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Karl Barth vs. Emil Brunner (Issues in Systematic Theology)

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
ISBN-13: 978-0820445052
ISBN-10: 0820445053
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Editorial Reviews

Review

«John W. Hart’s careful unraveling of the relationship between Barth and Brunner performs two invaluable scholarly functions. It explores the reasons for their break in careful detail, and, while doing so, gives real insight into the deep theological drives and concerns of two apparently similar, but actually very different, thinkers.» (C. E. Gunton, Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College, London)
«Barth’s 'No!' to Emil Brunner is well known, but the roots of it are little understood. It emerged from a relationship of nearly twenty years, on Brunner’s side anxious for affirmation, on Barth’s more and more wary. Brunner’s enthusiasm for Moral Rearmament proved the last straw. Mining hitherto unpublished archive material, John W. Hart provides a fascinating analysis of the relationship of these two theologians, from the war years to their final break in 1934. His study throws light on the theology of the whole period.» (Timothy Gorringe, Department of Theology, University of Exeter)

About the Author

The Author: John W. Hart received his D.Phil. in theology from the University of Oxford. He also holds degrees from Princeton Seminary, Fuller Seminary, and Princeton University. An ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), he has served churches in New Jersey and Connecticut. Currently, he is co-pastor (with his wife Rebecca) of The Presbyterian Church of Upper Montclair, New Jersey.
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Product Details

  • Series: Issues in Systematic Theology (Book 6)
  • Hardcover: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing (August 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820445053
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820445052
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,243,490 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on October 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
"John Hart's careful unraveling of the relationship between Barth and Brunner performs two invaluable scholarly functions. It explores the reasons for their break in careful detail, and, while doing so, gives real insight into the deep theological drives and concerns of two apparently similar, but actually very different, thinkers." (Colin Gunton, King's College, London)
"Barth's 'No!' to Emil Brunner is well known, but the roots of it are little understood. It emerged from a relationship of nearly twenty years, on Brunner's side anxious for affirmation, on Barth's more and more wary. Brunner's enthusiasm for Moral Rearmament proved the last straw. Mining hitherto unpublished archive material, John Hart provides a fascinating analysis of the relationship of these two theologians, from the war years to their final break in 1934. His study throws light on the theology of the whole period." (Timothy Gorringe, University of Exeter)
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