Hill Climb Racing 2 Industrial Deals HPC Oprah's Book Club Red Shoes We Love nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Stream your favorites. Amazon music Unlimited. Learn more. All-New Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Gift Shop Home and Garden Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon victoriaS2 victoriaS2 victoriaS2  Three new members of the Echo family Fire 7, starting at $49.99 Kindle Paperwhite GNO Shop now TG18_gno

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
53
Arrow to the Sun: A Pueblo Indian Tale
Format: Hardcover|Change
Price:$14.39+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on March 13, 2014
This book listed as a book to be read for a unit study I picked up for free in our homeschooling group's Mom's Night Out, from another homeschool parent. The unit study was on four books, which we checked out of the library at first; then later ordered for our home library. We used some of the unit study with our daughter for the Kindergarten year, but not the entire unit study. It was on American Indian culture. She fell in love with this book at age 5, and still lists it as one of her favorites at age 7. I think this is partially because of the meaning in the book for her. She says she likes the way the people in it are depicted, and the colorful pictures. She says its meaning is that love can be a challenge.

I would likely never have picked this book off the shelf in the library myself. Although I like native American stories, I tend to go for the pretty pictures (Legend of the Blue Bonnet) in a children's book, not the bold colored, angular art. The boy feels estranged from his community because he does not know who his father is, then finds out that the sun is his father, through going through trials. The trials involve Kivas, or the ritual rooms found in Pueblo structures. In the end he is a part of his community. It IS a nice story.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on December 3, 2016
Still one of my all time favorite picture books. I feel in love with it as a child and it still captures the attention of my students in the library. Colorful illustrations and a good story. A strong Caldecott Medal winner.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on June 16, 2003
My mother read this book to me when I was a child, and I remember loving it, but hadn't seen it in probably 15 years until I bought it for my nephew. It is as good as I remember.
I can attest to the fact that the high contrast, brightly colored drawings are mesmerizing for a small child. The best part of the book is when the boy must complete four tasks for the sun god to prove himself. The tasks are not narrated, you get to see how the tasks are completed from how the drawings change. It's so cool! I felt very smart as a little kid being able to discover what he did and figure it our for myself.
On a cultural note, the narrative is similar to the Christ story. Mother gives birth to the boy (a virgin birth) after the sun god sends a ray of energy to her. The boy grows up and wants to know who his father is, and goes on a quest to find him and prove that he is indeed the son of the sun god. (That's why he becomes an arrow to the sun!)
I think it's good for a child to be exposed to this story to begin to understand the universal elements of religion and that all cultures have a lot in common. Even those that seem strange are not so different from our own.
0Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on September 7, 2017
i remember reading this book when i was younger and hearing about it on reading rainbow. so i bought this for my girl Kendra; about a boy who goes through trials to "prove" his self worth and it's done through an indian themed story i believe. the pictures are colorful and fun to look at...hehehe it's a jpeg style drawing which i like.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on September 25, 2008
I just recently found this again as an adult to share to my son. I remember the teachers back when I was about eight or a little younger showing us a movie version of this book. I found it mesmerizing. While it doesn't portray the culture that the book is based on absolutely correctly, it is a child's book and being so, sometimes things are changed to make it easier for them to understand. Also it is the writers interpretation of the myth. That being said, the book teaches children how to be heroic in their own respect and that sometimes the needs of the one, is outweighed by the needs of many.

The storybook itself has amazing art work and helps keep a child engaged as the journey goes on. I love this book and I hope you will too.

Buy this for a good read to your littlest ones.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on July 28, 2017
Beautifully illustrated book. My daughter just loves the pictures and gets giddy when we read together.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on February 10, 2018
I bought for my grandson as a request from my son since it was one of his childhood favorites. Loved by all
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on January 18, 2018
One of my favorite books from gradeschool. Had to have it!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on February 29, 2016
My grandson loves these "trickster-type books.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on August 23, 2014
I agree that this is not at all a realistic Native tale. But when I was a child the bold pictures in this book made such a deep impression on me, I can't help but love it.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse