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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
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Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars (Men-at-Arms) Paperback – March 26, 1984

4.2 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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$17.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
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Frequently Bought Together

  • Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars (Men-at-Arms)
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  • Saxon, Viking and Norman (Men at Arms Series, 85)
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  • Anglo-Saxon Thegn AD 449-1066 (Warrior)
Total price: $43.24
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Packed with specially commissioned artwork, maps and diagrams, the Men-at-Arms series is an unrivalled illustrated reference on the history, organisation, uniforms and equipment of the world's military forces, past and present.

From the Back Cover

The Arthurian Age-the Celtic Twilight-the Dark Ages-the Birth of England: these are the powerfully romantic names often given to one of the most confused yet vital periods in British history.
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Product Details

  • Series: Men-at-Arms (Book 154)
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing; 1984 no other dates edition (March 26, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0850455480
  • ISBN-13: 978-0850455489
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 0.1 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #385,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. Angus Macdonald on July 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
Assuming that King Arthur actually existed in some form, which is still at best a problematic assumption, this book goes well outside any particular era he would have lived through; if nothing else there is a vast amount of information on the Anglo-Saxons in here, the people he supposedly fought against. Still and all, the book does a fine job on illuminating one of the darker eras of European history.
David Nicolle does his best, as always, at reading between the lines of chronicles, art, and many works that were written well after the fact to try and peice together informaion on this broad time period. His notes on weapons, armour, and tactics are very solid, not too far out on speculation, yet not so conservative to stifle any real potentiallities. "Arthur" himself makes only a fleeting appearance in these pages, which is appropriate.
Angus McBride (absolutely no relation) does his usual magnificent job of illustrating the warriors of the era. Not only does he show a fine sense of detail, but the paintings are characters, not merely "soldiers on parade" -- each of them is a unique individual and looks at home and quite comfortable (as well as one can be) in the armour worn.
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Format: Paperback
I love Osprey Military books, so of course I will give this one a favorable review. The folks at Osprey understand the truth in the cliche that "a picture is worth a thousand words." It is a terribly frustrating experience to try to follow a book which is almost all text trying to convey ideas to you which really require some sort of visual representation, be it a photo, drawing, map, graph, or whatever; it is equally awful to try to make sense of a book which is almost entirely made up of illustrations and doesn't provide anywhere near adequate text to explain them. One thing I like about Osprey books is that they have a good ballance of text and illustrations which allows them to get information across to the reader in an efficient and entertaining manner. The title of this one is slightly misleading; only part of the book is spent on the Arthurian period, and the book as a whole runs all the way through the Viking period and up to the Norman Conquest. Some of the dates in the chronology section could stand to be corrected, but there is so much uncertainty in the Arhurian era, so debate is inevitable. Like other Osprey books, there are many informative illustrations and maps, and there are beautiful color plates. There is at least one major error, I think, in Nicolle's interpretation of the evidence, however: the Aberlemno Stone, a Pictish relief sculpture, shows what is clearly a battle; Nicolle interprets all that is depicted on it as typical Pict war gear, but Dan and Susannah Shadrake in _Barbarian Warriors_ point out that this stone portrays a Pictish victory over the Northumbrians, and it seems that the knights depicted as unarmored are on the Pictish side, while those with helmets are the Angles. Despite this, most of the information appears to be top-notch, drawing as much from archaeological evidence as from writen and artistic evidence. I highly recommend this book, and Osprey books in general.
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Format: Paperback
This is one of the older ones of the Men-at-Arms series and was first published in 1984. Rather than being entirely focused on Arthur and the Anglo-Saxons, as I had expected when I bought it years ago, it is in fact a relatively short (40 pages only) overview of the whole period going from the end of Roman Britain to Normans. Because of this, it is rather high level and succinct. Some might even find it somewhat superficial, although it does show the main evolutions and helps to put things in perspective.

The book has also become somewhat dated, particularly with regards to the sections on post-Roman Britain and the Early Anglo-Saxons, where more recent archeological finds have tended to modify historians perspectives. It also has some flaws and imprecisions, for instance in the chronology which mentions that the last Roman regular troops were withdrawn in 407, which is somewhat unlikely. Another simplification is the dating of the "traditional death of Arthur", supposed to be in AD 537 where, essentially, we simply do not know for certain and some historians even dispute whether this legendary character ever existed. By and large, however, this is a relatively good, even if high level, introduction into the so-called "Dark Ages".

The main merit of this book nowadays lies probably with its plates from Angus McBride which are simply excellent and would be particularly useful for a wargamer wanting to paint his/her figurines, for instance. My favorites were the Late Roman and Romano-British ones, but the others are also very good.
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Format: Paperback
This book is, so far, my favourite made by the "team" David Nicolle and Angus McBride; complementing a great and concise text by David Nicolle is some of the best artwork made by Angus McBride.
The text is divided in the following parts: introduction, chronology, the Arthurian age, Saxon and Celt, Britain and the Vikings.
The text provides a brief but very good introduction to the subject (Britain from the end of Roman dominion to the battle of Hastings) and is complemented by a fairly good bibliography (for further reading on the subject); perhaps this bibliography could be updated by the publishers or author (online?) as the book was published 20 years ago.
As I am an amateur illustrator I will take a little more space talking about the colour plates.
Honestly I can say that all of them are great!
When I got the book and was looking at the colour plates, every new one astonished me; the details, the composition and the atmosphere are superb in all of the illustration.
Next I will talk about each plate and present some of the best aspects of each one.
Read more ›
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