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Apostolic Origins of Priestly Celibacy Paperback – October 1, 1990

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Language Notes

Text: English
Original Language: French --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 470 pages
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press; First Thus edition (October 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898709512
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898709513
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,703,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
This book launched a reconsideration of the origins of priestly celibacy. An authority no less than Henri de Lubac considered it the 20th century's most significant study in this field. Whether or not his argument holds up, it is indisputablely a careful study of the history of the issue, with many new and original insights, that take into account scholarship up through 1980 or so. The other reviewer raised concerns about the purpose of the book, which I found surprising, because it was a remarkably careful and unpolemical book (which is not true of many other books on this subject.)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent research, clear thinking in argumentation, unbiased treatment of opposing views and a readable style, even though it is technical in nature as a consequence of the theology and subject. This book helps clear up current misconceptions about clerical celibacy and really puts the arguments in the current controversy over ordaining married men against the two thousand history of the Church's following the mandate of the Apostles. The early Church ordained married men because of the shortage of single men; but look at what the wives had to put up with once their husbands were ordained!
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Format: Hardcover
If the purpose of this book is to show the historical origins and development of legitimate, differing East/West practices, it is fine. If its purpose is to argue that all churches should practice the discipline of clerical celibacy, or that clerical celibacy is a doctrinal rather than a disciplinary imperative, it is valueless.
The ordination of married men in the Catholic Church is not an "exception to the rules" nor is it contrary to or inconsistent with Catholic doctrine. Only the Latin, of 22 Catholic Churches sui iuris in communion with the Bishop of Rome, requires the discipline of clerical celibacy by canon law. The canon law of the Eastern Catholic Churches, promulgated by Pope John Paul II, is legitimately different and not inferior.
Do I think married men should be ordained in the Latin Catholic Church? Only as exceptions; the canon law should not be changed, in my opinion. Do I think married men should be ordained to the priesthood in the Eastern Catholic Churches? Yes, whenever it is consistent with their individual traditions.
This is a disciplinary, not a doctrinal, issue.
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