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The Antichrist by [Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm]
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The Antichrist Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 52 customer reviews

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Length: 69 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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About the Author

Friedrich Nietzsche was a nihilist philosopher, critic and poet who wrote several works of philosophy which have proven strongly influential since their initial publication in the late 19th century. After beginning his academic career as an expert in ancient Greek and Latin, Nietzsche would steadily advance into philosophy, becoming more convinced and sure of his arguments as time went by. Gradually, his writings became more polemical and provocative, criticising earlier philosophers, established institutions such as the Christian church, and its moral tenets in a series of vehement and swiftly paced writings which at times veer into humorous sarcasm. Nietzsche's final work was The Antichrist, which was completed a short time before a mental breakdown which rendered the scholar incapacitated for the final decade of his life. By the time of his death in 1900 at the age of 55, Nietzsche had assembled a large and devoted following, particularly within academic and scholarly circles, which continues to this day.

Product Details

  • File Size: 286 KB
  • Print Length: 69 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: March 30, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004UJ2GCW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,118 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Nietzsche, on the verge of a complete breakdown, wrote four short but tremendous books, including this one. Even here, he is proud of his philological training:

'... One may rest assured that the greater the degree of a man's intellectual conscience the greater will be his modesty, his discretion, on this point. [...]"Truth," as the word is understood by every prophet, every sectarian, every free-thinker, every Socialist and every churchman, is simply a complete proof that not even a beginning has been made in the intellectual discipline and self-control that are necessary to the unearthing of even the smallest truth.--The deaths of the martyrs, it may be said in passing, have been misfortunes of history: they have misled....'

Speaking of texts, I have been comparing the Mencken translation with Kaufmann's later translation, and while I can accept that the early 20th C. translations were for the most part woefully inadequate, HLM's may be the exception. Here is a passage from Mencken, with a few words that are different, but not demonstrably better, in WK's (for the most part, the two translations are very close):

'.. When the exceptional man handles the mediocre man with more delicate fingers than he applies to himself or to his equals, this is not merely kindness [WK: "politeness" ?] of heart--it is simply his duty.... Whom do I hate most heartily among the rabbles of today? The rabble of Socialists, the apostles to the Chandala, who undermine the workingman's instincts, his pleasure, his feeling of contentment with his petty [WK: "small"- surely "petty" is more apt] existence--who make him envious and teach him revenge.... Wrong never lies in unequal rights; it lies in the assertion of "equal" rights.... What is bad? But I have already answered: all that proceeds from weakness, from envy, from revenge.--The anarchist and the Christian have the same ancestry....'
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I am a committed atheist and have found satisfaction in reading the works and essays of greater minds than mine. In this respect the Christopher Hitchins book "Portable Atheist" is a good read. This book is somewhat harder to read and in many respects reminds of the Thomas Paine book "Age of Reason", in that they are both a strong argument, mixed with contempt, of the established church. Both books were revolutionary in their time but are a little passe now, but maybe worth the effort. I still think Hitchins has the better book though.
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Nietzsche's final work, published in 1895 posits his position upon the state of Christianity and his opinion of Christendom for the masses. This is not to be confused with an attack upon the religion, it's true practices and benefits before the taint, manipulation and debasement by the human hand, for there is a noted difference.

Christianity, seen as a conspiracy impeding the progress of mankind, reserved for the corpus of ignorant men (95-96%) and full of lofty `moral' ideals which, in purpose, turn weaknesses into strength. To glorify timidity, cowardice and general weakness, making these types of people "The Chosen" is completely juxtaposed with the concept of the `ubermensch' (Superman) and any thinking man's `Will to Power' (that alone which makes one feel good).

Further, Christianity glorifies `faith' - which basically translates to `ask no questions and follow blindly' establishing a loss of instinct and reaction.

In regards to the apostles and other men of the cloth: `Whoever has theological blood in his veins is shifty and dishonorable in all things'. `Virtue' and `morality' are human contrivances and coupled with religion create misconceptualizations based upon imaginary cause and effect (being philanthropic gets you into heaven). This lie is seen as an escapist tactic, and who wants to escape reality except those that suffer because of it?

The priest, the most revered man of the cloth, Nietzsche sees as a human parasite designed to speak on behalf of, represent and take penance for God - the primary bastion, champion on earth, of upholding weakness, false morality and the undermining force behind the `Will to Power'.
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Wish I had read this a long time ago. Maybe my transition to non-belief would have come sooner. The frustration & disgust that he delivers is not quite unlike what I feel, even today.
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By will crow on December 10, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
nietzche is some thinker. he bundles up the lesser man and their progeny with tight, concise language, leaving no wiggle room to do aught but breed. which is what chattel does. he is surely posthumously born.
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Format: Paperback
The irony of Nietzsche is his readings of the original classical writings, in the original languages. Very brilliant, sure, but it's ironic because the Christians preserved the writings Nietzsche will one day read to demolish Christianity.

How do we know that the Christians preserved the pagan writings? Well like the way you and I will eventually fall back into the elements, paper also falls back into the elements. Those books on the shelve look immortal to us, but they will vanish in about 500 years from now. We don't notice because biology is on fast forward, but even the mountains will one day vanish! "Panta rhei" said Nietzsche favourite philosopher, 'all flows'.

Christians preserved the ancient world? Surely not! The idea that the Christians destroyed the buildings and loved book burning can no longer be taken seriously. The image of rampaging Christians, dressed in black, like in the excellent film, Agora, is a modern fantasy for people who like to believe that Islam is a part of Europe and that Mozart was an Arab. Nietzsche also believed this for some strange reason.

Those Christian monks copied what they felt was important. Scrolls need the expensive process of being copied every generation or so to be saved from oblivion, so the monks in the apparent 'dark age' copied Cicero and Caesar and the Orthodox Christians copied Homer, bloody Homer.

Anyway, this is an excellent translation. What Nietzsche says is probably true. Maybe we can test these ideas? Do people in India act like Pagans or do they act like Christians? I ask because pagan Europe was very similar to India and this is why Westerners find that land so intoxicating. So we must test if Nietzsche is correct.
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