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Antichrist (The Criterion Collection)

3.5 out of 5 stars 223 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Lars von Trier (Europa, Breaking the Waves, Dancer in the Dark) shook up the film world when he premiered Antichrist at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival. In this graphic psychodrama, a grief-stricken man and woman—a searing Willem Dafoe (Platoon, The Last Temptation of Christ) and Cannes best actress Charlotte Gainsbourg (Jane Eyre, 21 Grams)—retreat to a cabin deep in the woods after the accidental death of their infant son, only to find terror and violence at the hands of nature and, ultimately, each other. But this most confrontational work yet from one of contemporary cinema’s most controversial artists is no mere provocation. It is a visually sublime, emotionally ravaging journey to the darkest corners of the possessed human mind; a disturbing battle of the sexes that pits rational psychology against age-old superstition; and a profoundly effective horror film.

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by von Trier and professor Murray Smith
  • Video interviews with von Trier and actors Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg
  • A collection of video pieces delving into the production of Antichrist
  • "Chaos Reigns at the Cannes Film Festival 2009," a documentary
  • Three theatrical trailers
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film scholar Ian Christie

  • Product Details

    • Actors: Willem Dafoe, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Storm Acheche Sahlstrøm
    • Directors: Lars von Trier
    • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC, Special Edition, Widescreen
    • Language: English
    • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
    • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
    • Number of discs: 2
    • Rated:
      NR
      Not Rated
    • Studio: Criterion Collection
    • DVD Release Date: November 9, 2010
    • Run Time: 108 minutes
    • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (223 customer reviews)
    • ASIN: B003KGBISE
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #49,710 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
    • Learn more about "Antichrist (The Criterion Collection)" on IMDb

    Customer Reviews

    Top Customer Reviews

    By A. Mazzola on September 21, 2010
    Format: Blu-ray
    So, a lot of people seem to be inquiring, myself included, about whether this version is the uncut or cut version of the film... so I decided to do a little digging...

    I E-Mailed Criterion at [...] yesterday and got an E-Mail back today from a Karen Mesoznik who works there and this is what she had to say:

    Hi Aaron,

    Thanks for your email!

    We are issuing the uncut version of this film (108 minutes). Our master is the same version as the one that premiered at Cannes; IFC did not edit the film for release here. It's possible there may be some confusion due to the French DVD which incorrectly states the run time as 120 minutes.

    I hope this information is helpful. Thanks you for supporting Criterion and please let me know if you have any more questions!

    Best,

    Karen
    The Criterion Collection

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So, I wondered what she meant by the French DVD stating 120, so I dug a little deeper and found out that the French DVD in fact states the film at 120 minutes, but the film itself is actually 108 minutes (uncut). There is no 120 minute version of the film. 108 minutes IS in fact the longest running time. The cut versions range from 100-104 minutes (depending on where and how you view the movie). If you have seen the 108 minute version, then you've seen it all, and THIS is what Criterion will be releasing. (The film in all of its unsettling glory!)

    I hope this helped you guys! I will definately be purchasing this version myself. Hopefully this persuades people to do the same.

    If anyone has any further doubts, feel free to E-Mail Criterion yourself at the E-Mail address mentioned earlier in my post!
    16 Comments 371 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: DVD
    Lars von Trier's latest film caused quite a stir when it made it's debut at the Cannes Film Festival this year. Audiences there were divided, with some calling it beautiful and brilliant, while many others called it repulsive and pornographic. Antichrist is essentially an art film with many horror film elements. It has very graphic scenes of sexual imagery, as well as sexual mutilation...This is what has scared many filmgoers who have not given the film the attention it deserves.

    The film's Prologue shows a couple (Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg) engaged in passionate (and, in one shot, explicit) lovemaking as their young son falls from a window to his death. This scene, shot in black and white, is one of the most beautifully filmed scenes I have ever seen in a film. The following is presented in four chapters; Grief, Pain (Chaos Reigns), Despair (Gynocide), and The Three Beggars, followed by an Epilogue. It follows He and She coping, He better than her. She is mad with grief, while He has found a way to muffle his emotions. The two go to their cabin in the woods (called "Eden"), so He (a therapist) can help her further.

    It's when chapter three begins that the scenes that had Cannes talking begin. This chapter specifically contains the most well-known image from the film of Dafoe and Gainsbourg under a tree, an image I find deeply unsettling in a film filled with unsettling images. Many viewers have mentioned the talking fox as being laughable, but I found it quite creepy and well-done. Von Trier uses CGI in this film, but it's a beautifully rendered use of the technology and it's not used often.

    This is a movie filled with symbolism; some obvious, some a little more inconspicuous.
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    Comment 75 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: Blu-ray
    A woman and a man lose their son in a tragic accident. Rather than trust in the medicine prescribed by her psychiatrist to ease her grief, he (a psychotherapist) decides to subject her to his own therapeutic regime. She (in an incredibly devastating performance by Charlotte Gainsbourg) will face her fears directly, and see that there is nothing to fear. He doesn't consider that he may have something to fear from her, or that he, with his clinical detachment from feeling and incessant preoccupation with the stance of observer, may be the one who truly needs therapy. (On that note it is hard not to detect a kinship of the themes of this film with the themes of von Trier and Jorgen Leth's The Five Obstructions, that set up von Trier himself as therapist to Leth, whose capacity for aesthetic detachment he found troubling).

    The imagery in the film is fascinating and frightening - it is certainly von Trier's most accomplished film in terms of cinematography, and it definitely deserves to get the Criterion treatment. The prologue and epilogue are highly formalistic, shot in a series of powerful black and white images that border on the unreal; the rest of the film, broken into four chapters, is shot handheld with washed out but saturated colors, with rippling natural imagery and occasional freaks of nature that as a whole evokes a darker vision of Tarkovsky's zone (from Stalker).
    Read more ›
    18 Comments 143 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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