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Aoxomoxoa

4.3 out of 5 stars 95 customer reviews

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Audio CD, February 25, 2003
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Editorial Reviews

Four bonus tracks including a rarely performed live Cosmic Charlie and three ultra-rare studio jams from the summer of '68!

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. St. Stephen
  2. Dupree's Diamond Blues
  3. Rosemary
  4. Doin' That Rag
  5. Mountains Of The Moon
  6. China Cat Sunflower
  7. What's Become Of The Baby
  8. Cosmic Charlie
  9. Clementine Jam
  10. Nobody's Spoonful Jam
  11. The Eleven Jam
  12. Cosmic Charlie (Live)


Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 25, 2003)
  • Rmst ed. edition
  • Original Release Date: 1969
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rhino
  • ASIN: B00007LTII
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,595 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The Grateful Dead's third studio album "Aoxomoxoa" serves as a bridging gap between the band's psychedelic experiments and the harmony-laced folk-rock they would adopt a few years later. The album still remains a favorite amongst Deadheads and includes concert staples such as "Saint Stephen", "China Cat Sunflower" and "Cosmic Charlie". There are also some fun sing-along moments such as the memorable "Dupree's Diamond Blues" and "Doin' That Rag". "Rosemary" and "Mountains of the Moon" are beautiful acoustic pieces that fuse folk and baroque influences into the mix. Then, there's the infamous "What's Become Of The Baby" which is nothing but 8-minutes worth of Jerry Garcia chanting with vast amounts of echo plastered on his voice. Depending on who you talk to, this track is either the Dead's finest studio moment or their absolute worst. Either way, the track certainly is different.
The Rhino/Warner remaster includes four additional tracks which brings this album to more than double of its original length. The first three bonus tracks are extended instrumental jams recorded live in the studio. Like always, the band's musicianship and ability to play off each other comes through effortlessly in these jams. There is a definite jazz-fusion feel to these improvisations. "The Eleven Jam" is particularly striking with it's use of odd time signatures (mostly 11/8). The bonus material closes with a rare live recording of "Cosmic Charlie" which is a bit raw and rough but solid.
Since it's initial release 35 years ago "Aoxomoxoa" has become an instant Dead classic.
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Format: Audio CD
though "blues for allah" is probably the most accurate studio representation of what the dead truly were and are, "aoxomoxoa" is still my favorite dead record. it was recorded right when the band was making the natural transistion from bluesy psychedelic music and into a more folkish country sound. you can really hear the two musical realms butt heads. even the simple folk songs like "rosemary" and "mountains of the moon" have a real ambient psychedelic mood to them. however, "what's become of the baby" is definitely the oddest track on the album and is almost too spooky to listen to. dead naysayers who claim that the band wasn't dark and were only into singing about good times have obviously never heard this track. the album also includes the future concert staples "china cat sunflower" and "st. stephen," but a really good track that the band all but abondanded not too long after the record's release is "doin' that rag." it's got a lot of great effects and time changes and really sounds like the musical equivalent to going insane. this record really captures a great transistional period in the band's history and will grow on you immensely after repeated listenings. the remastered version also has some great studio jams, including the only studio recording of the phenomenal live favorite "the eleven." one more great reason to buy this thing immediately
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Format: Audio CD
A transitional album for the Dead, in between the wilder psychedelic years and the return to roots music that followed. Strong songwriting and playing and good production make this one of the Dead's more successful studio albums. However, as usual, the live versions of all of these songs should be heard as well. Much of the Dead's studio work serves as a template for what the songs turned into live. That said, this is a fine album, with the exception of "What's Become of the Baby," which quite honestly could have been left off the album entirely and few would have cared.

This CD features the 1972 "remix" of the album, as every Deadhead knows. The reason for this is because no one could find the original mix of Aoxomoxoa, according to interviews with Dead archivist David LeMieux. Rhino, in conjunction with the Dead, decided that it would be better to release a strong version of the 1972 mix. The alternative would have been to release a straight album-to-CD digital transfer with inferior sound.

The included extra material, to my mind, more than makes up for the lack of the original mix. The studio jams and outtakes add a lot to this album and show that the Dead were powerful musicians, something that often gets overlooked outside the circle of Deadheads. Overall, this remaster is worth having, especially for those who aren't Deadheads per se but want to get a grip on what the Dead were all about.
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Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
My dream realized, Grateful Dead's most psychedelic album, AOXOMOXOA, as the Acid fueled Dead intended. THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THE MIX OR PRESSING. I have a copy of the original mix copied from LP on cassette, and its identical. However, if you compare this 1969 mix to the 1971 remix, it vastly different, and for the most part, vastly improved. The rationale of remixing this album created in me a nagging enigma, so I researched everything I could. In 1968-1969, when the Dead were working on this piece, Jerry Garcia and his pals were "sipping STP", a hallucinagin structurally simular to Ecstacy, but far more potent than LSD. If you became immune to LSD's effects from overuse, STP could send you on a 3 day trip. So at this point, the Grateful Dead were more tripped out than any band around. Since psychedelic music by definition is heavy, with multiple layers of guitars, percussion, keyboards, and electronic effects, and since the new 16 track tape recorders allowed musicians to indulge in endless overdubs without losing audio quality, the Dead layered serious strangeness over their mostly tranquil folk-blues songs, giving BIRTH to the trippiest acid folk album in existence. By 1971, however, the drugs wore off, and the Dead felt it nessacary to remove the excess baggage plastered over the songs. For those wanting to hear AOXOMOXOA's original mix, after 1971 copies all by disappeared. (Initially AOXOMOXOA didnt sell many copies. The Dead's fame built slowly from 1969-1972, thanks to touring, and the rise of FM underground radio.) Its also worth considering that most of the instrumentation removed, were the percussion parts of Mickey Hart, and Tom Constantine's quirky keyboard overdubs.Read more ›
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