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Bartleby, The Scrivener by [Melville, Herman]
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Bartleby, The Scrivener Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Length: 33 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

''Herman Melville is one of American literature's greatest figures.'' --The Cambridge Guide to Literature in English

About the Author

HERMAN MELVILLE (1819-1891) was born in New York City. Family hardships forced him to leave school for various occupations, including shipping as a cabin boy to Liverpool in 1839--a voyage that sparked his love for the sea. A shrewd social critic and philosopher in his fiction, he is considered an outstanding writer of the sea and a great stylist who mastered both realistic narrative and a rich, rhythmical prose. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick and the posthumously published novella Billy Budd.

Product Details

  • File Size: 267 KB
  • Print Length: 33 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1466268778
  • Publisher: Waxkeep Publishing (February 3, 2013)
  • Publication Date: February 3, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BAVHC6S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #215,902 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well, I guess it's a well-written book because the critics tell me it's a well-written book. I guess it's about how bad it is to work on Wall Street, but it's about a guy who lost his will to live after he was let go by the post office. Maybe it's about how inhuman governments can be when there is an administration change? I'd rather not guess.
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By mcdonald on October 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had to read this book for college. I could not get into the book, it was hard for me to comprehend. I was able to have my kindle read it to me and it was much easier to understand.
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Format: Kindle Edition
If you can read Bartleby without suspecting, nay, more or less believing that it was written by Dickens, you can take pride in your mental discipline whilst reading. I confess that I briefly searched for Bartleby in my rumpled collection of Dickens, which of course does not include The Piazza Tales.

None of Melville's notorious South Sea elements here. This is straightforward, 19th century prose set in 19th century Wall Street with shabby, luridly eccentric antebellum characters including the narrator and his bedeviled scrivener (copyist), Bartleby.

The circumstances of this desiccated short story are curious, even eccentric, incredulous. The withered and aloof Bartleby is presented, examined and disdained, until his very dispirited isolation makes him the object of the narrator's genuine but increasingly troubled caretaking.

Bartleby's enervating and apparently desperate ennui keep him always a step removed from the narrator's efforts to supply a little humanity in his life.

The scrivener is lonely beyond understanding. He bears almost in silence the emotional poverty that ultimately kills him.

One believes that Bartleby longed, in vain, to be able to repel the Reaper with his simple and inscrutable refrain: "I would prefer not to."

I will prefer not to re-read Melville's tale on a dreary afternoon.
Read more on my blog: Barley Literate by Rick
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Format: Paperback
If you can read Bartleby without suspecting, nay, more or less believing that it was written by Dickens, you can take pride in your mental discipline whilst reading. I confess that I briefly searched for Bartleby in my rumpled collection of Dickens, which of course does not include The Piazza Tales.

None of Melville's notorious South Sea elements here. This is straightforward, 19th century prose set in 19th century Wall Street with shabby, luridly eccentric antebellum characters including the narrator and his bedeviled scrivener (copyist), Bartleby.

The circumstances of this desiccated short story are curious, even eccentric, incredulous. The withered and aloof Bartleby is presented, examined and disdained, until his very dispirited isolation makes him the object of the narrator's genuine but increasingly troubled caretaking.

Bartleby's enervating and apparently desperate ennui keep him always a step removed from the narrator's efforts to supply a little humanity in his life.

The scrivener is lonely beyond understanding. He bears almost in silence the emotional poverty that ultimately kills him.

One believes that Bartleby longed, in vain, to be able to repel the Reaper with his simple and inscrutable refrain: "I would prefer not to."

I will prefer not to re-read Melville's tale on a dreary afternoon.
Read more on my blog: Barley Literate by Rick
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The edition is a bit large for the shelf, and flimsy, but I bought it for the words inside; they get 5 stars. My kids had never read about Bartleby, and everyone should.
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