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Beginning Google Web Toolkit: From Novice to Professional (Expert's Voice in Web Development) 2008th Edition

3.1 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1430210313
ISBN-10: 1430210311
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bram Smeets is a Java architect with over eight years of experience in developing enterprise Java applications. Currently, Bram is technical director at JTeam (www.JTeam.nl), a Java software development company based in the Netherlands, and senior consultant at SpringSource (pringSource.com). He is a regular speaker at technology-focused conferences like The Ajax Experience and SpringOne. Using Google Web Toolkit, Bram has delivered several successful rich Internet applications for JTeam. He also delivered Ajax and Google Web Toolkit trainings at several companies.
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Product Details

  • Series: Expert's Voice in Web Development
  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 2008 edition (September 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430210311
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430210313
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,507,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is well written but is now terribly out of date. The book was written for GWT version 1.5, but at the time of my purchase GWT 1.7 was the latest release. There were more differences than I expected. In just the first third of the book I found the following:

- applicationCreator.cmd is no longer a GWT command. It has been replaced by webAppCreator.cmd

- webAppCreator.cmd creates a different directory structure than the illustrated examples.

- The default application that GWT generates has changed.

- A new event model was introduced in GWT 1.6. Specifically, Listeners are replaced with Handlers. You will encounter this for the first time in chapter 3.

- While I was following the exercises using GWT 1.7, Google released GWT 2.0 which further obsoleted this edition. The 2.0 release introduced a declarative UI with UIBinder. Of course that won't be in this book. Also in 2.0 "Development Mode" replaced the "Hosted Mode" which is great but will confuse the novice using this book as guidance.

The only way this book would be helpful is if you download GWT 1.5 to follow along with the examples. I don't know many programmers, novice or otherwise, that would be content to learn a technology on an old release with deprecated methods and obsolete tooling.

I like the narratives of the book, I like the way it flows, and if the authors ever decide to publish a new edition with GWT 2.0 with the same style and accuracy it would probably earn five stars. Unfortunately the book is too many releases out of date (which is too bad considering it was just Copyrighted in 2008!)
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Format: Paperback
This book stands out as a concise Java developers' introduction to GWT with a fantastic example application and a focus on good design. The example application is built up chapter by chapter and serves as a solid demonstration of how you can pimp your standard web app, GWT-style.

While other GWT book examples are stand-alone doodads that don't look much like webapps, this example really hit the spot. It covers logging in, has a (dynamic) left-side menu, titled modal popups, and a status panel. I actually used this app out-of-the-box as a template for my own first GWT application.

The introduction chapters give a lean overview of what you need to know to get you up and running (with proper browser tooling). It also gives a frank discussion of the advantages and current shortcomings of GWT. By chapter three you're programming using the GWT command line tools.

UI chapters follow and are a definite a strong point thanks to the coherent accompanying example application and an emphasis on good design principles. It's telling that the authors, all members of the pioneering Spring Source inner circle, reference Martin Fowler and Joel Spolsky when discussing these design principles (and pitfalls).

In the spirit of the "Separation of Concerns Principle" and avoiding bidirectional dependencies they advocate an application event structure. I eventually decided not to use it for my small app, but I can see the potential maintenance advantages for a large project.

The Server side chapter introduces GWT RPC, complete with a good exception handling strategy. It also discusses making vanilla HTTP requests for interfacing with any web service and explores using GWT's JSON libraries for communicating complex data structures.
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By Lars Vogel on November 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
I can highly recommand "Beginning Google Web Toolkit" from Apress if you want to start learning GWT.

The nice thing about this book is that it is based on GWT 1.5 and therefore already uses the Java 1.5 language features. The example from the book is building a GWT based Todo List with different categories, something which is actually quite handy to have.

The only negative thing is that I had the feeling that the book repeats itself a bit too often, e.g. it stressed several times how Java programmer can leverage their existing Java knowledge by using GWT.

What I especially liked about the book that it follows a tutorial style building the whole application step-by-step. The book is also very successful in demonstrating how certain conceptional approaches, e.g. separation of concern and testability can be archived with GWT.

Overall a very good book which makes learning the basic GWT very easy.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book may walk you through GWT, but it does so only through the command prompt. They casually mention that "you could use an IDE, if you want"; they make a small mention in appendix A on how to run a couple of popular IDE's, but NOTHING on how to set up the IDE for the project -- you must set up the project all from the command prompt and then "add the files to a project in the IDE". What's the purpose of the IDE? Developing from the IDE is FAR superior and MUCH easier to understand for a "beginner". They should take the word "beginner" out of the title of this book: you really need to be an experienced JAVA developer to comprehend the book.
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