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Arctic Drift (A Dirk Pitt Novel, #20) (Dirk Pitt Adventure) Hardcover – Bargain Price, November 25, 2008

4.0 out of 5 stars 286 customer reviews
Book 20 of 23 in the A Dirk Pitt Adventure Series

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Hardcover, Bargain Price, November 25, 2008
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bestseller Cussler and son Dirk imagine the U.S. and Canada on the brink of war in their third collaborative Dirk Pitt novel (after Treasure of Khan and Black Wind). In 2011, as the price of gas hits $10 a gallon, President Garner Ward must contend with a corrupt Canadian cabal that's subverting efforts to solve America's energy problems. Pitt barely escapes serious injury when a bomb destroys a D.C. lab along with records of research into an artificial photosynthesis process that could, almost immediately, eliminate the threat of global warming. That discovery may be connected with a legendary failed 19th-century sailing expedition to the Arctic as well as a series of deaths due to the phenomena that the Native Americans of British Columbia know as the Devil's Breath. The Cusslers won't suspend many readers' disbelief, but thriller fans in search of a quick, exciting read should be satisfied. 750,000 printing; author tour. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Impossible to put down... a compelling sense of adventure that can rival any cinematic blockbuster Big Issue --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Dirk Pitt Adventure
  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult (November 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399155295
  • ASIN: B003XU7VQK
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.6 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (286 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,442,836 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jeff Edwards VINE VOICE on November 26, 2008
Format: Hardcover
You would be hard pressed to find a bigger fan of Dirk Pitt novels than me, and while the anxious 'sit & wait' attitude until the next adventure comes out has softened somewhat with the last 4-5 novels, I gotta admit that it's tough to beat an action-drenched sea-worthy drama like the type produced by the Cussler's.

After being totally UNDER-Whelmed by the cover of 'Arctic Drift' (easily one of the worst in the entire Pitt library), I began with earnest to get back to what I love to do most: become entirely entrenched into a world where NUMA is real and saving the world is as easy as turning the next page. This time around, a completely random discovery that may very well 100% reverse Global Warming has been discovered, only to have another nasty megalomaniac--this time around from Canada--attempt to block it in order to continue to rape the environment for profit, all the while doing his best to look like his company cares about being Green more than almost anyone.

Along the way, Dirk's children, Summer & Dirk Jr. have managed to stumble upon a dangerous arm of our nasty Canadian while doing otherwise boring research half-way to Alaska on the Canadian Coast. Of course everything becomes connected in only the way that Dirk & Co. can manage to be at the right place at the right time to help. The horrible Canadian has done his best to spark what could very well be a major conflict with America, one in which an armed response seems inevitable, and right in the middle: you guessed it...Dirk Jr., Dirk Sr., Summer & Al Giordino.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really wanted to like this latest adventure. Unfortunately, it follows the same formula as Dirk Pitt books have used since, oh, Dragon or Inca Gold. In fact, it got to the point where I was mentally ticking off the bullet points of the forumla. When a corporation was named, I knew right off it was the home of the rich and megalamaniacal bad guy. When the old guy helps Pitt out of a jam, I knew it was Cussler. When the handy character comes along, I knew it was a love interest for one of the characters.

I challenge the reader to put this alongside Raise the Titanic and see exactly what Cussler looked like in his prime.

Arctic Drift is good for a quick beach read, but unfortunately it doesn't have much staying power. Change the names around and you can have a nearly 1:1 substitution with other Pitt novels from the last ten-fifteen years.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Here are my thoughts about Arctic Drift and the last two Dirk novels: They are inferior. They weren't written by Clive. I wish they were. Yes, I understand passing the characters on to his son, but don't put your name on it to sell books. The plot is pretty good. The book wasn't terrible, but when I pick up a book with Clive Cussler on the front I want something great.

Here are my suggestion to Clive:

Let your son try and sell books with only his name on them.

Write one more Dirk Pitt book...the final one...have some crazy ending...kill Dirk, whatever. But make it good. Make it a 1000 pages if you want. Leave us with a good taste in our mouth when we think of Dirk Pitt. These last three just aren't up to par.

Again...they aren't terrible, but not near as good as the worst by Clive himself.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love Clive's books. Nobody writes them like Cussler but his political fad fettish ruined this one for me. I managed to get through his metric days with a conversion chart next to me. I've now arrived in the Dirk Pitt series at his apparent global warming awakening (that's pretty much why this book was written) and it's going to be harder to stick with it. It's distracting regardless of where you stand on the issue because it comes off as contrived and because of that, hard to follow.
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Format: Hardcover
Okay, this guy is a best-selling author who probably made more from this book than I'll make in ten years. And he's gotten many rave reviews here. So who am I to criticize it?

Well, I'm a bit of a literary snob in that I like a novel that has a great plot, compelling characters, and solid writing. This novel has an almost linear, predictable plot, cookie-cutter characters, and easily some of the most painfully bad writing I've ever encountered. I claim that a good writer takes the rules of grammar seriously. Cussler fractures our language. For example...

Basic grammar states that when you begin a sentence with a present participial phrase, the action of that phrase is concurrent with the action in the main clause:
Clutching the book to his chest, he slipped in the door.

But Cussler repeatedly uses sequential action of this sort (not from the book, but an example):
Frantically tying his shoes, he rushed from the room.

I laughed out loud several times at his incredible wording.

And oh, does he ever love to dangle participles. This gem is from the first page of Chapter 14:
The warm morning still felt comfortable, driving in a convertible.

Some of his supposed sentences made me stop dead and reread them to see if I had read them correctly. This is from the first page of Chapter 18:
They sailed in darkness for several miles until navigating a wide bend in the channel.

Some of his chapter endings were hysterical. This is how Chapter 10 ends:
"That, I'm sure, will be the least of our problems," Bob said with a hint of prophecy.

And here is the end of Chapter 5:
Somehow, she told herself, she would figure it out.
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