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Belomo MS Peleng 3.5/8mm Fisheye Lens for Canon EOS Cameras - New

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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  • Focal distance, mm 8,1 +/- 0,25; Relative aperture 1:3,5+1:16
  • Angle of view 180 deg; Aspect ratio, mm 24x36; Minimum distance when photographing, 0.3m;
  • Resolution power in the center 55mm, along the edges 15mm; diameter 73mm,length 65,5mm
  • Front and Rear caps, soft pouch included
  • Made in Russia, Brand new, 1 Years International warranty
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Technical Details


Product Description



The new Fisheye Peleng 3.5/8 mm lens is an interchangeable, short- focus, super wide-angle, compact lens that provides a stunning circular field of view of 180 degrees and a circular image (not a full-frame image) on the 35mm negative. It is a must when taking pictures with a large field of view, such as architecture, landscape, and group scenes. You can use this lens for shooting color, black-and-white, and infrared films. It provides meter coupling to your cameras exposure meter, so you maintain through-the-lens metering.
MS Peleng AC has a dedicated Canon EOS mount allowing to use the lens manually with Canon EOS digital and film cameras.


Product Information

Product Dimensions 5.3 x 4.1 x 4 inches
Item Weight 1.2 pounds
Shipping Weight 1.2 pounds
ASIN B001VMQC0I
Item model number MS Peleng 3.5/8A Canon
Customer Reviews
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Best Sellers Rank #711 in Camera & Photo > Lenses > Camera Lenses
Date first available at Amazon.com April 1, 2009

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Top Customer Reviews

By Craig Dickson on February 6, 2010
The Belomo/Peleng 8mm is made in the former Soviet republic of Belarus between Russia and Poland. It is a circular fisheye lens for full-frame cameras such as the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. It creates a circular image that falls entirely within the camera's frame (with the top very slightly cut off by the edge of the frame on my copy), and that image shows a 180-degree hemispherical field of view. On an APS-C camera such as the Canon 7D, 50D, or any of the Rebels, the circle is larger than the sensor, so the image will almost fill the frame, with small black areas in the corners. With either type of sensor, the image shows the dramatic, curving distortion that fisheye lenses are famous (and infamous) for.

The main thing to understand, in this modern age of highly automated, computerized cameras and lenses, is that in many ways this lens is a throwback to the 1950s. (Insert your favorite joke about Soviet industry here.) It has no electrical circuitry whatsoever. When you mount this lens on a camera, the camera's brain does not even know it is there, and cannot control the lens in any way. Not only is focus fully manual, but aperture must be set manually as well, using a control ring on the lens. Aperture will be displayed in the viewfinder as "0", and recorded that way in image EXIF data.

There are three control rings on the lens body. The rearmost (closest to the camera body) is the focus ring. The other two control aperture. The frontmost ring lets you select apertures starting with f/3.5 and then from f/4 to f/16 in whole-stop increments (at least, it has markings and detents at the whole stops, and I haven't tried leaving it halfway between two detents).
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I won't belabor the point about this being a full manual lens, but I will reiterate it. You will get no EXIF with this lens. You have to manually adjust aperture which means "M" mode on your camera is the best bet. Aperture priority (AV, where shutter is varied in-camera) should also work. However shutter priority (Tv where aperture is varied in-camera) absolutely will NOT work.

I used this lens on a Canon 1D Mark II and 5D a few years ago. Optical quality was just "OK" by most standards, but probably pretty decent for such an extreme focal length. Sharpness is good near the center of the frame, but rapidly falls off near the extreme edges. There is a fair amount of chromatic aberration around high contrast edges.

The biggest optical pitfall of this lens, however, is flare. This lens flares VERY VERY easily outdoors or when using a flash. When indoors using a flash you can't aim the flash forward or you will flare terribly every time. You literally have to point the flash behind you to avoid getting the flash in the picture. Outdoors it is a similar story if the sun is out. This can make for some artistic looking pictures, but if you're trying to be technically perfect, it will frustrate you.

Despite being an 8mm F3.5 lens, focus does matter. Don't assume everything will be in focus (like a point and shoot), because it won't. I missed a great deal of pictures with this lens being lazy with focusing. Focusing certainly is less critical than with longer focal length lenses, but you still need to pay attention to what you're doing.

So in short, if you've ever wanted to get a circular fisheye to play around with (you only get the full circle on a full 35mm frame), then this is a great lens. Sigma sells their version for about $800, but given how little use this lens is likely to see for most people, the Peleng is the way to go.
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By Ryan on December 12, 2014
Love it. Bought it ten years ago in high school. I love having it on my body, because you see everything when looking through it! Unfortunately, the lens cap doesn't stay on for beans and has resulted in a pretty scratched fisheye paperweight (just joking! I still use it!). I'm thinking of actually destroying it by sanding out the scratches and bringing it back up to a polish, but my skills and tools at hand are probably insufficient. I think it will ruin the lens. What's worse, having a scratched Peleng fisheye or attempting to fix it which could truly result in a paperweight? What do you think, should I try to fix it? The front element might be coated, which makes me even more hesitant to attempt a rework.
If you are on a budget and crave fisheye, start with this lens. Trust me though, take super good care of it no matter what that entails! Never let the front element touch anything other than soft things!
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I've had this fisheye lens for over three years now, I love everything about it except for the nasty flares you will get from the sun. I higjly recommend this lens to anyone into action sports videography and photography. You will get some pretty cool angles with this thing!
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