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The Art of Debt-Free Living Paperback – May 26, 2005

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Pleasant Word-A Division of WinePress Publishing (May 26, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414103468
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414103464
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,272,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Deborah Nayrocker has lived the art of debt-free living, and her experience shows in her practical advice and suggestions. Her positive spirit throughout the book encourages the reader to succeed in changing his or her financial status. She admits that the change will not be easy or overnight, but once financial freedom is gained, it is worth the effort. With the mantra of "spend less than you earn," Nayrocker asks her readers to do a financial self-examination to discover where money is spent, to determine financial goals, and to organize priorities and spending objectives. After this, she describes step-by-step how to begin a "positive cash flow" and maintain a financial plan. Without a plan, many people are prone to kamikaze spending, thus landing themselves in more debt than they can manage. To help create a plan, several fill-in charts are provided to assist with goal-setting, defining monthly income and expenses, repaying debt, and other financial matters. Budgeting is emphasized along with starting savings accounts to prepare for expected and unexpected expenses. Overall, this book is an excellent guide to managing money and becoming debt-free. While those who have large debts such as credit cards, loans, or mortgages are the target audience, this book is even appropriate as a debt-prevention tool for those striking out into the financial world, such as college students.
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Format: Paperback
The Art of Debt-Free Living: Living Large on Less Than You Earn is a no-nonsense guide to getting out of debt and staying that way. Written by a freelance writer and small business owner, The Art of Debt-Free Living covers sensible lifestyle changes, practical basic investment strategies that avoid excess risk, helpful credit card tips, how to keep personal problems from generating too much debt, and more. Divided into page-size vignettes and personal testimonies, The Art of Debt-Free Living breaks down practical advice into simple, quickly grasped concepts and is an ideal introduction to good money habits especially for teenagers, first-time homeowners, newly married couples and others growing accustomed to the responsibility paying their own bills.
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