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on July 31, 2017
the new book ''john taylor gatto" "THE UNDER GROUND HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION" has a list of books and I found this one "Asylums: ESSAYS" how it ties to EDUCATION
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on September 30, 2003
I'm not a sociologist, a student of sociology or really, even that interested in sociology. I read about this book in David Orland's, Prisons: Houses of Darkness, where Orland often referred to Goffman's work in this book. I was not disappointed.
Goffman uses a mixture of field observation and references to literature to describe and critisize the theory and practice of the "Total Institution". As the reviewers note below, a "total institution" is an elastic concept. Goffman focuses on "strong" examples of T.I.'s: the mental hospital, prison, a 19th century man of war, monastery. Through these "strong" examples he fairly describes the concept and applies it well.
Less clear is the implications of Goffman's concept to those institutions which are either "weak" total institutions or non-total institutions with total institution tendencies. After reading this book, I saw aspects of "total" institutions in almost every institution I cared to think about: schools, churches, courts, etc.
I think it is fair to say that "All institutions dream of being total institutions." Therefore, this book has application beyond the world of "strong" total institutions. I recommend it highly.
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on May 7, 2014
This book can be challenging at times..You cant just read and put it down and expect to pick it back up again and know exactly what's going on. Goffman takes a very in depth look on the inmate situation focusing primarily on mental institutions. The personal stories of what these people go through and the things that Goffman witness while observing inmates really brings this book together. I think he focuses a lot on the development of the self when taken out of a familiar setting and placed into a new one. He talks about how to cope and what the staff does to help the inmates adapt to their new life. He can get wordy and redundant but all in all I think it is a rather good read. If you're in a social theory class or mental health student, I would recommend this book.
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on May 17, 2017
Very nice historical review
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on October 19, 2016
great book and came in great condition
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on February 18, 2015
Love Goffman's work. His work here was informative as the study of inmate/mental patients was not done yet.
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on May 10, 2014
Excellent condition , The concepts are as true today as when the book was first written,a must for any student studying the social sciences.
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on October 12, 2012
A must have for the young sociologist to understand how our society works as a group and how that trickles down to affect the behavior of the individual in the group. If you are a thinking person with sociological questions, this is part of the Cannon of social science.
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on November 7, 2016
Enter the past and present of the darkest side of psychology. An aim to help and the negative side effects of an industry that thrives only on capitalism and ignoring those who need our help.
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on May 1, 2016
I liked the book, I had a hard time with it holding my attention.
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