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Apocalyptic Witchcraft Hardcover – 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 188 pages
  • Publisher: Scarlet Imprint; 1st edition (2013)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CFL8PPO
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #446,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There are some of what I suspect to be false analogies, misrepresentations and clearly unsupported arguments within this polemical piece. But, the overall thrust is dead on in numerous essential ways that supercede flaws of style and content. I don't care if it is for Llewellyn or Scarlet Imprint: use footnotes and cite your sources. Despite problems though, it is a highly pertinent entry into the current social dialog about the Craft and what we are about.

Any suggestion that Grey's invention (?) of the term "Apocalyptic Witchcraft" is a startling revelation of preternatural/primal Craft as being of the land and the womb/cauldron of the goddess (after whom the land is so often named) is utterly disingenuous. Those basic insights are long standing lore in my own Stream of Traditional Craft at least and others too from what I can surmise. For me, this is most evident in the ancient lore of the Morrigan rather than Crowley's ideas about Babalon in relationship to Ishtar/Inanna.

But again, the overarching emphasis here is productive and urges us toward motives and means that are true to who we are as witches. And we do clearly have the application of a prodiguous talent for writing in this somewhat unifying and edifying endeavor (of which there will be diverse voices in the times ahead).

Willingness to engage in malefica under certain circumstances (and for lack of a better word) is a salient fixture of Trad. Craft and not of Wicca. Hence to use this aspect as a unifying parameter among various streams of witchcraft is also disingenuous or at least ineffectual. Wiccans are apt to run not walk to the nearest exit of this 'dark' emphasis on Mr. Grey's part. I say do your own will but with discretion.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the few books concerning Witchcraft that truly impressed me.
Though I could only afford the paperback version, it is well worth three times what I paid for it.
This is not a 'how-to', a guide, or instruction manual. No spells, no formulae, no charts. Halfway between history and vision, poetry and prophesy, a call to arms is here put forth. A manifesto of the shadows can be found, as well as hints to something awake and old and savage. We need this book. You need this book; anyone that considers themselves serious about their Craft needs this book. It is unlike anything I have read before, and something in its images and verses makes my bones remember.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For a book about witchcraft, Apocalyptic Witchcraft has remarkably little to do with witches and seems mostly to focus on male magicians pursuing their desire to feel deviant and to practice sex magick to "re-enchant" the world with unnamed sexy witch-ladies. The prose also tends towards non-self-aware misogyny and chauvinism, and the Ted Hughes chapter strikes me as a rather horrid little abortion of phallologocentrism that features Ted Hughes-as-"shamanic"-master over Sylvia Plath. Ted just can't quite save his wife from the forces he helps her to unlock during her "Ariel" working. I also like to call this section the "Ted Hughes is Grey's poetic inspiration and English male 'shaman' master who erases all of Plath's agency as an artist and person." And it's about as normative as all hell, and it's as subversive and apocalyptic and witchy as the English male literary canon and tradition.

Furthermore, Grey's prose is generally disorganized, tedious, and pretentious. As someone once put it, "More matter, with less art." He and his apologists try to pass these failings off as "art" or even as "difficult truths" or as part of an enchantment, but it strikes me that a book seeking to re-enchant the world and to revitalize the magical community and to inspire people should be engaging, inspiring, enchanting, and clear, if allusive and evocative. It should seek to draw in readers, not have them rolling their eyes. As a work of rhetoric targeting the magical community, I cannot but feel it fails. Worse, it perpetuates many of the more offensive aspects of the culture it seeks to undermine. I do not think that Grey does so intentionally, but I do not think that Grey is as clever or as articulate as he and his cohort like to believe.

Instead, I would point you to Jan Fries.
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Format: Paperback
When I first got this book I was hoping it was a continuation of things that were explored in The Red Goddess, in a sense it touched on some of it but overall it goes on to other things. My first impressions when I started reading it, particularly when I came to the manifesto, was how much it seemed like I was reading Anton Laveys Satanic Bible back when I was a kid. Not a bad thing at all because it is forceful in its presentation and it makes you think. The whole book makes you think, about your purpose, your connection to the world, where you are going, and how to get to the end goal. I agree with many of his sentiments about witchcraft and have stated many of the same things for years too. I have slowly over the years came to some of the same conclusions concerning our needed connection to the natural world around us and our need to fight to preserve it. I havent gotten to the full fledged eco terrorist level yet though, lol !! It is a good book though to have on the shelf and to definitely reread in the near future.
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