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on November 1, 2017
Everything and everybody in baseball. Ken Burns settles a lot of arguments and also starts some. This is a sure hit for all baseball fans. I would give it a 10 if allowed. Enjoy.
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on August 9, 2016
This is one of the most accurate, entertaining, and superbly nostalgic baseball documentaries to have ever been aired. Especially noteworthy is the emphasis placed on the imperative nature of the Negro American League from which Willie Mays, Buck O'Neil, and Jackie Robinson emerged into the ranks of Major League Baseball. One could read as many as one-hundred biographical books regarding baseball and still not learn as much history and personal insight as rendered by this Ken Burns documentary. The viewer will most assuredly beam with American pride while enjoying this program!
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on June 6, 2016
A very well presented history of the evolution of baseball over the past 150 years. Especially denoting the Ty Cobb era ending as the long ball era begins. Worth while for anyone that like baseball. I want to add one major point. The music track in the series is very annoying and distracting, especially if you have any kind of hearing defect which I do, I wish there was a way to eliminate the music .
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on June 9, 2016
What can be said that hasn't been said already? The definitive documentary on baseball. I watch this series every spring to add to my knowledge of the game, and refresh what I already know. If you want to better understand the game, watch this series. If you want to better understand what makes America what she is, watch this series. If you want to learn about American history, watch this series. Each Inning (episode) begins with who died and who was born during the decade, other pertinent historical events, just example of how this series is as much about history as it is about the game of baseball.
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on September 29, 2016
To clarify, I give Baseball, the original 9 innings 5 stars. The narrative, the narration, the music, the photos, the video footage. All Amazing. All nostalgic in the best ways. Made me find the child-like love of the game again.

I did not care for the updated 10th inning. It's full of selfish players and it dares defend steroids with justification using Chris Rock as a source.
Also, I found the narrator in the 10th inning a poor choice. The same voice actor was superb in The War but I thought his voice was too dramatic for baseball.
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on December 21, 2016
I am a baseball fan and played the game seriously as an amateur until I was 22 years old. this film is a great, objective history of the game and it presents great summaries of the greatest games ever played by the iconic players in the history of the game. One major disappointment is that the film is almost completely concentrated on major league teams in New York City. Even with this criticism, I highly recommend this film to anyone who has even a moderate interest in the sport of major league baseball.
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on July 11, 2017
Very good historical documentary. My only complaint is too much NY team coverage. There were some very memorable World Series that were mentioned briefly, or not at all.
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on January 18, 2017
The ONLY problem with this brilliant documentary is that Mr Burns will be obligated to add additional innings...as long as he is making films. It is of course a MUST watch for any serious fan of the game but, really should also be required viewing for anyone who wants an interesting point of view of not just the game but rather late 19th and 20th century American History seen through the lens of the game.

It is honest in its view of both the game and the country who created it, warts and all.
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on July 16, 2016
It started out great but i feel there was way too much focus on new york and too many new york commentators. There was a lot more baseball going on than what the series would have you believe. There was essentially no focus on the other teams and cities except when they happened to be playing the Yankees in the world series. It should be renamed "New York Baseball" to better describe the focus,
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on February 25, 2013
I reluctantly gave it 4 stars instead of 5. Why? For it's unrelenting focus on New York teams (and former NY teams) and the Northeast. For the first 2/3 of the show, I learned many wonderful things about the history of the game, and it's origins in and around New York. I appreciate those facts and gained new understanding of their significance. But by the time the 9th inning comes and goes, it becomes overwhelmingly apparent that Burn's is totally pre-occupied with NY and it's teams (present and past).
But then their's always the 10th inning. A chance to bring about a semblance of the balance that has swept through baseball. But again, New York, New York, with a dose of Boston thrown in, and then, nothing more. A wasted chance, a blown opportunity. .......
A prime example of his obsession with all things New York: Three players who dominated their era, Ted Williams, Stan Musial and Joe DiMaggio, in that order. Ted Williams gets his well deserved due (although it could have been longer) and Stan the Man Musial gets a whole 20 or 30 seconds of precious time; but then the mighty Dimaggio, the GOD of Baseball. Or so they would have you believe. Both Williams and Musial are clearly superior players to Dimaggio in most any category you can think of, but the press hated Williams and ignored Musial. (Only the good old Brooklyn Dodger fans came to Musial's rescue, by giving him the nickname that defines him.) But neither of them married Marilyn Monroe or was so 'good looking and interesting off the field': and so mainly on the basis of ONE baseball achievement, the hitting streak, Diammaggio is proclaimed the God of the era. That is a prime example of the emphasis on all things New York. If Dimaggio had played in St. Louis and Musial in New York, Dimaggio would only be known for the hitting streak, with little regard for anything else he accomplished. And while his accomphisments were very good, he still would be considered the third place player that he actually was to Williams and Musial.
Based on that example and many others, I'd have to say I came away more than a little disappointed with the amazing lack of balance shown. It just was not up to the standard he created with 'The Civil War'. Good but definitely not 'great'.
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