& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by Media Supplies Outlet and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
At the Jazz Band Ball: Vo... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by jukeboxonline
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: excellent condition cd and complete artwork, IN STOCK RIGHT NOW,
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

At the Jazz Band Ball: Vol. 2

4.4 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, September 7, 1990
$16.89
$7.54 $0.19

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
$16.89 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Media Supplies Outlet and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • At the Jazz Band Ball: Vol. 2
  • +
  • Bix Beiderbecke, Volume I: Singin' The Blues
  • +
  • Birth Of The Hot - The Classic Chicago "Red Hot Peppers" Sessions 1926-27
Total price: $26.87
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Working as a featured soloist with Paul Whiteman's orchestra, cornetist Bix Beiderbecke still found opportunities to play in small jazz groups, where his creativity could range freely. This music comes from a six-month period between October 1927 and April 1928 and spotlights sessions led by both Bix and his frequent musical partner, saxophonist Frank Trumbauer. The earliest session features the Chicago Loopers, with Beiderbecke and Trumbauer heard to best advantage on the two takes of "Three Blind Mice." Six tunes by Bix Beiderbecke and his Gang represent the musical highpoint here, with Beiderbecke creating spontaneous lines that have the mark of great composition. He's in good company, as well, with frequent outbursts from Adrian Rollini on bass saxophone, an unlikely soloist but one who played his unwieldy instrument with enthusiasm and precision. There are also several tracks recorded under Trumbauer's name, some of which tend to the sentimental popular music of the day. But the music leaps to life whenever Beiderbecke's cornet, Trumbauer's saxophone, or Joe Venuti's violin comes to the fore. On "Cryin' All Day," one of the Trumbauer band's more spirited jazz numbers, Bix is adding fresh details to the out-chorus that still have the capacity to surprise. --Stuart Broomer
  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
1
30
2:50
Play in Library $0.69
 
2
30
2:49
Play in Library $0.69
 
3
30
2:55
Play in Library $0.69
 
4
30
3:02
Play in Library $0.99
 
5
30
3:09
Play in Library $0.69
 
6
30
3:09
Play in Library $0.99
 
7
30
2:49
Play in Library $0.99
 
8
30
3:00
Play in Library $0.99
 
9
30
3:01
Play in Library $0.99
 
10
30
3:15
Play in Library $0.99
 
11
30
2:53
Play in Library $0.99
 
12
30
3:01
Play in Library $0.99
 
13
30
3:00
Play in Library $0.69
 
14
30
3:02
Play in Library $0.99
 
15
30
3:07
Play in Library $0.99
 
16
30
2:52
Play in Library $0.69
 
17
30
3:14
Play in Library $0.99
 
18
30
3:06
Play in Library $0.99
 
19
30
2:47
Play in Library $0.69
 
20
30
2:49
Play in Library $0.69
 
21
30
2:57
Play in Library $0.99
 
22
30
3:02
Play in Library $0.99
 
23
30
2:55
Play in Library $0.99
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 7, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B00000274K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #413,192 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Bix Beiderbecke Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I have been a big Bix fan for many years, and was delighted when I purchased this CD. Bix, in my opinion, was the best jazz cornetist of all time, and ranks as my favorite jazz musician. The tone he was able to achieve on his cornet just floors me every time I listen to his records. This collection does a good job of bringing together some of his best recordings along with his rarest, and several tracks he might not even have played on! (I think most have agreed that Bix was NOT on the Lou Raderman sides). I would easily give this disc 5 stars if it weren't for the dull, lifeless remastering, which really dampens the sound and sucks the tone right out of Bix's cornet. I have a Parlophone re-issue 78rpm of "At The Jazz Band Ball" and even with a little surface noise, the clarity and brilliance is far beyond the remastered track on this disc. If you really like Bix, save your money and invest in the "Bix Restored" series which features excellent transfers by John R. T. Davies. If you only want one or two Bix discs, this is a good one to get. The discography is very good and the notes are o.k. Of course, the music is beyond compare, and the only thing that would improve this disc would be better transfers/remastering.
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Let me first say this... if you want to listen to Bix Beiderbecke's short stint with the Frankie Trumbauer Orchestra on CD, you have two choices: the JSP box set, and two Columbia CD's from the early '90s (this, and Volume 1) . The JSP set does give you more tracks, but all the essential tracks are available on the Columbia set too. A number of the tracks in the JSP set don't even have Bix on them.

So which option wins out? I own both sets, and have compared extensively. Risking the anger of the John R.T. Davies fans, i'll have to give the nod to the Columbia discs. Read on for the differences you will hear (if you want to hear them).

The JSP set. This was re-mastered from very clean 78s by one of the best musical restorers of the last 30 years. There is a nice heft to the music, with strong bass present. Dynamic range is pretty good, but a little lacking in the upper register. You can especially notice when someone takes a solo, it sounds like you have your hands slightly covering your ears, and loses some of that upper-end definition. Still, this definitely sounds better than one might think for very early electrical (microphone) recording.

The Columbia set. This was re-mastered from the original metal and glass parts from the Columbia vaults. While there is a bit less heft, and could use a hair more bass, this definitely offers the music cleaner and more transparent. You can really hear every solo very smoothly and cleanly. It's more transparent and crisp than the JSP set.

So, both sets have their ups and downs. The problem with the JSP set is that no matter how talented the late John RT Davies was, he could only do so much, as he didn't have access to the original masters. He had to use consumer-level 78's.
Read more ›
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you recognize the name "Bix Beiderbecke", then you know what this is, and you probably already own the music. Otherwise, you should get this and be introduced to one of the great jazz musicians of the '20s. Bix played the cornet, and he is a joy to listen to, along with King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, or Red Nichols.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is a surprisingly good, not great, selection from the first interesting break-off from Black Mainstream jazz, i.e. not in the tradition, at least not clearly, of King Oliver, Louis Armstrong/Sidney Bechet.

Plus: no Paul Whiteman Orchestra selections. PW was the most tiresome musician still worth listening to in jazz history. Worth it, but rather like work. Approach it as such. Instead, we get the Frankie Trumbauer ensemble, a small ensemble that was to some degree a cut-out of the PWO, but much more interesting. Trumbauer was himself a very interesting soloist (on C-melody sax, which was becoming out-moded), and it's notorious that Lester Young was strongly influenced by him, though people argue in exactly what ways. Bix & Tram (as he was called) were very interesting together; Bix was a mere inserted relief in Whiteman records.

An even bigger plus: there is a small selection of pieces from Bix & his Gang, a small ensemble, small enough for Bix to be audible, even when he's part of a cooler, more swinging polyphony. These pieces are a direct connective between the earliest days of recorded jazz and a much deeper sensibility. Listen to "At the jazz band ball" and compare it to the monkey-jiggle of the same composition in its 1917 recording with the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. Jazz going way beyond the "stunt" that Duke Ellington remembered jazz being, back in the beginning.

Because of the inclusion of the "Bix & his gang" records, I'd recommend this second volume of the two Columbia (i.e. Sony) discs. Both are good.

***Big minus: Heavy first or second generation noise reduction, like looking at curios under plate glass in a dusty hardware store. Try the Bix & Tram set from JSP (British), if you can get it. An excellent four-disc set. But the Columbia CD's are by no means the worst examples of noise reduction I've encountered.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums




Look for Similar Items by Category