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Showing 1-10 of 23 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 39 reviews
on December 4, 2016
The images in this book are remarkable both for their beauty and the insight they give into the mind of a great artist. Excellent color film, most notably Kodachrome, was available pretty much from the beginning of Adam's career. He simply preferred not to use it. This was not because there is anything "special" or "magical" or "oh, so artistic" about black and white photographs. Adams considered his primary artistry to be in the darkroom making the print, with the negative just a means to that end. Transparency film in general, and especially Kodachrome, relies on getting the image correct at the moment the shutter is fired. If it is wrong at that instant nothing can be done in the darkroom to fix it.

Black and white photography has its place, but that place is not landscapes or nature. The essence of nature is color and no amount of skilled composition or talent in the darkroom can resurrect the sterile, bleak, desolate, and lifeless black and white landscapes normally associated with Adams. The images in this book leap off the page with dimensions of complexity and beauty completely lacking from Adam's typical work. The tonal rendering may seem a bit dark or retro to those used to more modern processes, but it is very faithful to Kodachrome's look.
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on May 7, 2015
Decades ago, I remember being surprised to come across a book in a library on Hawaii with fading color photographs by Ansel Adams. Shocking. Now we have the second edition of this excellent little (would that it were a larger size) book which gives background information to Ansel's forays into color. Can you *imagine* 8x10 Kodachromes? I can. He certainly did -- and did it extremely well as he did all facets of his chosen medium.

Those familiar with Ansel's monochrome work may be surprised to find a few of their polychrome equivalents. Color reproduction here is excellent. You may be tempted to frame some of these but that would mean taking the book apart.

The book is well written, very informative, nicely designed, well printed, and Ansel Adams. Who could ask for more?
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on March 11, 2016
Ansel Adams is best known for his iconic black and white photography, but what he shot in color is just as stunning. In particular, the work he did in Yellowstone Natural Park is amazing. I have a litho of one of these photos ("Pool Detail", pg 70), and this book was helpful in finding other work I want to display. It's printed on clay-covered paper, giving each page a premium feel and showing crisp detail. This is essential reading for the Ansel Adams fan, and a great book for your coffee table.
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on March 13, 2017
The pictures are beautiful, yet it's apparent that digital imagery has provided much progress to the ability to create beautiful images.
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on March 25, 2017
Such beauty captured by the camera.
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on June 9, 2011
This beautiful book took my breath away. I have long been a fan of Ansel Adams's black-and-white photography since my father introduced me to his work in the early 1980's. As a budding photographer, at that time, I often found myself emulating his work. Until recently, I had not even considered the fact that Ansel Adams had photographically recorded the world in color. I must admit that I was skeptical at first. I thought how could color photographs compare to the amazing clarity and stark contrasts found in his black-and-white work? I was wrong! These color photos are full of clean and stunning imagery. I bought this book to share with my father for his birthday and anticipate his reaction. I am sure he will be as stunned and pleased with this book as I am.
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on December 25, 2016
Seeing Ansel’s work in color is a revelation. He admitted that he never got color in the same way he did B&W. Perhaps that’s because they really are two different ways of looking at the world around us. None the less his color work is outstanding on its own.
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on July 30, 2017
This book is amazing. The printing of the photos is first rate, and the added letters and writings from Ansel give a unique insight into his thoughts.
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on September 2, 2013
after reading about Ansel Adams color photography I finally found this book. What a find and what a book. His color photography is fantastic but not as dramatic as his black and whites.
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VINE VOICEon February 14, 2008
As a photographer with over 50 years of experience with cameras, I found the color photos by Ansel Adams interesting and enjoyable to peruse. But, the most important aspect of this book for me were the quoted passages from Ansel's letters and other writings regarding the challenges of making meaningful and art-level color photographs. Ansel envisioned the coming world of color photography and even foresaw the post negative film era that might happen as he wrote many years ago when color slide film was his choice for its stability and vividness. But, when he wrote his book, the color films then available to the photographer did not enable the degree of post-camera manipulation and fine tuning of photographs that we enjoy today with digital photography.
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