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Atlas

4.0 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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Audio CD, December 2, 2003
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Kinky ~ Atlas

Amazon.com

This daring quintet broke from Monterrey, Mexico on the scene in 2002 with their self-described "electro-Latin organic fusion" and turned a lot of heads at the 2002 SXSW festival in Austin, Texas. The aptly named group continues their worldbeat party mix of funk, rock, electronica, trance, psychedelic pop, dance and more on their sophomore album. Choice cuts include "Airport Feelings," with its instantly infectious vibe and the trip-hop flavored "My God is So Quiet" which would fit in nicely in industrial/house dance clubs. With its start-stop dynamics, tempo shifts, and spirited jams, the 12-track album has a definite "live" feel. The only instrumental, "Do U Like It," is an intense rock-jazz workout that bounces leads between percussions, guitars and keyboards. But Kinky can also slow the party down, such as on the reflective tunes like "Minotauro" and "Semillas de Menta," whose hooky melodies and echoey vocal harmonies evoke nostalgic chamber-pop brilliance. --Ramiro Burr
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 2, 2003)
  • Original Release Date: 2003
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Nettwerk Records
  • ASIN: B0000E6XGR
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #127,422 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I waited over a month before writing this review. The main reason being, Atlas is so different from the first Kinky album that, on first impression, it may seem a completely different group, and will not meet any pre-conceptions you may have of Kinky. It requires repeated listening. Those electronic music fans (many of kinky fans indeed) may find the change too drastic, and I believe some reviews of the album reflect this. Nevertheless, repeated listening allows to find at the core of the songs the same roots that made the original CD so appealing: Funky bass, strong percussion rhythms, and synth loops, which continue to be innovative and used as a recourse, not as a gimmick. Accordion, horns and timbales are also used less prominently, again as part of the "multilayered" construction of the songs but without the purpose of giving a "Latin flavor" just for the sake of it. Here Kinky seems to have inverted the original idea. Electric guitars and vocals are more prominent, and bass, synthesizers and loops are used as enhancers. In Atlas lyrics are also more elaborate, both in English and Spanish. I disagree with people who claim Kinky's lyrics in English are awkward, forced or badly written. Actually, the one with the oddest, silliest lyrics in the album is co-written by Itaal Shur, collaborator with Santana on "Smooth". Perhaps if this was an American band, nobody would be judging syntax or phrasing construction. How many hit songs are out there whose lyrics barely make any sense anyway? I nevertheless agree that all the Spanish lyrics on Atlas are far more elaborated, complex and interesting, and I just wish everybody could understand Spanish, and therefore appreciate the cleverness of songs like "Minotauro" or the sensuality of "Semillas de Menta".Read more ›
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By A Customer on December 7, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The Grammy nominated quintet from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico secluded itself in the jungles of the Yucatan to write their sophomore album "Altas." After much hype of their self-titled debut which, in its wake included an appearance in the Late Show with David Letterman, national television spots with Smirnoff, Honda, and Motorola, among others, the much anticipated "Atlas" hit the record shelves December 2.
Working again with producer Chris Alison (Coldplay, The Beta Band), Kinky releases an eclectic album with a harder rock edge as a result of collaborating with engineer Thom Russo (System of a Down, Audioslave). "The approach for this album was different from the first in that on this album we wanted to focus on a live, organic band sound" says Gil Cerezo (lead vocals). In addition, "Atlas" benefits from the 180 live shows within the last year that has taken them through Europe, North and South America and results in five English tracks "Sometimes I even dream in English" Gil confesses.
"The Headphonist" features a contribution from John McCrea of Cake, whom they met while sharing the bill on a recent tour. "Presidente", the opening track and first single from "Atlas" is a political commentary questioning the Mexican government.
With "Atlas," Kinky captivates their eclectic live sound musically with their fusion of alternative electronica regional sounds. Meanwhile, they continue to cross cultural borders and destroy language barriers, leaving audiences and listeners alike, as Kinky would put it "queriendo mas y mas y mas y MAS!"
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Format: Audio CD
On first listen, Kinky are about as south-of-the-border and muy caliente as a college band from Indiana - with grinding machines and chirruping effects, they seem determined to sound as Norte Americano as possible. But this band (from Monterrey) is not in cultural denial, and its explosions of percussion, subtly picked guitar and witty pan-linguistic vocals make Atlas the most original spin on indie-pop in years. Sometimes they sound like a Mexican Talking Heads, yoking clever lyrics to pop-electro; elsewhere they're R.E.M. with an accent, or even a lilting, Latino Beatles. Joyful, sophisticated and prone to sudden bursts of vampire-movie keyboards, this really is a band unlike anything you've heard before. Lame yanqui outfits beware: They're here for your jobs.
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Format: Audio CD
I liked Kinky's last album, but I am loving Atlas. On the previous one there are a handful of good songs, but the majority of the tracks are just some cool grooves that never actually GO anywhere. This one, in contrast, has mostly solid, well-crafted songs and the beats still turn me on like crazy. I finally read some other reviews... so that WAS the singer from Cake! I thought it sounded like him. Anyway, I recommend this one whether you liked the previous release or not.
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Format: Audio CD
I never once listened to Kinkys' older material, so I lack the credible references of comparing how their newer work racks up against their newer work. I will say this, that overall I'm quite happy with this CD...I listen to Ozmalti and hell while I'm at even Mana and Molotov(So I've been exposed to some Spanish music).

Anyways, the first track "Presidente" is a sugar-coated dance track with one majorly catchy chorus. "Salta-Lenin-El-Atlas" displays the bands' more immediate Spanish culture while "Airport Feelings" tilts a fair dosage of rock meets electronica.

Sure, this isn't very advance music, nor will the 'Purist' out there find any semblance of earful listening, the music is groovy and in perspective serves its' purpose rather well. It has punch, with a hint of salsa and sure sounds nice with the subwoofer on high.
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