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Art of Preserving Paperback – September 1, 2003

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (September 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898158958
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898158953
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
When the book arrived I had been puréeing apricots for smoothies (even freezing some) to cope with the ample apricot crop. We had already dried three batches in our new electric dehydrator. What else could we do? Looking in the Art of Preserving, I found two choices: Apricot and Cardamom Chutney and Fresh Apricot Jam. With our pantry almost out of apricot jam, I decided to go with the jam instead of chutney. Immediately, I noticed that the recipe called for twice as much sugar as I normally use. My basic proportion is one cup of sugar to one pound of fruit. Depending on the sweetness of the fruit and personal taste, one can always add more sugar and correct with lemon juice to get the right balance. On the other hand, I liked the idea of using cardamom with apricots. I had made a quince-cardamom marmalade last fall and decided to make apricot-cardamom jam, beginning with only one-half of the prescribed sugar. The results were remarkable even with less sugar.
As I looked at other recipes, I found the amount of sugar most of the time more in line with my personal taste. One other exception was Strawberry Jam although the addition of the juice and zest of three oranges was a nice touch. In the same way, many other familiar-sounding recipes contain a unique ingredient that sets them apart from the ordinary. For example, whiskey in Orange Marmalade, ginger in Grapefruit Jam, cardamom in Preserved Lemons, cayenne pepper in Gooseberry Chutney, sunflower seeds in Apricot and Cardamom Chutney, golden raisins in Plum Sauce, toasted walnuts in Apple Chutney, ripe tomatoes in Pear Chutney and nutmeg in Pickled Asparagus.
The author, Jan Berry, grew up in the Australian outback, learning to cook from a mother who, in keeping with her outback lifestyle, was of necessity resourceful.
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Format: Paperback
I love this book! It is a must-have for anyone whose collection of cookbooks numbers more than ten. This is the book for you if you have been canning and preserving for a while and have started to feel either bored or limited. This book, with its intriguing and beautiful photographs, will give you new ideas. The combinations are unusual and mouth watering. I read and reread this book whenever I am feeling like trying something new and exciting.
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Format: Paperback
For years now I have been waiting for a cookbook full of preserves- not your typical strawberry jam and apple butter type, however. I have enjoyed giving unusual preserves, jams and jellies to friends as gifts, but finding the recipes for this exotica was difficult. This cookbook, however, finally provides me with well-written recipes and beautiful pictures. My only complaint is that this book only now came out. As a collector of a few hundred cookbooks, this is a star in my collection!
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Format: Paperback
Some folks have noted that they had trouble with the recipes in this book. I have made jams for 25 years and I found these recipes delightful. As for the USDA, how can you trust an organization that thinks BPA is not harmful, bio-engineered crops are fine, and bovine growth hormone should be in milk? By all means, read the recipes carefully, compare ingredient amounts with other cookbooks and use your common sense. My six oranges might not be anywhere near the size of Jan Berry's 6 oranges. As a rule of thumb, after you have the ingredients partially cooked, measure. Adjust sugar to 1/4-1/2 c. per cup of fruit. I have just completed the most gorgeous blood orange marmalade. I used mason jars with Leifheit lids (BPA Free!) and I hot water bath canned them for 10 minutes (I'm at sea level). I have the melon marmalade on the stove now. I did not warm the sugar, because I'm adding Pomona's pectin. (1/2 t. per C. of fruit). I froze the melon in summer to use with the blood oranges now taking over the kitchen. My experience with frozen fruit is that it may not set up, even with the natural pectin in citrus, hence the Pomona's. This book has some great unusual combos. Making marmalade? Buy a Zyliss zester; it will change your life.
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Format: Hardcover
At some point after you've sealed your umpteenth jar of strawberry preserves and peach jam, you find yourself asking, Is this as exciting as it gets? Really, your sister and office mates are probably (secretly of course) just as bored with your yearly batches of apple jelly as you are. To keep motivated every harvest time, you repeat to yourself over and over, like a mantra: Made with real sugar, not high fructose corn syrup...

Well imagine their eyes popping out of their heads when you triumphantly hand them your Pear and Ginger Marmalade, Green Tomato Relish, and Plum and Raisin Chutney!
When the title of a cookbook claims the status of Art, expect that it contains inventive, quirky and elegant combinations in addition to the more pedestrian basics. Also, assume that it was not meant for rank beginners any more than it was written by a rank beginner. Jan Berry, the author of Art of Preserving has decades of experience with preserving a wide range of fruits and vegetables, and while she discusses the basic methods in a short preface chapter, it's barely sketched. But more on that in a moment.

In the ten years that I have owned my copy of Art of Preserving, I have tried perhaps a dozen of the 300 or so recipes in this book. It's all I have the nerve, resources or the gourmet gumption, to have tried. From this book I have produced Blood Orange Pommander Brandy, Orange Wine, Lemon Oil, Candied Citrus peel, Blueberry Jam, Apple and Geranium Jelly, Figs in Brandy, Red Bell Pepper Jelly, herb-infused vinegars and sugars, Preserved Ginger, and Banana Jam. I am eager to try several more as time and ingredient availability permit, such as Pumpkin and Rosemary Jam and Melon Jelly.
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