Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$9.88
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Orion LLC
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: .
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

An Army of Phantoms: American Movies and the Making of the Cold War Hardcover – March 15, 2011

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.95 $0.01

The Numberlys Best Books of the Year So Far
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Village Voice film critic Hoberman offers the first installment of a projected three-volume chronicle of American films during the cold war years 1946–1956. Since Hoberman sees politics "filtered through the prism of Hollywood movies—their scenarios, back stories and reception," he begins with 1950's Destination Moon, which anticipated the "space race" and called for a lunar military base, echoing a National Security Council proposal for a massive rearmament to counter the Soviet atom bomb. Onscreen antifascist heroism and more atomic associations mushroom through the early chapters. Surveying such anticommunist films as The Red Menace and The Iron Curtain, Hoberman covers witch hunts, House Committee on Un-American Activities tactics, racial dramas such as Pinky, message movies, the blacklist, protests, propaganda, HUAC humiliations, and the "Cold War's key fictional text," Orwell's 1984, all capped by a trenchant analysis of Invasion of the Body Snatchers. With exhaustive research into linkages between headlines and Hollywood, Hoberman skillfully probes movie metaphors and underlying themes in all film genres to show how cinema mirrored world events. (Apr.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review

"In An Army of Phantoms: American Movies and the Making of the Cold War, Village Voice critic J. Hoberman frames 1945 to 1956 in Hollywood's assumption that 'fantasy could be instrumentalized.' Fantasies include the voice of God on the radio, invasions from outer space, Westerns and a teenage menace. Monstrous ambitions beget screen monsters in this erudite study that's essential for anyone interested in American film....An Army of Phantoms is the prequel to Hoberman's earlier study of the 1960s, The Dream Life. Next he targets the Reagan 1980s. This Cold War saga will make you impatient for it."
San Francisco Chronicle
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: The New Press; 1St Edition edition (March 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595580050
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595580054
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #377,538 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Brian Camp on October 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
"An Army of Phantoms: American Movies and the Making of the Cold War" may be the best book I've yet read to tie together film, social and political history in the treatment of a very precise historical era. In this case, it's the postwar period from 1946 to 1957, when we saw the emergence of Cold War tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, the Korean War, the development of the H-bomb, the establishment of the Hollywood blacklist, and the rise of McCarthyism. The author is J. Hoberman, former chief film critic for New York's alternate weekly, the Village Voice, and the book is designed as a prequel to his earlier work, "The Dream Life: Movies, Media and the Mythology of the Sixties" (2003). The roughly 55 films covered in some detail range from THE BEGINNING OR THE END (1947), a glossy MGM dramatization of the development of the atomic bomb, to A FACE IN THE CROWD (1957), Elia Kazan's scathing critique of television celebrity and audience manipulation. Along the way, Hoberman examines waves of postwar combat films, cavalry westerns, alien invasion thrillers, Korean war movies, anti-communist tracts, biblical spectacles, and juvenile delinquency dramas, among other subgenres.

The book's through-line is the Cold War--and its essential conflict between capitalism and communism--and how it was viewed through the prism of Hollywood studio filmmaking, with occasional forays into documentary films, TV series and televised congressional hearings. Hoberman makes it clear that the politics of the studio personnel involved in each project had a lot to do with how these subjects were treated.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting ,enlighteningg and quite entertaining.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Pristine condition. Just as described.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
fine book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse