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Bangkok Revenge

2012

NR
3.6 out of 5 stars (19) IMDb 4.9/10

After witnessing the brutal murder of his parents, a young boy is raised by a martial arts master who grooms him to be a lethal killer. Some 20 years later, it's time to take revenge on the assassins who destroyed his childhood.

Starring:
Jon Foo, Caroline Ducey
Runtime:
1 hour, 21 minutes

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By C. Sawin on March 26, 2013
Format: Blu-ray
In "Bangkok Revenge," a young boy witnesses his parents get shot to death by a group of masked men. He unmasks one of them and sees his face. The man shoots the boy in the temple because of it. The boy fights to survive (and struggles against logic) and somehow perseveres despite those same men attempting to finish the job. He's raised and trained by a master of Muay Thai boxing, but the trauma to his brain has removed any sign of human emotion in the boy. 20 years pass and the boy named Manit has grown into a man (played by Jon Foo). Absent of emotion, Manit is a martial arts monster and his sole objective is to plow through anyone who gets in the way of finding those that wronged him all those years ago.

A guy shoots a little boy in the head at point blank and somehow that kid doesn't die? Life support or not, the exit wound on the other side of that kid's head should be the size of a jawbreaker. The nurse caring for young Manit takes him from the hospital because bad men keep trying to kill him. She drops him off with a man in a village because he "knows the secrets of the plants." This is never explained. You see the guy working Manit's muscles while he's unconscious, but plants never enter the equation. Does he know his way around herbs? Is he going to teach Manit how to garden? Will he feed Manit Miracle-Gro so he'll grow up big and strong? These are the important questions that are never answered.

Young Manit sees a dog get hit by a car and suddenly gets inspired to train in martial arts. He trains in ankle deep water in what seems like ten years thanks to an awkward montage. Another ten years pass and Manit is now incredibly fit.
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Format: DVD
Jon Foo's a good guy among the gen-x of action films, and more than anybody else, I get the impression that he's trying hard to make the most of his career and to impress people. His first starring vehicle, Tekken, was a mixed bag nevertheless highlighted by his martial performance, and his second solo outing, "Bangkok Adrenaline" here, is very similar in this equation. However, because this one has few stars in it besides him and no franchise to back it up, I believe that it's doomed to languish facelessly on the shelves of video stores. It's no help that other viewers may well judge it more harshly than I do, because while fun, this one's far from the perfect picture.

The story: after the childhood assassination of his parents leaves him impervious to pain and emotion, a fully-grown and fully-trained Manit (Foo) finds himself on his way to avenge the deaths of his mother and father at the hands of corrupt policemen.

In the movie, Manit's emotionless state is referred to as ataraxia, and I need to voice my amazement that no action star has played a character of similar affliction, since it provides an automatic excuse to not really need to act. Foo spends most of the time when he's not fighting walking around with his hands in his pockets, which is just about all he can do with this role. However, no one else in the cast is picking up the slack: virtually all of the Thai actors demonstrate difficulty with speaking English, and immediate co-stars Caroline Ducey (Romance) and Michael Cohen (
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
The movie starts out fairly well. Good story line, good acting, UNTIL the blond American gal is introduced. She's below "B actor" level. I wouldn't put her in a grade school production. Every time another American character is introduced, the movie gets worse. It cost $3.99 to rent. Amazon charged $200 too much.
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Format: DVD
If you have seen “Tekken,” a film adaptation of video game, you may remember the name of Jon Foo, who played the hero Jin Kazama. I didn’t like the film very much, but thought his martial arts skills were impressive. Now Jon Foo is back in “Rebirth,” a French/Thai action film, as a vengeful hero with unique traits.

The story is simple. John Foo is Manit, a young deadly martial arts fighter whose parents were brutally murdered when he was only a child. Marit, who witnessed the killing, was shot in the head by the criminal, but survived miraculously. Because of the serious wound, however, Manit “has no feelings.” That is, he walks, talks and fights without any emotional reaction.

The idea is interesting, but writer/director Jean-Marc Minéo is not really interested in developing it. After all “Rebirth” (also known as “Bangkok Renaissance” or “Bangkok Revenge”) is an action movie and the film provides lots of action. Action sequences are reasonable, although more lighting and less editing would have made them better. You know Jon Foo can do action, so why don’t you let him show what he can do in one continuous take?

I didn’t mind the film’s incoherent and confusing storytelling (though the ending needs improvement). I did mind much the too fast editing that frequently undermines the action scenes. “Rebirth” is a solid low-budget action movie that could have been much better with more budget and more effective choreography.
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