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Arrival UHD

4K + Blu-ray + Digital

3.8 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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$29.99 Free Shipping for Prime Members | Fast, FREE Shipping with Amazon Prime This title will be released on February 14, 2017. Pre-order now. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Product Details

  • Actors: Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, Forest Whitaker, Michael Stuhlbarg
  • Format: 4K
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish, French
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated:
    PG-13
    Parents Strongly Cautioned
  • Studio: Paramount
  • DVD Release Date: February 14, 2017
  • Run Time: 116 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B01LTHYE0O
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #153 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
This is a divisive film. You will love it or hate it, but you will have an opinion. Why are there such strong feelings? I think it results from the way the film was marketed. Critics came out raving about a new Sci-Fi film and called it wildly unpredictable. The public's interest was piqued. After all, it stars Jeremy Renner so it must be a Sci-Fi action movie, right? Maybe it's like a good Independence Day. Wrong! There is only one explosion in this film and I don't think there was a single gun fired. Whoa! What a letdown, right? No.

This is not a Sci-Fi action film. This is Sci-Fi in the same vein as Contact, Solaris, and 2001. Actually, it is very similar to 2001 in many ways and themes. If you thought 2001 was boring, you will hate this film. This is not a film about aliens. This is a film about how we react to adversity and uncertainty. You may have heard that this is a film about time travel. It's not. No one "travels" through time. This film is about supposing that time is relative (which we know it is) and perhaps even malleable if you understand it well enough. The key to understanding time in this film is language. One aspect I think the film got wrong is contrasting science and language. Science is a language. Science is a way to explain the phenomena around you in formulas that can be shared and duplicated with others i.e., a language. They are not adversarial, but the same.

One thing that surprised me greatly was the portrayal of the military. I think this is probably the truest representation of how military personnel would react. These aren't mindless soldiers. They are thinking human beings with human emotions thrust into a situation of unbelievable significance. Some handle it with fear and trepidation while others approach it with care and concern.
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Format: Blu-ray
Arrival (not to be confused with 1996's The Arrival) is a haunting, beautiful and cerebral science fiction film with a strong emotional core. The film follows linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) when she is called in US Army Colonel Weber (Forrest Whittaker) to attempt to learn the motivations of an alien race that has landed 12 large craft in seemingly unconnected locations around the world. She is paired up with physicist Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner), and together, they lead the American research team as they try to communicate with the alien visitors. As they start to decipher the aliens' language, panic begins to spread around the globe as the question "why are they here?" looms large. With international tensions mounting, fear gives way to the threat of violence, and discovering the motives of the aliens is the only way to save humanity from its own worst instincts.

Arrival would most readily be categorized as "hard sci-fi," in that it presents a more science-focused view than outright fantastical space wizardry, but surprisingly, the film centers on language, communication and free will-- fields that are sometimes dismissed as "soft sciences." It's not an action film by any means; while there is a lot of suspense and rising tension (and even an explosion!) the film is paced more like the tremendous film Moon or the haunting Ex Machina than Independence Day. The only disappointing reviews I have read tend to find this a flaw in the film ("nothing happens" being a common complaint). I won't dismiss those reviewers as "not getting it," but instead simply say if you're looking for action sci-fi, Arrival will frustrate you with its pacing and tone.

The film is beautiful, start to finish.
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Format: DVD
[No plot spoilers here.] Arrival is about how concepts of identity and timescale influence our relationships, and suggests those concepts are more flexible than we realize. "Contact with aliens," however, is the vastly more interesting way that Denis Villeneuve's film approaches that theme, weighing in as respectably on the "sci" side of the scale as it does on the "fi" side. It is not only intelligent and informed, but brilliantly scripted and acted, beautifully shot, and very, very cleverly edited. Arrival's closest cinematic kin might be Contact (contemplating social implications of extraterrestrial communication), Close Encounters (extraterrestrial contact as a vehicle for overcoming human limitations), and 2001 (subtle dramatic themes conveyed through powerful sci fi cinematography).

As with each of those films, Arrival's critics have struggled with some superficial symbols of the alien genre -- and the absence of others, like a male lead -- while missing the potent earthly themes layered beneath. Some viewers want alien invasions to be Hollywood-consistent: spaceships menacing from the sky, civil disturbances, undermatched military reactions, "Klaatu barada nikto" and all that. But Villeneuve turns those tropes upside down in order to give our struggles with symbolic superficialities the central role instead, prodding viewers to spot the irony of that by the time the story ends... Or let's just say, by the time the credits roll.

And no, not everyone will get that at first -- but that's exactly the point of a film about a message that is not for everyone, at first.
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