more than I hoped for. Unlike many historians, Mr. Newton has a background in economics and was able to add a layer of detail that is lacking in accounts of the Revolution and the years that followed. If you've ever wondered how the United States went from a country struggling with war debt and under constant threat of war between the states to one of the most prosperous nations on Earth within a few decades, Newton lays it all out for you in details that even the non-economist can appreciate. Hint: He spends a fair amount of time on Alexander Hamilton's role.

I'm giving this one four stars mostly because I felt it could have been two books: one that did the title justice and focused more on the mobs, and a second that focused on the economics of the Revolution and the nation-building years.
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