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Back Home Hardcover – June, 1947

4.9 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 315 pages
  • Publisher: William Sloane; 1st edition (June 1947)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0891908560
  • ISBN-13: 978-0891908562
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #439,683 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is the best book that i have read on the return of GI's to the cold war america. Bill covers every thing from segregation to gun control to house un american activities comittie stuff. with every cartoon he makes you think about the deep real issues in american society.
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Format: Hardcover
Recommend this one highly for any fan of Mauldin for here you get pure Mauldin, both his writing and his wonderfully insightful cartoons. This reader must understand that Mauldin wrote and drew from what he experienced. He drew from his times. I suppose that I am trying to say that not all will find his writings and observations "politically correct" by our standards of today. That is good though. To understand ourselves, as we are now, we must understand the thoughts and attitudes of those who came before us. In this work we get just that. Mauldin work is one of the best commentaries addressing the problems of post WWII American and the returning G.I. Recommend this one for anyone wanting a simple, good read, or anyone interested in the attitudes and thoughts of this era in our history.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When Bill Mauldin went to War he was a very young man. Five years later, he had lived through the World's greatest conflict and had documented that experience in words and pictures for the military newspaper, Stars and Stripes, with his award-winning cartoons featuring the two GI dogfaces: Willie & Joe. His book: "Up Front" was a huge commercial and critical success on all levels and he was now a man on the top in the literary world.

"Back Home" is Bill's second book, and it begins where: "Up Front" leaves off. It is June 1945 and Bill is in Naples, Italy and now his new worry is not the German Army, it is how to get enough discharge points to get himself back to the USA and released from the Army and back into the civilian world. Lot's of the cartoons featured here again star Willie & Joe, but many others do not as they are more about the political state of affairs of the time {1945-1947). Bill's political insights are the key to the story of: "Back Home." Now, as an seasoned Veteran, Bill Mauldin was ready to tackle issues such as bigots, shysters, black-marketeers, evil landlords, and the new "Red Menace" of mother Russia.

This second book by Bill is not as well known as: "Up Front", but it is as great as that book and because of the author's growth and wisdom since the end of the War, this is a more mature work in every way. Bill, is just an: "Everyday Joe" and the folks of the 1940's responded to this and they were right there for him. This book is an American history lesson. "Back Home" is one of the finest books written about post-war problems, and the early days of the Cold War, that would bleed into the 1950's and 1960's.

This book is funny, but it is message of sadness. Now we are to witness the change that occurs as soon as World War II ends.
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Format: Hardcover
To learn about any subject, it is best to go to the source. To learn about society and politics in the 1940's, an excellent source is the book Back Home, written in 1947 by Bill Mauldin. Mauldin drew cartoons about his experience in the war while he was a soldier and about life as a veteran and citizen after the war. Mauldin labels himself a progressive, a radical, and a liberal. From this viewpoint he writes in great detail about issues such as housing for veterans, the unethical behavior of veterans organizations, racism, the anti-communist government committee, world hunger, and censorship of free speech. The book is, for the most part, a long editorial about the current state of affairs in the world following World War II.

This book's greatest assets are in the multitude of examples and apt analogies that he uses to illustrate every point he makes. Examples are taken directly from the current world events and his own experiences in the war and in society. For instance, when discussing racism, he first introduces the problem of racism by illustrating that to a racist a "Negro", a Jew, or a "Jap" can never be good enough. A brave Jew is troublesome, while a timid one is cowardly. Meanwhile, a rich one is selfish and a poor one is worthless. Next he gives an example of the 34th division of Japanese-Americans that was admired by the entire army. Then they would return home and get kicked out of barbershops and restaurants as William Randolph Hearst continued referring to the Yellow Peril. Next he tells of a conversation in which an American, when hearing that only two Japanese-Americans in a certain company survived, says "Too goddam bad they didn't get the last two.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As noted in my "handle", I am a wounded combat veteran. Mauldin's work is soothing to me, much like the old movie The Best Years of Their Lives (1946). Yeah, I felt, and still feel, that what he wrote and drew pertained to my experience. "It was like that for me, too!" It helps, quite a bit, really. I needed this. It reminds me that my experience is not so unique; others have been through essentially the same, rough times - and encountered the same civilian and bureaucratic reactions. It gives me some temporal perspective, which is "grounding", stabilizing. My war was Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). When they strapped me into a stretcher, "racked" it w/ many others into a cold, dark transport aircraft, and I made the stages of triage farther and farther "back", I was spent, exhausted, prematurely-aged, and emotionally drained. Friends had died, buddies were wounded, and about a third of the unit were injured at least once.

Much appreciated!
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