Best Business Crime Writing of the Year Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

ISBN-13: 978-1400033713
ISBN-10: 1400033713
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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

A couple of short years ago, CEOs gracing the covers of magazines were hailed as heroes, as investors riding the wave of the "new economy." Today, if a CEO makes the cover of a magazine, it's likely for a different reason: business news is now dominated by stories of corporate fraud. Surowiecki, business writer for the New Yorker, has mined 27 columns from disparate periodicals, chronicling this fall from grace. The biggest scandals, such as the Enron and WorldCom debacles, are covered from several different perspectives, but there's also a dearth of shame revealed about ImClone, Tyco, Qwest, Adelphia, and other less well known names. Although it would be difficult to cite the numerous examples of fine investigative journalism here, the tenor of these articles can be summed up in a piece written by David Wessell for the Wall Street Journal entitled "What's Wrong," which reveals why the system continues to fail to prevent corporate leaders from cheating for their own gain. David Siegfried
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“This is worth a read even if you take it chunk by chunk. They are all digestible nuggets of financial misdeeds …. The details are lovely and juicy. It's all about egos, excess, lack of caution.” -- USA Today


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

  • File Size: 743 KB
  • Print Length: 274 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor (December 18, 2007)
  • Publication Date: December 18, 2007
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000XUBG3M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,238,442 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book will help to breed healthy skepticism. 2002 was a defining year for modern business crimes, or at least reported business crimes, and this book provides a succinct and clear review of the highflying companies, the colorful players, their notorious crimes, and the pertinent issues. I finally understand how Enron schemed and ImClone conned. The editor has selected some of the best reports of each crime, crimes where greed and vice, instead of virtue, were rewarded, and he has brought each story up to date with unfolding news. In Part One, Surowiecki selected stories about the corporate hucksters, conmen, CEOs, visionaries, and villains, from the Washington Post, Vanity Fair, Forbes, The New York Times, The LA Times, The WSJ, and even The Edmonton Journal. The stories illuminate the events at Enron, WorldCom, ImClone, CriticalPath, Quest, Tyco, and Adelphia. The Edmonton Journal's story on WorldCom's Bernie Ebbers is among the best I read. No Mississippi paper would touch that profile. You might never read a business press puff piece about a CEO, or trust a devoutly religious or visionary CEO the same way again. In Part Two, the stories focus on "Who Watches the Watchmen?" Stories from The New Yorker, The New York Times, BW, USBanker, and The WSJ highlight the SEC and NY Attorney General Elliot Spitzer, and the corruptions of Wall Street analysts, "independent knowers," and at the self regulating Big Five accounting firms, especially Andersen Worldwide. The profile of Jack Grubman, a disgraced telecom analyst who lacked objectivity is a delight to read. In Part Three, the selected stories concern "What Went Wrong, and How Do We Fix It?" Stories from the WSJ, Business 2.0, Slate, Bloomberg, Fortune, The Weekly Standard, and The Atlantic Monthly investigate whether corruption is an always a byproduct of bull market bubbles, whether stock options lead to the rewarding of bad behavior, and whether greedy investors themselves are to blame for what befalls them.
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Format: Paperback
Although it's a bit dated (the stories are from 2002), I decided to read Best Business Crime Writing Of The Year edited By James Surowiecki. Definitely a good read for those looking to make sense of an ugly period of corporate America.

The book is a compilation of various columns and articles from publications over the year 2002, and they all deal with the criminal aspect of businesses like Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, and others. As most of the articles are "feature length", there's a solid level of coverage on each story, so you don't feel like you're just getting a taste of the real story. The chapters are grouped by section, so you get stories about the main players, the accountants and auditors who were supposed to be watching the store, and some analysis about how the companies imploded.

Even though the material is a couple years old, it doesn't suffer much with the lag time. In fact, it's sort of interesting to see how things have progressed since the story was written. I think the parts that are most valuable and will continue to be are the biographies of the CEOs who led the companies to their demise. Definitely worth reading, especially if you were involved in any way with these fiascoes.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Had I read this book years ago, I would be raving about it. However, most of it detailed incidents that have been discussed, written about, and reported on ad nauseum. Otherwise, it was a good book. The writing was excellent.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love all reviews, snippets, themed collections. I read very happily Best American Short Story, Best American Science and Nature Writing, Harpers Indices, and all manner of reference material.

But this book is among the worst. Unfortunately, the editors focused on accounting/securities fraud to the exclusion of everything else. The articles were horribly redundant, and repetitive, and kept saying the same thing over and over.
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