Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

At Home on the Street: People, Poverty, and a Hidden Culture of Homelessness

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1588267016
ISBN-10: 1588267016
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $2.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Rent On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$12.00 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$19.68 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
26 New from $14.57 26 Used from $12.50
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Wall Street Journal
Enjoy digital membership. $12 for 12 weeks. Learn more
$19.68 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • At Home on the Street: People, Poverty, and a Hidden Culture of Homelessness
  • +
  • Left Out in America: The State of Homelessness in the United States
  • +
  • Hobos, Hustlers, and Backsliders: Homeless in San Francisco
Total price: $56.27
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

A revelation.... Wasserman and Clair offer a new way of looking at the diverse people living on the extreme margins of our society. Their rich ethnography confronts popular conceptions of homeless people and situates street homelessness as a choice distinct from living in shelters. Sociologists, service providers, and policymakers - not to mention students of homelessness and poverty - need to read this. --Michael Rowe, Yale University

The author's expansive data is firmly grounded in the literature and theory of homelessness, making this an exceptionally strong, interesting, and well-rounded study. --Timothy Pippert, Augsburg College

About the Author

Jason Adam Wasserman is assistant professor of sociology at Texas Tech University. Jeffrey Michael Clair is associate professor of sociology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Lynne Rienner Publishers (November 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1588267016
  • ISBN-13: 978-1588267016
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #811,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is well-written with an excellent literature review, and compelling, reflective ethnographic work. It provides a very different insight into the experience of being homeless, and demonstrates how many of the policies cannot possibly work to end homelessness. The model of 'shelterization' shows how homeless must buy into a medical pathology framework in order to receive help. Further, the shelters are very unpleasant, so that even though the street is rough, at least it has fewer threats.
Its weakness, as a qualitative piece, is that it covers basically one small group of AFrican-American men in Birmingham Alabama so how well it covers other homeless groups is not clear. I'd already read Rossi's classic but this made me realize that (a) I had much more to learn and (b) Rossi's quantitative piece was also flawed by selectivity. It's tough studying the homeless, but it's tougher to be homeless.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A masterpiece: Insightful, brilliant and allows the laymen to see the HONEST predicament of America's Homeless population. Thank God for the authors. They took the time to study and then write a book that doesn't preach, it informs, it enlightens. Tom Murray in West Texas.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is not only the best book on homelessness I have found, it is a highly creative and reflective piece of postmodern sociology.

Clair and Wasserman’s highly original ethnography on the “street homeless”--defined as those who generally shirk shelters and homeless services for de-institutionalized life on the streets--goes beyond explaining homelessness to an examination of the deep ironies in our culture that both produce homelessness and criminalize the very phenomenon for which they are responsible.

The authors’ core critique is that mainstream homelessness discussions become reductionistic when locating all under the same generic, individualized causes of addiction and mental illness. Their analysis is grounded in homeless people’s self-understanding and from there moves outward into critique of official definitions, causes, services and policies.

Which way does cause and effect flow? Is homelessness caused by mental health issues or do mental health issues emerge through homelessness? Does alcoholism result in homelessness or does the boredom and depression of being homeless lead one to drink? Furthermore, do the homeless really drink more than the rest of us or are they simply perceived as such due to their constant relegation to public places? Are people homeless because they are lazy or because a capitalist economy based on unchecked competition for limited resources naturally disenfranchises a portion of the population?

These lines of inquiry allows the authors to provide a highly successful upending of homelessness orthodoxy.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book seemed to take on a monotonous bias quickly and without letting go. The writers obviously developed heartfelt friendships and sympathies with their subjects and then seemed to write a whole book about homeless people as victims and society as villains. At first, these feelings struck a chord with me, but then they just took over the book. Different topics were discussed in very scientific and academic language, but I felt that the bias became too much for me and decreased the insightfulness and general usefulness of the book. I also felt that life on the streets was not described in nearly as much detail as I had hoped from researchers who spent time living amongst their subjects. That was a primary reason that I bought this particular book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

At Home on the Street: People, Poverty, and a Hidden Culture of Homelessness
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: At Home on the Street: People, Poverty, and a Hidden Culture of Homelessness