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Art, Emotion and Ethics 1st Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0199263219
ISBN-10: 0199263213
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"There is much here to admire. Amon the strengths of the work are the clarity and sophistication of Gaut's arguments.... I consider this an important book that deserves to be widely read and discussed."--Daniel Jacobson, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews


About the Author


Berys Gaut is Reader in Philosophy at the University of St. Andrews.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press; 1 edition (July 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199263213
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199263219
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 0.9 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,996,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Art, Emotion and Ethics is a nice condensed work. In it, Berys Gaut defends what he calls Ethicism. "Ethicism holds that [an artistic] work is aesthetically flawed in so far as it possesses an aesthetically relevant ethical flaw and aesthetically meritorious in so far as it possesses an aesthetically relevant ethical merit. The ethical flaws referred to are intrinsic ethical flaws, not the ethically bad effects that works may have on actual audiences. Intrinsic ethical flaws are ethical flaws in the attitudes that works manifest towards their subjects. So ethicism holds that works are aesthetically flawed in so far as they exhibit aesthetically relevant ethical flaws in their manifested attitudes." (229)

Gaut contrasts this view with what he takes to be the only plausible competing views, atuonomism and contextualism. Typically, the debate is set up as one between moralists, immoralists and autonomists, but Gaut thinks these labels are misleading.

Ethicism is the monotonic positive relation. All works are aesthetically flawed in so far as they contain an ethical demerit that is aesthetically relevant and all works have aesthetic merit in so far as they contain an aesthetically relevant moral merit. This is the "full-blooded" version. A weaker version can hold that a work is always aesthetically flawed in so far as it has some aesthetically relevant ethical flaw, but a work does not always have aesthetic merit in so far as it has an aesthetically relevant ethical merit.

The extreme immoralist position is that an artwork is always aesthetically flawed in so far as it contains some aesthetically relevant ethical merit and always has an aesthetic merit in so far as it contains an aesthetically relevant ethical flaw.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Exactly what I wanted. I buy books for instructors who forgot to order on time or ones that are out of print.
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