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Bankstatement Import

4.0 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, 1989
$35.99
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Editorial Reviews

Track Listings 1. Throwback 2. I'll Be Waiting 3. Queen of Darkness 4. That Night 5. Raincloud 6. The Border 7. Big Man 8. A House Needs a Roof 9. The More I Hide It 10. Diamonds Aren't So Hard [*] 11. Thursday the Twelfth

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Original Release Date: 1989
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Virgin Records
  • ASIN: B00BGCQO1K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,746,339 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Rule of Marketing No. 23a: If you are not a brand name in the first place, why confuse the issue by further anonymizing your work (note that if one searches on the Amazon listing for Tony Banks it does not pull up this album, which has much to recommend it - just as Strictly Inc. does). Contrast this with Peter Gabriel's approach, which for the first three albums were named "Peter Gabriel" alone and had his face (or a semblance of it) on the covers. For further great moments in album marketing, see the movie "This Is Spinal Tap", and how it's "Smell the Glove" cover artwork was pulled back and the group ended up with "The Black Album."
But I digress. Regarding Bankstatement, the record company apparently was concerned about whether Banks' material was going to be commercial enough, so it asked TB to get a coproducer. From the list given him he chose Steve Hillage of the 70s' group "Gong", not exactly the most commercial of ventures either. Yet he and Tony seemed to work together well, and there is a certain "sheen" to the production. As in his last "formal" solo album 8 years earlier ("The Fugitive") Banks wrote mostly 4 minute pop songs, but as opposed to "The Fugitive", where he sang everything himself, he astutely decided to bring in a male and a female singer. I would characterize it as Tony's most "romantic" album, one with several love songs in lush settings ("I'll Be Waiting", "That Night") that you can listen to with a loved one without worrying about "The Return of the Giant Hogweed." Well, not so fast - two songs harken back to "old" Genesis. One is "Big Man", sung in an ominous tone by Banks, and the other is a fan favorite, the instrumental "Thursday the Twelfth." Here, Tony uses sampling techniques to craft a rather ghoulish soundscape. All in all, a solid effort, and a good place to start for those uninitiated with the work of this great, underappreciated pop/rock keyboardist.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The first time I played this I wasn't all that crazy about it, but
after the second time I listened to it, I started to notice that I
was suddenly hearing the keyboard quality that I had so loved by
Tony when doing Genesis albums. Perhaps not for all Genesis fans,
but anyone who likes beautiful melodies and, on this album, sweet vocals(even though Tony only sings on one song...)

Of all of Tony Banks' solo works, I'd say this album is absolutely
his best (I know some of you will disagree and say 'A Curious Feeling'
is his best)... but I stand by this one.
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Format: Audio CD
Tony Banks and co 'Bankstatement' album is not a progressive rock masterpiece, and I don't think it was ever assumed it would be.

But while this is a collection of 80's sytnh pop, the songwriting is very well thought out.

The first track starts, 'Throwback' and I almost laughed because of that brass arrangement which sounds just like something off a Phil Collins solo album, but at least the song is, well not quite deep, but very well written. 'I'll be waiting' is a very passionate song, probably sounds a bit like 'Lady in red' but Alistair Gordon's husky vocals give it an altogether different quality.

I could imagine that, circa 89-90 in a biker bar in America's southwest somewhere tough bikie women belting eachother over the head with fold-out chairs to the tune of 'Queen of darkness', and 'That night' is a middle-of-the-road adult love song with a much darker edge.

'Rainclouds' is a gorgeous sunny tropical song that is intended to lift your mood, while 'The border' tries to use some riffs from 'Carpet Crawlers' within an 80's prog-pop song context. Tony's vocals always carry a cynical mood that usually seems intended for his songs.

Not a huge fan of the instrumental 'Thursday the twelth' sounds as though Tony caught his finger (or perhaps another apendage) in the keyboard and was struggling for three to four minutes trying to free it, hitting the same couple of notes over and over again... 'A house needs a roof' and especially 'Diamonds aren't so hard' are actually great pop songs, but the real jewel in the crown of 'Bankstatement' is 'The More I hide it' a very passionate song about insecurity where Alistaire delivers roaring vocals.
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Format: Audio CD
As I stated in a prior review, I bought "Bankstatement" when it initially came out on cassette in 1989. I recently purchased it on CD, and, unlike the cassette, it contains a bonus track, titled "Diamonds Aren't So Hard", which features a superbly-blended combination of Alto Saxophone and Tony Banks' haunting keyboard melodies. Nearly all of the tracks on "Bankstatement" are good, except "Queen Of Darkness" and "A House Needs A Roof", both of which sound too much like an aerobics class, although "QOD" has a nice guitar/keyboard intro. Jayney Klimek's ultra-sexy, powerful vocals give these two otherwise drab tracks much needed life, while Alistair Gordon's vocals on the other tracks (Throwback, I'll Be Waiting, Raincloud, The Border, The More I Hide It and Diamonds Aren't So Hard) have a somewhat limited range, and are just average. "That Night" is a lovely, sentimental ballad that features both Gordon and Klimek sharing lead vocals. Tony Banks' vocals on "Big Man" suits that song's lyrics and music perfectly. It's just too bad that this is Tony's only vocal appearance on "Bankstatement". TB's whirlwind keyboard style is rather effective on the lone instrumental track "Thursday The Twelfth". It is Mr. Banks' chilling keyboard work on this CD that makes "Bankstatement" worth having in any Tony Banks or Genesis fan's CD library. Too bad Atlantic Records in the U.S. took this one out of print, but it is still worth paying more for the import. Better buy "Bankstatement" before Virgin decides to take it out of print.
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