Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$2.06
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 Million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items shipped same or next working day from the UK.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Batman: The Chalice Comic – July 1, 2000

3.0 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Comic
"Please retry"
$6.49 $2.06
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Comic: 96 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (July 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 156389632X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563896323
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,485,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm finding more and more that these graphic novels are all about the package. They're founded in high concept and a fresh, different or innovative artistic vision (in this case by Vertigo-ish John Van Fleet). They sacrifice substance for flash. They are, in the words of The Bard, "Full of sound and fury, and signifying nothing."
Bruce Wayne receives a mysterious package that seems to contain the cup from which Jesus took His last supper. Lots of groups are interested in obtaining it. Batman makes a tough decision to secure it in an interesting fashion. The end.
Really. That's about it.
The story progresses at a cinematic pace. Batman battles Two-Face, and is injured in the conflict. Then we learn that Bruce Wayne has an ancestral responsibility for keeping the Holy Grail. We learn that the cup is genuine when Batman demonstrates its "supernatural" powers by using it to heal his wound. From there, the story is set up as an epic stuggle between Batman and all the forces aligned against him. The Merivingian brotherhood, Ra's al Ghul, Catwoman and Penguin are all interested in the artifact at different times to differing degrees.
Azrael puts in an appearance that makes sense given the subject matter of this book. Batman has a wonderful three page scene in Commissioner Gordon's office, where Gordon is actually credited for being as sharp as he'd need to be to have risen to the position he holds. Batman "appears" in Gordon's office, but doesn't surprise the Commissioner, who senses the change in pressure in the room.
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
What would happen if the Holy Grail somehow ended up in the hands of Gotham's esteemed Dark Knight? Sounds like an interesting concept, right?
It is. It could have been in this book. But with the ball so miserably dropped, a concept with much potential quickly went nowhere.
Basically what the story boils down to is this: Batman is entrusted with the Grail (because he has some kind of "blood duty" to take on the responsibility, an idea that I just can't suspend disbelief enough to accept) and protects it from the myriad of baddies out to steal it for various (and sometimes unexplained) reasons. Batman kicks the collective fanny of said baddies, then secures the Grail in an unexpected (but was it, REALLY?) fashion. Ho hum.
That said, the book has its merits, the biggest one being the dreamy, luscious artwork. If you can be swayed to buy a graphic novel for its art alone, this is definitely one to consider. It also contains one of the hunkiest depictions of Bruce Wayne that I've ever seen (yow!).
In short: a great idea that falls flat amid lots of gorgeous pictures.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on April 8, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It is such a pleasure, to see a storyline with such real appeal. Ra's al Ghul is the perfect nemesis for "the Custodian of the Cup". It is Truth, in graphic novel form.
The art is completely well done using diffrent schemes to convey moods and backdrops. This, along with well written lines that are easily read and followed.
Continue on with Batman's nemisis in The Birth, The son and the Bride of the demon. None will dissappoint. All will intrigue and encourage you to really drink from the cup of living water.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Comic
The Chalice, by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by John Van Fleet is a promising concept, but ultimately fails by having too many cameos of the rogues gallery and not dealing with Batman's existential ponderings.

While one reviewer mistakingly asserts religion should not be in comics (after all, religion is such an importnat part of peoples lives, it is hard to imagine that these characters should not be developed likewise), I disagree, it is that unlike Miller's Daredevil, where religion is dealt with on a somewhat real level, this comic is more interested in "Indiana Jones" type serial comic action than dealing with real questions with possible answers.

I, however, still found the story enjoyable. Batman learns that he is to protect the Holy Grail (the bloodline obligation story is weak as another reviewer noted) and does his best to do so. The grail heals him when he takes a step in faith after being wounded, and he proposes to Batgirl/Oracle that the grail can restore her as well - she lacks faith and turns down the opprotunity. This should have been fleshed out more and could have been a compelling story - why some take the step toward faith, and others do not.

The artwork is good, but not oustanding or compelling. The story too short, but the ending is outstanding and allows the reader to see Batman for who he is - a man who will never give up, but also one who will submit his ego for the good of all, for he knows his strengths and his limitations.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?